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What we talk about when we talk about WWDC

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Every year it’s the same thing. WORST.KEYNOTE.EVAR! WHERE IS ITABLET! STEVE SHOULD BUY ME A PONY! PC World wrote a laundry list of things that they wanted to see but didn’t get to see at WWDC and, like a 16-year-old whose boyfriend is supposed to hug her and kiss her and stay with her at the mall all weekend and respond to all of her texts immediately if not sooner, they get pissy when they don’t get what they want. A pox on them, I say.

What were they looking for? An iPhone Nano. An iTablet. An FM transmitter. First, it takes a while to make good hardware. We know there will be a tablet. No confirmation on a Nano. But an FM transmitter? You bought an iPhone. You think Apple wants to knock out all the car adapter manufacturers in one fell swoop? Hell, the iPhone is one of the few phones that has a whole constellation of accessories. Almost every WinMo phone needs FM out, not Cupertino’s darling.

But the biggest gripe is flash support. TUAW puts it best:

Adobe needs to get Flash working properly on the Mac first. If my MacBook Pro’s 2.6 GHz processor pegs at 80% while watching lo-res YouTube videos, what chance does the iPhone’s far slower processor have? And if the Flash plugin crashes the full Safari browser so often that Apple has gone out of their way to sandbox browser plugins in Snow Leopard, how much of a rush should Apple be in to do the same thing on a platform whose small size and relatively low processing power necessitates more streamlined software? Yes, let’s have Apple dive into Flash support for the iPhone right away, and see what it gets you: one hour of battery life, flashing banner ads all over the place for you to accidentally click when you’re just trying to scroll the page, and Mobile Safari crashing every five minutes.

Eg-freaking-zactly. Come on, people. What does Flash add to the user experience? Flash games, perhaps, but show me one time it’s been more valuable than a stand-alone, Internet-enabled application. You really need in-line YouTube watching? No.

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