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Dropmysite Upgrades As It Moves Into Enterprise Market

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Dropmysite has beefed up its site backup product with new features, as it pushes harder into the enterprise market.

Its product now includes features like incremental backups, public key authentication and PostgreSQL database support, it said. Backups start at 10Gb for $19.99.

The Singaporean company was started in September 2011. But it was a side project, Dropmyemail that suddenly became a hit online and drew more attention over to Dropmysite. The email backup service was launched in March 2012, and promised to be an easy way to dump a backup copy of your webmail from services like Gmail and Yahoo onto its servers.

Three months later, the company announced it had 650,000 new users.

The feature upgrade to the parent product looks like it was a natural result of the company’s focus on enterprise deals. It’s been making deals with regional telcos and hosts in a mix of reselling and investing arrangements. This has allowed its financing to reach about $1.3 million (S$1.7 million) so far, according to Dropmysite.

In January, the company signed a deal with Japanese cloud provider GMO Cloud for the latter to both invest a “six-figure sum” in Dropmyemail and resell the service in Japan. GMO Cloud, which belongs to the GMO Group has a customer base of about 130,000 businesses and 6,000 sales partners in its country.

In addition to that, it has a deal with Xpress Hosting in Mexico, to resell into its Spanish-speaking user base. Xpress Hosting has about 600,000 sites on its servers.

Dropmysite indicated that it is in the final stages of closing a deal with a Singapore telco, and intends to reach out to the latter’s 150,000 small and medium business customers. The deal took eight months to iron out, it said.

Its next deal looks to be with a telco in India, as well.

Dropmysite is also trying to expand its offices. It bought cloud drive site Orbitfiles in June last year, grabbing its user base of 235,000 primarily in the US, and opened an office in Dallas in August. Prior to the Orbitfiles acquisition, its main customer base was in Asia, especially in India and Indonesia, followed by South America, it said.