Norway Cloud Service Touts NSA-Free Storage As Alternative To Dropbox, SkyDrive And Other U.S. Services

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Jottacloud, a cloud storage service based in Norway, is promoting itself as a safe and secure haven, free of the NSA’s long reach that it has with services such as SkyDrive, Dropbox and iCloud.

According to a company blog post, the files stored on Jottacloud’s service are protected under Norwegian law, independent of the U.S. Patriot Act. Under U.S. law, companies like Microsoft, Google and Amazon are required to turn over users’ data. The law is also applicable to local subsidiary companies operated around the world. Jottacloud has its own data centers in Norway, and they say users are protected against U.S. legislation.

I love it how companies are starting to tout their NSA-free capabilities. But here’s the thing. That file has a long way to travel before it can be in the safe haven of a Norwegian data center. It may run through countries that don’t protect it from getting snooped.

But that a file is like some fleeing object has its own fascinations. The Internet is more treacherous than ever. It’s getting cast as a place with its own fairy-tale world of both sinister evils and places of light. It’s a juxtaposition that paints the United States and its people as the monsters — the evil snoops. In contrast, the people of Norway are telling the world that all is safe in the land of the Jottacloud — as long as your files can make it there.