MIT

  • MIT scientists invent rapidly self-tinting windows

    MIT scientists invent rapidly self-tinting windows

    They’re more than just a big set of transitional lenses for buildings. For one thing, the new glass technology pioneered by a team of scientists at MIT is capable of changing shades much faster that what you’ll find on those ultra-hip eyeglasses. It also covers a broader spectrum of opacity than such photochromic substances. The material also differs from the electrochromic… Read More

  • MIT creates a chip that simulates the connection between nerves and muscle

    MIT creates a chip that simulates the connection between nerves and muscle

    In an attempt to better understand neuromuscular conditions like ALS, engineers at MIT have developed a quarter-sized chip housing a muscle strip and some motor neurons. The setup is designed to recreate the neuromuscular junction, the bit of chemical synapse where neurons and muscle fibers meet. The team has developed a method for creating muscle response by shining a light onto the neuron… Read More

  • MIT creates video you can reach out and touch

    MIT creates video you can reach out and touch

    Strictly speaking, video isn’t an interactive medium, but a new research project from MIT aims to change that: The school’s CSAIL lab has come up with a technique through which viewers can reach out and “touch” objects in videos, manipulating them directly to achieve effects similar to what you’d expect if you were actually touching the object live in the real… Read More

  • MIT researchers develop a low-cost device to monitor home power consumption

    MIT researchers develop a low-cost device to monitor home power consumption

    A team of researchers at MIT has developed a device designed to give home owners a better picture of how much power their individual appliances are eating up. The gadget, which was outlined in a paper published in a recent edition of the IEEE Sensors Journal, offers a simple installation process that involves securing it over a power line with a zip tie. Read More

  • Scientists are studying ant colonies to create better network analysis

    Scientists are studying ant colonies to create better network analysis

    Ants are really good at lots of things. Lifting, communicating, ruining picnics. Turns out they’ve got the whole voting thing down to a science, too. When time comes to move nests, the plucky little insects vote by quorum. The democratic process is determined, at least in part, by how often they bump into one another. Scientists believe that ants have a knack for determining their… Read More

  • MIT’s anonymous online communications protocol Riffle could beat Tor at its own game

    MIT’s anonymous online communications protocol Riffle could beat Tor at its own game

    Tor has been the go-to for anonymous communication online for years now — and that has made it one of the juiciest targets possible to the likes of the NSA and FBI. A new anonymizing protocol from MIT may prove more resilient against such determined and deep-pocketed attackers. Read More

  • MIT researchers develop wearable toxic gas sensor

    MIT researchers develop wearable toxic gas sensor

    A team of four MIT researchers has developed a new wearable sensor that can detect toxic gases and talk to smartphones or other wireless devices to warn users when they are in danger. Using these sensors, the researchers hope to design badges that weigh less than a credit card and can be easily worn by military personnel on the battlefield. “Soldiers carry a lot of equipment already, and… Read More

  • How the ancient art of origami is inspiring cutting-edge technology Crunch Network

    How the ancient art of origami is inspiring cutting-edge technology

    The future is always being shaped by the past. Long before the 3D printer, origami was the original genius at creating lifelike forms out of a flat surface. Folding brings with it the ability to collapse, flex and unfurl structures at will, which has huge potential for a variety of engineering applications. From digestible origami pills that could provide alternatives to invasive surgery to… Read More

  • Bio
    Analog computing and biological simulations get a boost from new MIT compiler

    Analog computing and biological simulations get a boost from new MIT compiler

    Life, uh, finds a way. And more often than not, that way is analog. Digital simulations of cells and systems struggle to take that into account. Analog electronic circuits are a powerful tool to bring to bear on these difficult problems — and a new compiler from MIT makes programming them much, much easier. Read More

  • Gravitational waves have been detected for the second time in history

    Gravitational waves have been detected for the second time in history

    For the second time in history, scientists have directly detected gravitational waves. And just like that, a new era of astronomy is underway. Like the first gravitational wave detected, scientists believe that the signal was created by the collision of two black holes, albeit a completely different binary black hole system than the first. Both signals were detected at the Laser… Read More

  • Crowdsourced data can teach your phone to follow your eyes Crunch Network

    Crowdsourced data can teach your phone to follow your eyes

    Eye tracking has always been a tough problem. Multi-camera solutions existed in order to sense the position of the eyes in 3D space, but in general watching where your peepers pointed was too hard for cellphones. Now researchers at MIT and the University of Georgia have created an eye-tracking system that depends on crowdsourced data. The team created a simple app that showed a dot on the… Read More