MIT

  • Crunch Report | Facebook Builds a Censorship Tool

    Facebook builds a censorship tool so it could not be banned from China anymore, Twitter suspends Jack Dorsey’s Twitter account, your headphones can be hacked to listen to you, MIT creates artificial muscles and Ditto is now in Pokémon GO. All this on Crunch Report. Read More

  • MIT’s new nylon muscles could lead to actual Westworld hosts

    MIT’s new nylon muscles could lead to actual Westworld hosts

    MIT has a new nylon-based artificial muscle-like filament created by researchers that could eventually provide the basis for robots with bulging biceps. The filaments themselves look eerily similar to the ones extruded by the 3D printers used in the opening sequence of HBO’s Westworld, which is why Gizmodo and others are seeing parallels between potential applications of the tech and… Read More

  • MIT helped make a nightmare machine

    MIT helped make a nightmare machine

    Some scientists devote themselves to curing diseases. Others are researching an end to famine or global climate change. And some spend their time making nightmare machines, deep learning algorithms that utilize Artificial Intelligence to tap into humans’ deepest and darkest fears. Like Google’s Deep Dream, only with way more dangling, bloodied flesh. MIT teamed up with… Read More

  • ‘The Engine’ is MIT’s incubator for tech and science companies straight out of the lab

    ‘The Engine’ is MIT’s incubator for tech and science companies straight out of the lab

    MIT is getting into the incubator business in a big way with “The Engine,” a major fund and accelerator space aimed at nurturing early-stage companies solving big, difficult problems in tech and science. After The Engine raises its targeted $150 million fund, up to 60 companies at a time will benefit from the university’s equipment, services and considerable pool of expertise. Read More

  • Bio
    CRISPR loses Nobel to tiny machines

    CRISPR loses Nobel to tiny machines

    CRISPR, the gene-editing technology revolutionizing the biotech industry, has failed to take home the Nobel prize in chemistry for the second year in a row. Instead, the award went to Jean-Pierre Sauvage, J. Fraser Stoddart, and Bernard L. Feringa – three men who developed the world’s smallest machines using molecular physics. Each will share equally in the 8 million Swedish kronor… Read More

  • MIT looks to beavers for new wetsuit material design

    MIT looks to beavers for new wetsuit material design

    Get ready for furry surfers: MIT engineers have created “fur-like, rubbery pelts” that mimic the insulating behaviors exhibited by beavers. The new design could pave the way for more effective wetsuits, which can insulate human bodies in cold water, but also quickly dry off for time spent up in the air. The concept of a warm, dry wetsuit is a surfer’s perfect dream… Read More

  • MIT’s new 3D-printed, shock-absorbent materials make for resilient drones

    MIT’s new 3D-printed, shock-absorbent materials make for resilient drones

    It’s not the fall, it’s the sudden stop – the effect of an impact has similar negative effects on people and on the sensitive electronic parts of robots. A new research project from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab could help lessen the damaging effects of sudden physical shocks, for both humans and robots alike. The new technique devised by the… Read More

  • Stanford, MIT lead in graduating funded startup founders Crunch Network

    Stanford, MIT lead in graduating funded startup founders

    Certain universities are known to produce a high number of funded startup founders. These schools tend to share certain qualities: prestige, large STEM programs, research prowess and proximity to concentrations of investor capital.   At CrunchBase, we set out to quantify the comparative track records of such institutions. We started with a list of top U.S. research universities. Using… Read More

  • This MIT device can tell if you’re happy, sad or angry using wireless signals

    This MIT device can tell if you’re happy, sad or angry using wireless signals

    Photographic cues have helped systems like Microsoft’s Emotion API detect human feelings with decent accuracy, but a new research project from MIT’s Computers Science and Artificial Intelligence lab can interpret emotions with a greater degree of accuracy, using only wireless radio signals. Researchers at CSAIL have created a device they call the EQ-Radio, which can pick up… Read More

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