Danny Crichton

Danny Crichton is an award-winning researcher and writer on regional innovation hubs with an intense passion for building companies and building nations.

Founding his first company in high school, Danny was formerly an investor at General Catalyst Partners, where he engaged companies in the mobile, labor, defense and security spaces. He led the technical infrastructure for SignalFire, a data-driven talent firm, and worked on several of the firm’s investments.

In 2011-2012, Danny was a Fulbright Scholar in South Korea, where he was a visiting researcher at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Daejeon. His research investigated the impact of Korean government policy on the engineering pipeline of new graduates between high school and the workforce, as well as the individuals and groups that have formed in the Seoul regional innovation hub. He presented his research at KAIST, the Korean-American Education Commission (KAEC), Samsung’s Global Strategy Group, and on the Korean radio station Arirang.

Before leaving the United States, he worked in product management at Google, where he conceived and launched Google+ Search.

While at Stanford University in California, Danny wrote an award-winning thesis on the history of Silicon Valley and Stanford’s Department of Computer Science, developing a novel ecosystem-based model to analyze the unique development of the world’s most recognized regional innovation hub. He presented the paper at the Triple Helix Conference, one of the largest research organizations devoted to building regional innovation throughout the world.

Danny graduated with honors and Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University with a B.S. in Mathematical and Computational Science.

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Featured Picks from Danny Crichton


Latest from Danny Crichton

  • Why Stock Prices Are So Important For Startups

    Why Stock Prices Are So Important For Startups

    Yesterday was a bit of a bloodbath for shares of internet stocks. The NASDAQ composite index declined by almost 130 points, its worst drop in two years, and Splunk and FireEye, two of last year’s most popular technology IPOs, each declined by more than 10%. The one-day tumble doesn’t undo the gains made by the markets over the past 24 months, during which both the NASDAQ and S&P 500… Read More

  • Do Startups Stand A Chance Against Valley Incumbents?

    Do Startups Stand A Chance Against Valley Incumbents?

    A few weeks ago, I was talking with an entrepreneur in the search space who had a simple question: “Can Google ever be beat?” It’s actually quite profound, one at the heart of everything we do in startups. Is it possible to defeat the incumbent players, even when they are essentially monopolies? I answered with the usual Silicon Valley rhetoric and bravado, arguing that every company will… Read More

  • Spitfire’s In-Depth Fitness Regimens Target Women Ready To Push Their Limits

    Spitfire’s In-Depth Fitness Regimens Target Women Ready To Push Their Limits

    It all started at a party with a bottle of protein powder. Erin Parker, a Stanford graduate and enthusiastic proponent of “bikini bodybuilding,” was visiting a friend’s party while holding some protein powder. These amino acids proved relatively unpopular with the other guests in attendance, but one other person at the event was at least curious about the woman holding protein. Read More

  • Creating Billion-Dollar IPOs And Deleting ActiveX: The Elixir Making Korea The Key Startup Ecosystem In Asia

    Creating Billion-Dollar IPOs And Deleting ActiveX: The Elixir Making Korea The Key Startup Ecosystem In Asia

    It can be hard to see the connection between My Love From the Star, a freakishly popular Korean drama series which has received some 15 billion views online, and Uber Korea. Yet, in the past few days, it has become clear that their fates, as well as others in this nascent startup ecosystem, are intertwined in a bizarre plot that will determine the future of South Korea’s push for innovation. Read More

  • Journalism Is Not Content Production

    Journalism Is Not Content Production

    Journalism is dead. Or so said everyone who told me never to pursue a career in news gathering. Given the news industry’s bleak statistics the past few decades, such fears have certainly been well-founded. Yet, these formerly dire predictions have simmered down, replaced with a hopeful curiosity about the future of the industry and its potential to rebuild itself after years of consolidations… Read More

  • In A Changing Financial World, Thinknum Wants To Democratize Financial Analysis

    In A Changing Financial World, Thinknum Wants To Democratize Financial Analysis

    One of the most important functions of any modern financial institution is conducting valuations. On Wall Street, this means developing financial models – projections of how a company will perform based on a set of assumptions. Get these models right, and suddenly you can make trades on public equities that bring in enormous profits. Blow it, and see billions of dollars evaporate. Read More

  • This Funding Will Disappear In 10 Seconds

    This Funding Will Disappear In 10 Seconds

    I know that the Ephemeralization of 2014 is generally traced to some privacy potion of Edward Snowden, NSA, and Target credit card leaks, but few seem willing to track its popularity back to its source – Oracle. You see, Oracle’s marketing people are geniuses. Following the continued outrage over today’s perilous state of MySQL, the open-source database acquired through its… Read More

  • Searching For The Silicon Valley Selfie

    Searching For The Silicon Valley Selfie

    There are many benefits to living overseas, but among the most valuable is the ability to dislocate yourself from your timeworn surroundings. The typical cadence of our daily behaviors – driving down 280 every morning or getting a burger at SuperDuper before closing – suddenly and irrevocably disappear, and our minds suddenly become more active in seeking the stability of the regular. Read More

  • Flare-Up Over Food-Delivery Fees Has South Koreans Debating The Marketplace Model

    Flare-Up Over Food-Delivery Fees Has South Koreans Debating The Marketplace Model

    South Korea is no stranger to controversy over its Internet policies. The country still mandates virus protection and security measures that essentially require the use of Internet Explorer and Windows, and the government has one of the most aggressive Internet policing bureaucracies in the democratic world. The Economist has called the country an “Internet dinosaur” despite its… Read More

  • From Crowdfunding To Open Access, Startups Are Experimenting With Academic Research

    From Crowdfunding To Open Access, Startups Are Experimenting With Academic Research

    These days may well be the next golden age for universities, and startups are leading the way. For institutions that can feel much like their counterparts from a thousand years ago, universities have witnessed breathtaking change in just a handful of years. Read More

  • With Mt.Gox In Flames, A Lesson: When Building A Company, First Do No Harm

    With Mt.Gox In Flames, A Lesson: When Building A Company, First Do No Harm

    The collapse of Mt.Gox this week has sent shockwaves through the early-adopting tech community. Hundreds of millions of dollars worth of bitcoins have been lost, and account holders are justifiably angry about their missing balances. It is easy to heap blame on Mt.Gox’s founders and call this a once-in-a-lifetime calamity, but the context behind the company’s demise is far more pernicious and… Read More

  • Approaching The Frontier: How One Entrepreneur Is Building The Future In Myanmar

    Approaching The Frontier: How One Entrepreneur Is Building The Future In Myanmar

    It can be hard for even the strongest entrepreneurs to succeed in cutthroat Silicon Valley. But throw in simmering civil conflict, an almost non-existent Internet infrastructure, a military junta that is still in the early phases of transitioning to democratic rule, and developers more familiar with ColdFusion than Ruby on Rails, and one might reasonably think that it would be nearly impossible… Read More

  • Business As Usual In The New Silicon Valley

    Business As Usual In The New Silicon Valley

    Now here is one spectacular tale. A company, with little PR or marketing, grows in just a handful of years to connect half a billion people around the world through a simple messaging app. The company gets acquired for a hefty sum; in this case, the largest sum ever in the history of venture-backed startup acquisitions. Billionaires and millionaires are created almost out of thin air. Read More

  • A Networking Protocol For Labor

    A Networking Protocol For Labor

    The core advancement of the Internet was the capability to move information very quickly across a decentralized network of nodes. That advancement was predicated on the development of protocols like HTTP, SMTP and Bitcoin that codified how such data should move to accomplish our tasks. Read More

  • With Hackathons Taking Center Stage, The Coming Transformation Of The Computer Scientist

    With Hackathons Taking Center Stage, The Coming Transformation Of The Computer Scientist

    “I didn’t own my own laptop,” he said. That didn’t stop him from attending his first hackathon several weeks later at Hacka2thon, where he built his first website. The experience ignited his enthusiasm, and over the next two years, Fontenot would found and develop MHacks into one of the largest hackathons in the country, last month hosting more than 1,000 students from… Read More

  • Book Review: In “Different,” Finding Better Ways To Build Brands In A Noisy (And Boring) World

    Book Review: In “Different,” Finding Better Ways To Build Brands In A Noisy (And Boring) World

    Some books age well, and "Different" is no exception. First published in paperback two years ago, the book is a lurid text that seems more applicable to startups today than during its actual publication. Youngme Moon delivers a stark assessment on the current state of product strategy and marketing. Read More

  • Let’s Just Forget Everything

    Let’s Just Forget Everything

    I always think a little historical perspective is good in a fast-moving industry like tech. So when Facebook released Paper this week, I did what any decent tech journalist would do –- I visited the website of the Robert C. Williams Paper Museum at Georgia Tech. Unfortunately, the only thing I could find about the social networking company was the museum’s Facebook page, which at 573 likes, is… Read More

  • The Complete Quantitative Guide To Judging Your Startup

    The Complete Quantitative Guide To Judging Your Startup

    Raising capital from investors is often a frustrating experience. While part of that frustration will always be present when working on high-risk projects, a lot of the aggravation comes from the lack of clear signposts that allow founders to judge their company’s performance. The reality is, most founders only ever hear a “yes” or a “no” from a venture capitalist, without a lucid… Read More

  • Silicon Valley Is Now Public Enemy No. 1, And We Only Have Ourselves To Blame

    Silicon Valley Is Now Public Enemy No. 1, And We Only Have Ourselves To Blame

    For a region noted for its problem-solving orientation and progressive ethos, Silicon Valley has managed to anger a pretty wide swath of American society. Some of the blows have been self-inflicted, like venture capitalists who compare progressivism to Nazism or who block access to public beaches. But those issues are mere skirmishes compared to the war over increasing inequality in San Francisco… Read More