science

  • Scientists “Train” Water To Move On Its Own

    Scientists “Train” Water To Move On Its Own

    In what could be a useful trick for moving chemicals from one point to another, scientists at the University of Southern Denmark and Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Czech Republic have created a method to “move” liquids through an alcohol base. While that alone isn’t very cool, just look at the video above: in it you see a small droplet of colored water move… Read More

  • Function Space Brings Its Learning, Discussing And Problem Solving Science Platform To iOS

    Function Space Brings Its Learning, Discussing And Problem Solving Science Platform To iOS

    Learning, discussing and problem solving are three important steps in understanding concepts in science. Function Space, a social learning science network, wants to bring the three together in a cross-platform learning portal aimed at corporate research and students at any level for free. Read More

  • Watch This Robot Learn To “Walk Off” An Injury

    Watch This Robot Learn To “Walk Off” An Injury

    What do you do if you’re a robotic hexapod and one of your legs is broken? Do you give up? Lie down and burst into flames? Cry from tear duct-less eyes? Or, through a process of trial-and-error, do you brush yourself off, hide your broken leg, and learn to walk again? You guessed it. Researchers Antoine Cully, Jeff Clune and Jean-Baptiste Mouret have trained a hexapod to try… Read More

  • Agent Ribbit Delivers Monthly Science Kits For Kids

    Agent Ribbit Delivers Monthly Science Kits For Kids

    If you’re of a certain age, you probably remember a childhood filled with explorations of the natural world: magnifying glasses, Sea Monkeys, leaf presses, ant farms, at-home chemistry sets, volcano science fair projects, telescopes and microscopes, and more. But today’s kids seem more keen to explore the world of iPad applications than the mysteries around them. A newly… Read More

  • Bio
    New Bio-Sensor Draws Liquid Out From Under Your Skin To See If You’re Thirsty

    New Bio-Sensor Draws Liquid Out From Under Your Skin To See If You’re Thirsty

    As you may well know, plants (and humans) need electrolytes. Until now, however, we’ve had to trust our guts and go out and buy a bottle of Brawndo if we were feeling a little down. Fear not, however, because a new sensor will use micro needles to steal a bit of your precious bodily fluids in order to tell when you need to fuel up. Read More

  • Mystery Science Launches A Program Aimed At Inspiring Kids To Love Science, Not Just Learn Its Conclusions

    Mystery Science Launches A Program Aimed At Inspiring Kids To Love Science, Not Just Learn Its Conclusions

    A former Facebook Product Manager has teamed up with the former science director from Southern California-based LePort Schools to create a new educational platform designed to inspire kids to learn to love science. Called “Mystery Science,” the program is being offered to teachers and schools, and involves a combination of short videos, classroom discussion topics and… Read More

  • Now You Can Craft Your Selfie For Maximum Likes – With Science

    Now You Can Craft Your Selfie For Maximum Likes – With Science

    Selfies are so hot that they might already be over (if I’m aware of something being cool it usually isn’t anymore) but you don’t have to just crank out pictures of your mug taken at arm’s length indiscriminately in hopes of finding an angle that plays well on social media. Thanks to MIT PhD student Aditya Khosla (via CSAIL), you’ll save yourself some arm strain… Read More

  • The Decline And Fall Of Flowtab, A Startup Story

    The Decline And Fall Of Flowtab, A Startup Story

    It started with an idea: How can we get our drinks more quickly at the bar? Dreamed up at 2 a.m. in Coloft, a Los Angeles coworking space, future founder Mike Townsend doodled up an iPad application mockup that he called Apptini to answer the question.
    The product, later known as Flowtab, had been born. Its life became a startup story that most don’t tell: A company that didn’t… Read More

  • Researchers Build The First Brain-To-Brain Control Interface

    Researchers Build The First Brain-To-Brain Control Interface

    Researchers at the University of Washington, Rajesh Rao and Andrea Stocco, have created a remote, non-invasive brain-to-brain interface that allowed Rao to move Stocco’s finger remotely on a keyboard using his thoughts. “The Internet was a way to connect computers, and now it can be a way to connect brains,” Stocco said in a release. “We want to take the knowledge of… Read More

  • Researchers Create “Near-Exhaustive,” Ultra-Realistic Cloth Simulation

    Cloth is hard to simulate yet it’s important in gaming, scientific analysis, and CGI. That’s why scientists at Berkely and Carnegie Mellon have spent six months exhaustively exploring all of the possible configurations of a single cloth robe on a cute little animated figure, thereby reducing error and creating some of the nicest simulated cloth you’ll see today. They report… Read More

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