Danny Crichton

Danny is a contributing writer at TechCrunch, where he covers startups, finance, New York City, politics, infrastructure, and many more. In addition, he is currently working on an open-source project called Reformat. Formerly, he was a venture capitalist at CRV and GC. He is a Harvard PhD dropout, and a graduate of Stanford in MCS.

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  • Algorithmic zoning could be the answer to cheaper housing and more equitable cities

    Algorithmic zoning could be the answer to cheaper housing and more equitable cities

    Zoning codes are a century old, and the lifeblood of all major U.S. cities (except arguably Houston), determining what can be built where and what activities can take place in a neighborhood. Yet as their complexity has risen, academics are increasingly exploring whether their rule-based systems for rationalizing urban space could be replaced with dynamic systems based on blockchains… Read More

  • Engineering against all odds, or how NYC’s subway will get wireless in the tunnels

    Engineering against all odds, or how NYC’s subway will get wireless in the tunnels

    Never ask a wireless engineer working on the NYC subway system “What can go wrong?” Flooding, ice, brake dust, and power outages relentlessly attack the network components. Rats — many, many rats — can eat power and fiber optic cables and bring down the whole system. Humans are no different, as their curiosity or malice strikes a blow against wireless hardware… Read More

  • Digital nomads are hiring and firing their governments

    Digital nomads are hiring and firing their governments

    The nation state has survived wars, plagues, and upheaval, but it won’t survive digital nomads, not if people like Karoli Hindriks have something to say about it. Hindriks is the founder of Jobbatical, a platform that allows digital nomads to find work in other countries and helps with the logistics of getting there. The company also embodies a new world of highly-skilled, global… Read More

  • Uncommon.co launches and raises $18m to bring objectivity and efficiency to hiring

    Uncommon.co launches and raises $18m to bring objectivity and efficiency to hiring

    Traditional models of recruiting are a mess. At companies like Google, quite literally millions of people apply for open roles, forcing hundreds of recruiters to sift through thousands of resumes per job opening. Worse, in their race to process through those applicants, recruiters often use fuzzy and subjective impressions of a candidate to match them to a role, rather than clear and… Read More

  • Traction Tech Council launches to help IT execs spend money on the right startups

    Traction Tech Council launches to help IT execs spend money on the right startups

    Sourcing the right technology for a company has always been challenging, but today it is an entirely different beast. There are tens of thousands of startups out there hawking their technology services, and the pace of innovation has increased dramatically. Hundreds of startups claim to use artificial intelligence or blockchain technology in their software, but do they actually solve the… Read More

  • HR has lost the trust of employees. Here is who has it now

    HR has lost the trust of employees. Here is who has it now

    Human resources has to be one of the greatest bait-and-switch professions one can join today. HR departments position themselves with a forward-facing fluffy image, whether improving the productivity of workers through training and development programs or perhaps righting the yawning inequality gap in America by encouraging diverse hiring standards. Unsurprisingly, the field often attracts… Read More

  • The real consequences of fake porn and news

    The real consequences of fake porn and news

    There is a movement underway to ban involuntary porn, videos that use machine learning to superimpose faces of unwilling participants onto porn actors’ bodies. Yesterday, as TC noted, Reddit published a content policy banning such images and video. Other sites have similar policies. Porn, though, is merely the harbinger of a world of involuntary, fake content. Read More

  • Brainjunk and the killing of the internet mind

    Brainjunk and the killing of the internet mind

    Michael Pollan, the best-selling author of food books including the The Omnivore’s Dilemma and Food Rules, summarized his philosophy of eating quite simply. “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” The idea was to spend more on quality, and avoid the sorts of junk food that are deeply unhealthy for our physical bodies. I think it’s well past time to borrow that… Read More

  • Scaling a bootstrapped business is next frontier of entrepreneurship for Evan Frank

    Scaling a bootstrapped business is next frontier of entrepreneurship for Evan Frank

    Evan Frank was five years old when he first knew he was going to be an entrepreneur. While attending kindergarten, Frank crafted books and sold them to his teacher at a nickel to a dime a piece. “There was always this desire to build stuff,” he explained to me, and also clearly a desire to make some money on those projects, to boot. Read More

  • Hate your boss? B12 is designing work without (human) managers

    Hate your boss? B12 is designing work without (human) managers

    Online labor marketplaces have been around since the dawn of the internet. Post a task, select a worker, verify the work, and submit a payment. There are dozens of companies that broker labor services, and the rise of these marketplaces has been a large factor in encouraging as many as a third of American workers to become freelancers. While finding individual workers for simple tasks is… Read More

  • The rise of chaos engineering

    The rise of chaos engineering

    How do you build reliable software? It is a question that has been at the top of my mind the past few weeks, as I seem to be increasingly confronted by software that just doesn’t work anymore. Bugs, crashes, errors, data leaks: they are so common in our every day lives that they can seem completely unremarkable. The existing tools — unit tests, application performance monitoring… Read More

  • NEA leads $21m round for Drop, a rewards app for millennials

    NEA leads $21m round for Drop, a rewards app for millennials

    Everyone loves free stuff, apparently including VC investors. Toronto-based Drop, whose app allows consumers to collect points for transactions they make and then receive reward offers, has secured a $21 million Series A round led by Rick Yang at NEA. The company has previously raised about $5 million in seed capital over the past year. Drop’s concept is simple. Unlike traditional… Read More

  • The legacy of Ikea founder Ingvar Kamprad, who passed today at 91

    The legacy of Ikea founder Ingvar Kamprad, who passed today at 91

    One of the great entrepreneurs of the 20th century, Ingvar Kamprad, the founder of IKEA, passed away today. As Reuters pointed out in its short biography, Kamprad created a store — as a teenager mind you — that today has more than 400 locations, revenues of $62 billion, and a cultural ubiquity that very few consumer products could ever hope to attain. Having read the IKEA story… Read More

  • Move slow and break nothing

    Move slow and break nothing

    Facebook Messenger was down for me for about an hour earlier this week. My MacBook Pro randomly kernel panics overnight and restarts. Slack was down, and Github, and AWS. A little more than a year ago, Dyn went down, throwing the DNS layer of the internet into a tailspin. Practically every chip made by Intel has serious security flaws. Equifax leaked 143 million accounts. Tokyo-based… Read More

  • Scout networks are latest VC salvo in war for founders

    Scout networks are latest VC salvo in war for founders

    Founders are extraordinarily busy, even for their own investors. A decade ago, they might have had relationships with a handful of VC partners as they scaled their businesses and raised additional rounds of capital. Today, it is hardly rare to see as many as fifteen or twenty investment firms and angels listed on the cap table following a seed round. If you add up all the partners at those… Read More

  • Ex-Uber Maps exec Brian McClendon running for office

    Ex-Uber Maps exec Brian McClendon running for office

    Brian McClendon, a notable engineering executive at startups and large tech companies, including Google and Uber, has announced his candidacy to run for the open seat of secretary of state of Kansas. He will compete in the Democratic primary scheduled for August 7th. McClendon has been a lifelong engineer, growing up in the state and receiving his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering… Read More

  • Startups, high-speed rail and California’s infrastructure future

    Startups, high-speed rail and California’s infrastructure future

    California is home to two very different innovation worlds. For the readers of TechCrunch, there is the familiar excitement of the startup world, with startups working on longevity and age extension, rockets to Mars, and cars that drive themselves. Hundreds of thousands of entrepreneurs, engineers, and product managers are building these futures every day, often on shoestring budgets all in… Read More

  • The Chinese think Palo Alto is dumpy

    The Chinese think Palo Alto is dumpy

    Good news! The great Raw Water Story of 2017 is finally over. Google tells me that searches went up ten-fold over the raw water craze, but thankfully, humans seem to have filtered out any more stories or follow ups. Silicon Valley can rest easy. But wait! There is another crisis brewing, and it isn’t the animal fecal matter in your algae water. Over the past few days, we’ve seen… Read More

  • Mike Moritz and the declining America worker

    Mike Moritz and the declining America worker

    Storied Sequoia investor Mike Moritz threw fire into the tech Twitter gumbo with his observations of hard-working Chinese workers and slothful Silicon Valley engineers. Moritz, a billionaire, clearly needs page views to fund his retirement. The major money quote about Silicon Valley is this: “In recent months, there have been complaints about the political sensibilities of speakers… Read More

  • Yes, cities should indeed fight for tech jobs

    Yes, cities should indeed fight for tech jobs

    Few events have jolted the urban planning crowd quite like Amazon’s process for selecting the company’s new second headquarters (dubbed HQ2). The company put up a massive carrot of 50,000 jobs and $5 billion in investment, and then proceeded to demand proposals from cities across North America (lovingly written up by Clickhole). Perhaps unsurprisingly, Amazon received 238… Read More

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