entrepreneurship

  • The Poet, Scientist, Journalist, Boxer Approach To Entrepreneurship

    The Poet, Scientist, Journalist, Boxer Approach To Entrepreneurship

    One of the great challenges for startups is figuring out where to start. Entrepreneurs believe that unless they build something now, their idea will become outdated or stolen by their competitor. However, that thought process is akin to running a marathon with one month of training. Yes, it can be done, but you run the risk of burning out and failing more quickly. What is needed is a… Read More

  • Selling Hopes And Dreams In Southeast Asia

    Selling Hopes And Dreams In Southeast Asia

    Being a startup means believing in your dreams, and Southeast Asia needs dreamers, say incubators. 500 Startups, for one, is keen to sell hope to the growing communities of startups in Southeast Asia, and is willing to back that up with real money. When I spoke with its founder, Dave McClure, in Jakarta a couple of months ago, he said the accelerator’s plan for the region starts with… Read More

  • Entrepreneurial Excellence: Can 10,000 Hours Of Practice Make Perfect?

    Entrepreneurial Excellence: Can 10,000 Hours Of Practice Make Perfect?

    Editor’s note: Jon Auerbach is a partner at Charles River Ventures, a 42-year-old early stage venture firm based in Menlo Park and Cambridge, Ma, where he focuses on mobile technologies. Research over the past two decades has identified a strong link between hours of practice and expertise in sports, chess and the performing arts. In the early 1990s, Anders Ericsson, a psychologist… Read More

  • From Team Player To Coach = From Entrepreneur To CEO

    From Team Player To Coach = From Entrepreneur To CEO

    For entrepreneurs, navigating a career through the Valley can be a lot like competitive sports. Similarities include locker room leadership, a shifting playbook and ongoing onslaughts from opponents. What is perhaps the most important likeness to highlight, however, is the requisite sense of what your place is in the game. The differences between each role in a company and team are… Read More

  • How Entrepreneurs Can Create Their Own Luck

    How Entrepreneurs Can Create Their Own Luck

    I’m in even worse trouble now. A few weeks ago I had to speak at Barry Ritholz’s conference but that turned out to be “only” a panel. It was a great panel but I knew I would only have ten minutes of time so wouldn’t need to prepare much although even then I was worried. Now I’m speaking for one hour at Defrag in Boulder, Colorado next week on November 9… Read More

  • The Long Hard Road To The Edge

    The Long Hard Road To The Edge

    A Year In The Life Of An Entrepeneur 1. July 2010: Ready: Set: Delaware, the state with the lowest highest point. David Argentar, a biochemist by training and bioinformaticist by trade, has launched a startup. Of sorts. Well – more of a hobby, he’d be the first to admit. He has no business plan, no investors, no employees. All he really has, in fact, is an idea and a pending patent. Read More

  • What To Do When A Tech Giant Decides To Eat Your Lunch

    What To Do When A Tech Giant Decides To Eat Your Lunch

    Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by (@msuster) Mark Suster, a 2x entrepreneur, now VC at GRP Partners. Read more about Suster at Bothsidesofthetable Any company who develops products reliant on iOS spends weeks crapping their pants before WWDC. No vacation schedules allowed for weeks before or weeks after. The announcements come out in one day and then even if you survive the… Read More

  • Is There A Peak Age for Entrepreneurship?

    Is There A Peak Age for Entrepreneurship?

    Editor’s note: Adeo Ressi, is the founder of The Founder Institute and TheFunded.com In this guest post he argues against ageism when it comes to to entrepreneurs. Ressi is 39. The recent articles proclaiming that 25 is the peak age for entrepreneurship deserve a considered and factual response. The demographic and racial profiling that has plagued venture capital and tech… Read More

  • You Need to Win the Battle for Share of Mind

    You Need to Win the Battle for Share of Mind

    Editor’s Note: This is a guest post by (@msuster) Mark Suster, a 2x entrepreneur, now VC at GRP Partners. Read more about Suster at Bothsidesofthetable Are we headed for a long era of innovation in which startups are the new norm? Are we seeing a time in which pre-revenue companies are more valuable than our offline institutional brands? Yes, there is unprecedented innovation. The era… Read More

  • Women of Color in Tech: How Can We Encourage Them?

    Over the last five years, I have taught more than 300 really smart students. One of the smartest, at the Masters of Engineering Management at Duke University, was Viva Leigh Miller, a black woman. She had the ambition of moving to Silicon Valley after she graduated last year. I expected she would become a hotshot CEO. But Viva couldn’t get a job in the Valley—despite introductions… Read More

  • Friends Don’t Let Friends Get Into Finance


    After having been a tech executive for many years, I needed to take a break, and I wanted to give back to society. Duke University engineering dean Kristina Johnson gave me a great spiel about how the school’s Masters of Engineering Management program churns out great engineers, and how engineers solve the world’s problems. She said that I could make a big impact by teaching… Read More

  • My Ordeal—and the Firestorm—in Boston

    As TechCrunch readers know by now, I speak my mind and don’t shy away from controversy. I am even more provocative when I talk to students. My goal is to make them think outside the box. I encourage students not only to challenge authority, but also to challenge me. I tell them that with my research on globalization, entrepreneurship, and U.S. competitiveness, I am learning as I go; no… Read More

  • What Exactly is a Business Model?

    Everyone in the tech world talks about business models. But I’ll bet that if you quizzed a random sample of these people, you’d find that they really don’t know what a business model is. I did just that with my students at UC-Berkeley. Most raised their hands, and MBA student Blake Brundidge’s attempt to answer the question was a valiant one—but none of them… Read More

  • Chile’s Grand Innovation Experiment


    Regions all over the world have spent millions—sometimes billions—of dollars trying to create their own Silicon Valley. They drank the same Kool-Aid and used the same recipe: start with a research university; build a fancy tech park next it; give tax breaks to chosen companies to locate in the park; attract venture capital by offering matching investments; and watch the magic… Read More

  • How China’s Entrepreneurs Are Helping It Win

    Bob Compton and I finally have something to agree about. The Washington, D.C.–based venture capitalist produced a provocative documentary, 2 Million Minutes, which tracked six students—two each in the U.S., India, and China—during their senior year of high school. It showed the Indian and Chinese students slogging to learn mathematics and science, and the Americans partying… Read More

  • Are You A Pirate?

    Are You A Pirate?

    I read blog posts by Don Dodge and Glenn Kelman today about people jumping from Google to Facebook and it got me thinking about entrepreneurs. Most people have an aversion to risk, my college economics professor told me. Which means they have to be rewarded to take on that risk. The higher the risk, the higher the possible payout has to be for people to jump. We make risk/reward decisions… Read More

  • The Goldmine Of Opportunities In Gov 2.0

    The Goldmine Of Opportunities In Gov 2.0


    Seeing a need to help 60 million Americans manage their $4 trillion dollars in retirement accounts, Mike and Ryan Alfred launched BrightScope in 2008. They headed to Washington, DC, to obtain electronic data on 401K plans from the Department of Labor. They assumed that since every employer is required to provide the government with this information, it would be readily available to any… Read More

  • Japan: To Fix Your Economy, Honor Your Failed Entrepreneurs


    After visiting Okinawa, Japan, and meeting with global experts on innovation, I’ve come to the conclusion that Silicon Valley’s greatest advantage isn’t its diversity; it is the fact that it accepts and glorifies failure. Like many other countries, Japan has tried replicating Silicon Valley. It built fancy tech parks, provided subsidies for R&D, and even created a… Read More

  • Men and Women Entrepreneurs: Not That Different

    Men and Women Entrepreneurs: Not That Different


    In any debate, it is easy to revert to anecdote and highlight examples that exemplify one point of view. Recent TechCrunch posts about women in tech have done just that. The latest of these claimed that women don’t want to run startups, because they’d rather have children. I can understand why: TechCrunch and its editors focus on the Silicon Valley/Web 2.0 world. In this world… Read More

  • Should Entrepreneurs Bet It All On The Billion Dollar Exit, Or Cash Out Small?


    One of the most interesting discussions at TechCrunch’s Disrupt conference was the debate between the “super angels” and VCs. No, I’m not referring to “AngelGate” or the question of which investor group squeezes entrepreneurs the most. Despite what they say, all investors are in the game for personal financial gain; it’s not about nurturing… Read More

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