Jon Evans

Jon Evans

Jon Evans is a novelist, journalist, and software engineer. His novels have been published around the world, translated into several languages, and praised by The Times, The Economist, and the Washington Post. His journalism has appeared in Wired, Reader's Digest, The Guardian, The Globe & Mail, and The Times of India, and he writes a weekly column for TechCrunch. Jon also has a degree in electrical engineering and a decade of experience as a software developer, building everything from smartphone apps to billion-dollar asset-allocation services.

CrunchBase profile →

Featured Picks from Jon Evans


Latest from Jon Evans

  • Welcome To The Panopticon

    Welcome To The Panopticon

    And so it begins. Carnegie Mellon researchers recently combined Facebook profile pictures and PittPatt‘s facial recognition software to identify supposedly-anonymous pictures from a dating site. Now they’re planning to demo a smartphone app that identifies faces by tapping into cloud-based image databases and recognition software. What’s next? That’s a question… Read More

  • Technology + Politics = Facepalm

    Technology + Politics = Facepalm

    Oh, how embarrassing. Earlier this week, Elizabeth May, the leader of Canada’s Green Party, took to her Twitter account and declared war on wi-fi. To think I very nearly voted for these clowns in our recent election. Lesson for my American friends: just because you find all the major parties unpalatable doesn’t mean that the fringe parties aren’t even worse. Meanwhile… Read More

  • Google Plus Has A Problem. Fear Not: I Have A Solution

    Google Plus Has A Problem. Fear Not: I Have A Solution

    Google Plus is terrific. I don’t think it will ever be more than the Pepsi to Facebook’s Coke, alas, but it’s much slicker and better designed. It’s too bad that the service has sacrificed a pile of goodwill over the last week by repeatedly publicly shooting themselves in the foot. First there was the brands mistake. Now it’s gotten much worse: it seems… Read More

  • Intelligence Agencies Keep Getting Dumber

    Intelligence Agencies Keep Getting Dumber

    I’m in Mumbai. A few days ago, homemade bombs killed nineteen(1) people only blocks away from the Internet cafe in which I’m writing this, the latest in an eighteen-year string of terrorist attacks on India’s busy commercial capital. And how have the authorities reacted? With sheer idiocy. Today, highway signs advised Mumbai’s population: PLS. AVOID GOING TO CROWDED… Read More

  • Power To The People

    Power To The People

    As I type this, a UPS beeps furiously behind me, and the growl of half-a-dozen diesel generators is audible down the street. I’m in Leh, a city nestled in a Himalayan valley surrounded by 6,000-metre / 20,000-foot peaks, the fast-growing capital of India’s northernmost territory Ladakh. It’s clearly outgrown its electrical capacity; power cuts hit several times a… Read More

  • The Phoenix And The Dragon

    The Phoenix And The Dragon

    I’m in India. It’s a glorious mess. The streets of Delhi remain a seething, endless vortex of chaos, as they were when I last visited eleven years ago, but nowadays, gleaming new highways, shopping malls, and five-star hotels rise above them. The sleek and efficient new metro system carries millions of people a day, but leaks in the monsoon rains. The suburb of Gurgaon looks… Read More

  • Revolutions On The Road

    Revolutions On The Road

    I almost miss the bad old days. When I first started wandering around some of the more obscure nooks and crannies of this planet, lo these many years ago, Internet connections were rare and wonderful discoveries; now I just get annoyed when I can’t get online. The last decade-and-a-half of innovation has completely transformed the experience of travel. Right now I’m in the middle of… Read More

  • Is The World Crazy For Bitcoin, Or Has The Bitcoin World Gone Crazy?

    Is The World Crazy For Bitcoin, Or Has The Bitcoin World Gone Crazy?

    I last wrote about Bitcoin less than a month ago. (If you’re one of the people who admitted in comments “I still don’t get it,” here’s a terrific and detailed explainer from The Economist.) Since then the value of Bitcoins has quadrupled—and then halved. The founder of Sweden’s Pirate Party moved all his savings into Bitcoin (which disappoints me; I… Read More

  • And Now For Some Unexpectedly Good News

    And Now For Some Unexpectedly Good News

    Don’t look now, but sub-Saharan Africa is booming. Since 2003 its growth has been skyrocketing, and, to quote none other than McKinsey, “today the rate of return on foreign investment in Africa is higher than in any other developing region.” There are several reasons: commodity prices, Chinese investment, diaspora remittances… and, I would argue, the GSM revolution that… Read More

  • This Is Where The Magic Happens

    This Is Where The Magic Happens

    Seventeen years ago Wired published Neal Stephenson’s magisterial epic “Mother Earth Mother Board”, about the web of undersea fibre-optic cables being built to connect all of humanity. Well – almost all. Africa, again, was left behind. Until 2009, all of East Africa could only connect to the Internet over slow and hugely expensive satellite links. Finally, two years… Read More

  • The Unconquered Nation, Crippled By Bureaucrats

    The Unconquered Nation, Crippled By Bureaucrats

    Seems like it’s Sub-Saharan Month around here: first Sarah Lacy went to Nigeria, and now here I am in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia’s capital and Africa’s fourth-largest city. It feels like a boomtown. There are cranes and construction sites everywhere, throwing up gleaming new glass-and-steel buildings full of shops selling computers and mobile phones. The major thoroughfares… Read More

  • Make.Money.Slow : The Bitcoin Experiment

    Make.Money.Slow : The Bitcoin Experiment

    Bitcoin. Oh, man, where to begin. Its Hype-O-Meter got cranked to 11 this week, and breathless histrionics are everywhere. Death and Taxes called this new currency “a seismic event“; Adam Cohen says it’s nothing but a giant scam; Jason Calacanis calls it “the most dangerous project we’ve ever seen“; and they’re all completely wrong. It’s… Read More

  • When Dinosaurs Ruled The Books

    When Dinosaurs Ruled The Books

    This is a really weird time to be a writer. Agents are becoming publishers; publishers have moved to “the agency model“; and some self-published authors are making millions—all because e-books are now outselling all other segments. Magazines and newspapers are dying, blogs and aggregators are thriving, and the line between them all is blurring. Last year Apple was their… Read More

  • Why The New Guy Can’t Code

    Why The New Guy Can’t Code

    We’ve all lived the nightmare. A new developer shows up at work, and you try to be welcoming, but he1 can’t seem to get up to speed; the questions he asks reveal basic ignorance; and his work, when it finally emerges, is so kludgey that it ultimately must be rewritten from scratch by more competent people. And yet his interviewers—and/or the HR department, if your company… Read More

  • The Cloud Has Us All In A Fog

    The Cloud Has Us All In A Fog

    Ever heard of Dropship? It’s an open-source project that “enables arbitrary, anonymous transfers of files between Dropbox accounts.” Dropbox hopes you haven’t; they tried to squelch it this week, and even accidentally reported that it was subject to a DMCA takedown notice, with predictably futile results. I’m mostly sympathetic: I’m a huge fan of their… Read More

  • If Music Be Thy Dream Of Filthy Lucre, Press Stop

    If Music Be Thy Dream Of Filthy Lucre, Press Stop

    I always enjoy seeing science fiction prophecies come true. Last month, Broadcastr. This month, Wolfram Alpha’s WolframTones, modestly subtitled “A New Kind Of Music.” (Yes, that would be the same breathtaking humility that led them to originally price the Wolfram Alpha app at a hilarious $50. Fortunately, they subsequently bought a clue.) It is pretty cool, in a geeky sort… Read More

  • What App Developers Want: Letters To Steve Jobs And Larry Page

    What App Developers Want: Letters To Steve Jobs And Larry Page

    The next smartphone wave is about to hit. There are rumors that Android 3.1 (Ice Cream Sandwich) will drop in May, and iOS 5 in June. Greg already posted a pretty compelling user’s wish list for the latter, but what developers want is at least as important—because, as the lukewarm-to-appalled recent PlayBook reviews show, it hardly matters how great your hardware is. Nowadays… Read More

  • TxtEagle Raises $8.5 Million To Give 2.1 Billion A Voice

    TxtEagle Raises $8.5 Million To Give 2.1 Billion A Voice

    Never mind tablets, smartphones, and mobile-social-location-photo-sharing apps. Heck, never mind computers. The single most important technology of the last half-century, the one that has drastically changed the day-to-day existence of very nearly everyone on Earth, remains the plain old GSM phone; unloved and half-forgotten in NYC and Silicon Valley, but still used by the billion in the rest… Read More

  • Guardly Watches Your Back, From The Mean Streets Of Toronto

    Guardly Watches Your Back, From The Mean Streets Of Toronto

    I can’t help but be amused that the personal-security platform Guardly, which launches today, was born in virtually-crime-free Toronto, where I live, and where I’ve never encountered anything more fearsome than bad weather. (Q: How do you get 20 Canadians out of a pool? A: “C’mon, guys, get out of the pool.”) Security is a big market, though: there are a lot of… Read More

  • Facebook Comments Epitomizes Everything I Hate About Facebook

    Facebook Comments Epitomizes Everything I Hate About Facebook

    It’s been a month since we introduced Facebook Comments round these parts, time enough to have given it some serious consideration. And my conclusions are as follows: …are you kidding me? This is the best a $75 billion company could come up with? Isn’t Facebook supposed to be the new home of software’s best and brightest? Is this some kind of elaborate practical… Read More