Aaron PAtzer
mint.com

Mint.com Tops 10 Million Registered Users, 70% Use Mobile

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Mint.com, a financial planning app that was a TC40 winner and acquired by Intuit in 2009, has just announced it has surpassed 10 million registered users. This is pretty incredible growth considering the company only had about 1.7 million users when it was acquired nearly three years ago.

The service is tracking more than $80 billion in credit and debit transactions and almost $1 trillion in loans and assets.

Founder Aaron Patzer explained that distribution channels have blown up since Mint.com joined the Intuit umbrella. “Every spring tax season is a great gift,” said Patzer. “We distribute with Turbo Tax, and Turbo Tax markets itself with us.”

Much of this growth has to do with the resources offered from Intuit. Mint has always been available for most of the major banks, and even many of the smaller ones, but the number of banks the service integrates with has grown from around 8,000 to 15,000 with the help of Intuit.

Patzer also said that mobile is a huge factor for the company. You have to remember, Mint.com launched in September of 2007, right around the time the first iPhone was being launched.

Back then, the significance of mobile was just dawning on founders. But Patzer and the company made a push, and have since launched iOS and Android apps, and added the ability to do just about anything from your phone, including adding new banks and changing budgets.

In terms of user acquisition, 70 percent of users now use iPhone and iPad either as their main Mint portal or alongside the website. “I imagine that’s been the case for everyone,” said Patzer. “There’s been a huge transition in the past few years.”

He even admitted that the mobile experience is now driving design decisions for the web interface, with new HTML5 graphs and charts.

I also drilled Patzer about NFC, considering that an NFC-enabled iPhone has been the topic of many a discussion.

“NFC is the Holy Grail that I’ve been waiting for for ten years,” said Patzer. “It’s one of those things that’s already affected logistics and shipping inventory, so I’m glad to see it in the consumer space. I think it’ll be adopted more slowly than people imagine, though. Swiping a piece of plastic is a quick operation.”

But does Mint have an NFC-based offering in the works?

“Nothing I can comment on,” said Patzer.