jeremy fisher
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days

With Automatic Photo Import, Days Gets One Step Closer To Having Users Share Everything

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Days by Wander launched back in May with a very difficult mission: to change the way you think about photo-sharing. While some think that pictures of your feet or coffee are too mundane for photo-sharing to Instagram or Facebook, Days asked you to share as many photos as possible, mundane or otherwise.

To help usher in this type of behavior, Days didn’t allow photo imports, as they wanted users to share pictures the same way they take them, which is a lot. Today, however, the app is updating with a new feature: photo imports.

But it’s not like most other photo-sharing apps, where you simply choose the photos you want to upload from your camera roll. Instead, you turn on photo import once and Days automatically begins uploading every photo you take.

Founder Jeremy Fisher believes that you should share almost everything, and delete the bits you don’t want. This goes against the grain of most of our behavior, which is to take far too many photos in the camera roll, and select only the choice bits to share.

However, the alternative must be a deterrent to Days usage.

I’ll explain. Days is an app that doesn’t aspire to real-time, selective photo-sharing. The idea, rather, is to share lots of photos in a collection, a Day. This day isn’t shared in real-time — users can choose to publish their day the day after. Fisher explains that it’s not about bits and pieces in real-time but about sharing a comprehensive story.

Fisher also wanted the content to be real, even if we might think of it as boring. Because it’s being shared as a story of your day, context makes seemingly mundane or boring photos interesting all of the sudden.

To accomplish this, Days originally didn’t allow photo import, to ensure that the content wasn’t edited or filtered. But to accomplish this feat, of having users share everything, Days asked users to take all of their photos in Days instead of the camera app. With swipe to camera from the lockscreen, as well as habit, this likely proved difficult.

Thus, the strategy has changed to auto-import everything from the camera roll into a draft. Days still has a task on its hands considering that there is already a dominant photo-sharing tool on the market in Instagram and that it has taught users to share worthwhile photos instead of every little detail.

Still, the new photo import feature should help quite a bit.

To check out Days, head on over to the App Store and download for free.