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Galaxy S5 Prime

Samsung Galaxy S5 ‘Prime’ Could Bring A Premium Bump To The Android Flagship In June

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In a somewhat unusual move, Samsung is rumored to be planning a premium version of their already high-end Galaxy S5 Android smartphone. That device could arrive as early as June, according to a new report from Asia Today (via SamMobile) and might include a 2560×1440 display (better than the full HD screen on the GS5) as well as an eight-core processor and possibly a metal (or at least metallic finish) case.

The metal build GS5 would mark a significant departure for Samsung, which has faithfully stuck to their plastic back and border on Galaxy devices, despite competitors like HTC and Sony moving to more premium metal and glass (following Apple’s example). And the better-than specs that step up from the Galaxy S5 released just this month would be a departure from the company’s usually strategy of releasing a number of variants of their flagship, but usually aimed at lower price points and actually shedding some specs relative to the top-tier device.

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 Prime is already a bit of a known quantity, thanks to leaked references to the gadget and its specs from Samsung’s own site, as well as a preview of the specs from often-accurate analyst Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI Securities. It would make a lot of sense for Samsung to release a second, even more improved device this year in particular, given the relatively modest changes the GS5 introduced over the GS4, and the fact that this will probably be a year in which Apple introduces a significantly redesigned new iPhone, which could boast a bigger screen better able to woo Android users who are interested in more screen real estate.

A more premium device could also help Samsung make higher margins on top-end device sales, which in turn would balance out its efforts to appeal more to emerging markets with low-cost handsets. This gadget is still very much in the realm of speculation, however, so it’s a bit early yet to start predicting its effect on the Korean phone maker’s bottom line.