Wallop

Wallop Takes A Leap Into the Deadpool

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Wallop

Once the brainchild of Microsoft Research, Wallop joined the fray of social networks back in 2006 when the company’s CEO told the world that it wanted to compete with the likes of Facebook and MySpace, but do so by providing users with an unlimited capacity to upload digital media and have a revenue model that didn’t revolve around advertising, but instead it would revolve around the sale of “self-expression items.”

At that time, the company believed that everything was in place and it was ready to confront the world of social networks with a service that could easily compete on the same level as Facebook and MySpace.

Evidently, it was wrong.

Although there hasn’t been an official statement made by the company explicitly saying Wallop is dead, the company’s site now features a blurb saying site use will end September 18 and users will no longer be allowed to access their accounts after that time.

Dear Wallop.com Member,

Thank you for being part of the Wallop beta social networking site. We really appreciate your feedback and support. The beta period will end on September 18th, 2008 – after that date you will no longer be able to access your account.

Please check out our apps Cool Cards and Party On! On Facebook.

Thanks again,
The Wallop.com Team

An email was sent to the company’s press address to see what would come of it after that date, but the email address was removed from the company’s bank of addresses — another telltale sign that the service is dead.

Wallop will still live on in two Facebook applications though. On the company’s site, it’s still promoting its Cool Cards app, which lets Facebook users send animated greetings using their own audio, pictures, and video to friends. It’s also promoting its Party On! app, which lets Facebook users send animated party invitations to their friends.

But as a social network, Wallop has entered the deadpool.

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