Greg Epstein

Greg Epstein Contributor Share on Twitter Greg M. Epstein is the Humanist Chaplain at Harvard and MIT, and the author of The New York Times bestselling book "Good Without God." Described as a “godfather to the [humanist] movement” by The New York Times Magazine in recognition of his efforts to build inclusive, inspiring and ethical communities for the nonreligious and allies, Greg was also named “one of the top faith and moral leaders in the United States” by Faithful Internet, a project of the United Church of Christ and the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society. More posts by this contributor Is tech socialism really on the rise? ‘Capitalism generates a lot of wealth depending on the situation’

Greg M. Epstein is the Humanist Chaplain at Harvard and MIT, and the author of The New York Times bestselling book “Good Without God.” Described as a “godfather to the [humanist] movement” by The New York Times Magazine in recognition of his efforts to build inclusive, inspiring and ethical communities for the nonreligious and allies, Greg was also named “one of the top faith and moral leaders in the United States” by Faithful Internet, a project of the United Church of Christ and the Stanford Law School Center for Internet and Society.

The Latest from Greg Epstein

Is tech socialism really on the rise?

Ultimately, it's a question of human dignity. To what degree are people given the opportunity to realize their potential, to create themselves?

‘Capitalism generates a lot of wealth depending on the situation’

When you think about how a technology is designed, whether in Facebook or, let's say, with industrial automation robots, engineers are not talking to the workers for obvious reasons.

Justin Kan opens up (Part 2)

"I like to talk about things that I'm learning that I think are applicable to other people."

Justin Kan opens up (Part 1)

In a free-wheeling interview, the serial entrepreneur covers a number of topics, including spirituality, stress and therapy.

Will the future of work be ethical? Founder perspectives

Andrea Thomasz of Diligent Robotics and Prayag Narula of LeadGenius spoke to Greg Epstein at EmTech Next, a conference organized by the MIT Technology Review.

Will the future of work be ethical? Future leader perspectives

In this interview, Greg Epstein talks to Meili Gupta, a senior at Phillips Exeter Academy, and Walter Erike, an independent consultant and SAP Implementation Senior Manager.

Will the future of work be ethical? Perspectives from MIT Technology Review

Excerpts from conversations with Gideon Lichfield, editor in chief of the MIT Technology Review, and Karen Hao, its artificial intelligence reporter.

Will the future of work be ethical? Academic perspectives

Greg Epstein interviews economist David Autor and Susan Winterberg, an academic who studies business and ethics.

Will the future of work be ethical?

Will tomorrow’s leaders, despite good and ethical intentions, ultimately use their high-tech tools to exploit others ever more efficiently, or to find a better path forward?

‘People fix things. Tech doesn’t fix things.’

Veena Dubal is an unlikely star in the tech world. A scholar of labor practices regarding the taxi and ride-hailing industries and an Associate Professor at San Francisco’s U.C. Hastings College of

Silicon Valley’s competing philosophies on tech ethics with The New Yorker’s Andrew Marantz

“If Silicon Valley is going to keep telling itself the story that the only uses of their technology will be the most optimistic, the most hopeful, the most salubrious, the most prosocial,” New Yor

How ‘the Internet broke America’ with The New Yorker’s Andrew Marantz

When Elizabeth Warren took on Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook earlier this week, it was a low moment for what New Yorker writer Andrew Marantz calls “techno-utopianism.” That the progressive, populis

TC’s Greg Epstein and Kate Clark talk mental health startups and the ‘Cult of the Founder’

Some weeks, tech ethics is in the news. And some weeks, it IS the news. This week was one of the latter. There were so many ethically fraught news stories about technology companies over these past fe

‘Am I as brave as I think I am?’ MIT Media Lab student Arwa Mboya on the aftermath of a scandal

It’s been another hard week at MIT. Our campus has been divided by revelations of inappropriate fundraising, coverups, and the harboring of far too many tech geniuses who seemingly put their own int

The MIT Media Lab controversy and getting back to ‘radical courage’, with Media Lab student Arwa Mboya

People win prestigious prizes in tech all the time, but there is something different about The Bold Prize. Unless you’ve been living under a literal or proverbial rock, you’ve probably heard somet

Teaching ethics in computer science the right way with Georgia Tech’s Charles Isbell

The new fall semester is upon us, and at elite private colleges and universities, it’s hard to find a trendier major than Computer Science. It’s also becoming more common for such institutions to

Hundreds of Uber and Lyft drivers to launch a protest caravan across California

If you’re like me, chances are good you just distractedly clicked on this article while scrolling through your feed in, or while waiting for, a Lyft. Maybe, like me, you need that app to get to back

How ‘ghost work’ in Silicon Valley pressures the workforce, with Mary Gray

The phrase “pull yourself up by your own bootstraps” was originally meant sarcastically. It’s not actually physically possible to do — especially while wearing Allbirds and having just

Why AI needs more social workers, with Columbia University’s Desmond Patton

Sometimes it does seem the entire tech industry could use someone to talk to, like a good therapist or social worker. That might sound like an insult, but I mean it mostly earnestly: I am a chaplain w

Inside the history of Silicon Valley labor, with Louis Hyman

As I wrote for TechCrunch recently, immigration is not an issue always associated with tech — not even when thinking about the ethics of technology, as I do here. So when I was moved to tears a few
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