LinkedIn Hits 38% Of Unique Visits From Mobile, Up From 8% In Q1 2011

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LinkedIn is making the shift to mobile. It now sees 38 percent of unique visits from mobile, which is up from 8 percent in the first quarter of 2011, and users who access via mobile are 2.5x as active as desktop-only users. At an event in San Francisco this morning, CEO Jeff Weiner said LinkedIn will release a slew of new mobile apps.

These new apps include an upgraded version of the Pulse news reader that integrates your LinkedIn info, an iPad redesign, but most excitingly, a new experience called Intro. It leans on LinkedIn’s acquisition Rapportive to integrate professional info from LinkedIn profiles directly into you Apple Mail app on your iPhone or iPad. Intro can show the LinkedIn profile photo, company, and job title of the people who you email with, and let you connect with them on LinkedIn.

Weiner expects LinkedIn to have its “mobile moment” with more than 50 percent of visits from mobile next year.

Some countries have already had that moment. Singapore is over 50 percent, and Australia is fast approaching at 45 percent.

For reference, YouTube announced that 40 percent of usage now comes from mobile, while Twitter sees 70 percent of ad revenue from mobile and Facebook sees 41 percent of ad revenue from mobile. It’s important to note that LinkedIn isn’t saying 38 percent of traffic is from mobile, as web users may spend more time per session browsing its professional graph.

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The company now has 3 million businesses and over a quarter-billion professionals with LinkedIn profiles. Though its profiles for schools and universities only launched six weeks ago, there are now 1,500 education outlet profiles on LinkedIn.

Those are just the first steps. “Our vision today is to develop the world’s first economic graph…[which will] map the global economy and and every economic opportunity in the world, either part-time or full-time,” Weiner says.

LinkedIn doesn’t just want to know where you’ve worked. It wants to know what’s the next job opening you’ll fill.