law

  • Apple sends baseless takedown notice to hackers discussing iTunesDB code

    It’s no secret that Apple wants everyone to use iTunes, especially to sync with their iPod. I personally can’t stand iTunes and prefer Winamp, and many others share my view but have enjoyed Apple hardware. Some more code-savvy people than myself have in years past determined how to read and write to the proprietary iTunesDB file, allowing non-Apple software to sync with… Read More

  • Judge: Papermaster could cause "irreparable harm" to IBM at Apple


    When this legal melee began earlier this month, I guessed that the judge was simply taking IBM at its word and ordering Papermaster to stop work essentially at their whim. Well, you can’t blame me for underestimating the Judicial Branch, can you? Recently revealed records show that the judge had pretty solid reasoning for believing Papermaster was a serious threat to IBM in his new… Read More

  • Cellphone jammers come under scrutiny in Canada

    We can jokingly say things like “buy a cellphone jammer to silence those annoying people on the bus” but that would be irresponsible. Quite irresponsible, it turns out, as criminals are now using such devices to impede law enforcement efforts. It happened last month in Canada. Two Mounties had pulled over a car, and as they approached to car their radios went out. It turns out that… Read More

  • Kodak suing Samsung and LG over patent infringement

    Good lord, sir. There are so many lawsuits about that you can’t swing a cat without hitting a lawyer. IBM is suing Papermaster, Papermaster is suing IBM, Apple and Psystar are suing each other, the US is suing LCD makers, Spansion is suing Samsung, and god knows what else just from the last couple weeks has escaped my memory.
    And now Kodak is getting in on the feeding frenzy, and is… Read More

  • Papermaster countersues IBM – it's getting nasty!


    Papermaster doin’ it for his self! Well, his lawyers are helping. They’ve produced a somewhat scattershot countersuit against IBM, which if you don’t remember, sued the man for supposedly breaching a non-competition agreement in his contract. Papermaster’s corner says that not only is the non-comp clause “unreasonably broad,” but the statute of limitations… Read More

  • The Papermaster saga continues: far from first choice, and IBM didn't try that hard to keep him


    Yeah…a play on “Boston Legal” probably would have been better (and easier)
    The ongoing drama between Apple and IBM in which would-be iPod and iPhone division head Mark Papermaster is charged with breaching a non-competition contract with IBM is getting more complicated. On the Apple side, it’s no great surprise to find out that he was considered rather a… Read More

  • LG, Sharp, and Chunghwa nailed for LCD price-fixing


    Such shameful conduct! It looks like from 2001 to 2006, LG, Sharp, and Chinese OEM Chunghwa were conspiring to keep the prices of LCD screens high and agreed on pricing floors to guarantee cash flow for everybody involved. Over five years of first- and second-party sales (Dell and Apple were among the buyers), they must have run up quite a tab, although no one’s done the math yet. Read More

  • Jury: Samsung violated Pioneer's plasma TV patents, has to pay $59 million

    A federal jury found yesterday that Samsung willfully infringed two of Pioneer’s patents covering plasma televisions. As such, the Korean electronics giant will have to cough up (“cough up” is the technical term, mind you) some $59 million, payable to Pioneer. As you might expect, Samsung plans to appeal the ruling forever and ever. Sorta interesting: a Japanese… Read More

  • France one step closer to kicking file sharers off the Internet

    French pirates may want to think twice about downloading that episode Entourage off the Pirate Bay. A new law just passed the Sénat that would cut file-sharers off the Internet. Those caught illegally sharing material, be it music, movies, software, or whatever else, will be warned, both by e-mail and regular mail. After two such warnings your connection is shut off. Under the law, a new… Read More

  • Judge calls out RIAA lawyers for bankrupting families

    Go ahead and read this court transcript. It’s a 35-page PDF of the London-Sire Records. Does 1-4 copyright infringement case. It’s the same song and dance you’re all familiar with: RIAA catches someone downloading a song, which entitles it to thousands upon thousands of dollars in remuneration. Only this time, the presiding judge, Nancy Gertner of the U.S. District Court for… Read More

  • Student trying to alert school to computer vulnerability instead charged with three felonies

    Dear school administrators, What’s the best way to ensure that your computer network remains riddled with security vulnerabilities that leave you, your personnel and [someone think of the] schoolchildren in danger? Why, to demonize the student who discovered the vulnerability and alerted you to it, of course. Have him charged with a felony while you’re at it. A student in a… Read More

  • Wow, colleges are spending a lot of money to combat P2P

    How much does it cost to monitor college students’ anti-American P2P activities? A whole lot, and that’s money colleges could be spending on, I don’t know, education. This chart breaks down the cost of complying with, specifically, the new provisions of the Higher Education Act of 2008. That law, which the RIAA and MPAA were able to lobby their way into, requires colleges try… Read More

  • Judge upholds stop on RealDVD sales: Don't expect to see it for a long time (if ever)

    Like Achilles, it looks like RealDVD has lived a short but glorious life. Its name will echo for eternity. And so on, and so forth. Right, so that judge that RealNetworks was so confident would rule in its favor did the exact opposite, ruling in favor of the movie studios. The temporary injunction on the sales of RealDVD will go on indefinitely; the odds of RealDVD coming back, especially… Read More

  • Brain fingerprinting could replace conventional lie detectors

    Being that lie detectors are complete wastes of space, law enforcement needs, you know, something that actually works. That something could well be brain fingerprinting, which measures brainwave activity to determine if someone is telling the truth or not. VentureBeat puts it in easy-t-understand terms. Imagine you viciously murder someone with an axe. Then, when the police are questioning… Read More

  • Spam for breakfast

    Yesterday, the Virginia Supreme Court ruled the state’s anti-spam law unconstitutional. Good news to the ears of Jeremy Jaynes who gets a free pass. The spammer was previously convicted as the first felony spammer in the country in a 2004 trial. He had been sentenced to nine years. Ugh. It’s still morning here on the West Coast. Read More

  • Woman ordered to pay $6,050 for downloading 8 songs

    A Bronx woman will have to pay the RIAA $6,050 for making songs available to download on Kazaa. That works out to something like $756 per song (there were eight songs in question). The case, Electra v. Barker, matters a little more than serving as anti-RIAA fodder. The RIAA was trying to argue that merely making songs available in a shared folder was tantamount to copyright infringement. If… Read More

  • Anti-P2P provisions in college funding bill

    The Senate has passed the Higher Education Act (the House passed it earlier this year), which, among other things, provides for federal monies for student loans. What’s most interesting to us here is a provision in the bill, which it’s expected that President Bush will sign into law, that tells college campuses to rein in wanton P2P downloading. To that end, the MPAA will… Read More

  • Trouble cancelling your MMO account? Have a law passed, duh

    Long story short: some kid got tired of playing Final Fantasy XI, and tried to cancel his account. His parents couldn’t cancel from the game’s Web site, and had to—gasp!—call the number found on the credit card statement. The kid’s dad is a bigwig in his state (Illinois), who got his legislator friend to help pass a law stating that online service providers… Read More

  • Department of Homeland Security can search through your laptop at border crossings


    A more perfect union~! How much do you trust the Department of Homeland Security? Like, a lot, or a lot lot? Doesn’t matter, really—it now has the right to riffle through your laptop, iPod and other electronic (and non-electronic) devices and documents when you cross a border coming into the U.S. To Liberty! Yes, the DHS now has the right to riffle through your junk at the border… Read More

  • Adult-rated games being nixed from some British jails and prisons


    Yeah… those are some l33t photoshop skillz. I guess Don’t Drop the Soap Saga XII and the latest Battle Raper (I wish I was kidding) have been deemed poisonous to the minds ostensibly being rehabilitated by Britain’s overcrowded prison system. Games have been a privilege among institutions for some time now but budget cuts have caused the console-buying programs to be… Read More

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