Samsung’s $399, 16GB Galaxy Note 8.0 Will Launch In The U.S. On April 11

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After showing off the international version of its pint-sized Galaxy Note 8.0 back at Mobile World Congress, Samsung is gearing up to launch its newest Note tablet in the U.S. in just a few days. Just days after the device went on sale in the UK, Samsung has announced that the WiFi-only 16GB Galaxy Note 8.0 will officially hit U.S. store shelves on April 11 complete with a $399 price tag.

I’ve only been playing with the Note 8.0 for a few days so I feel it’s still a little premature to pass judgment on it, but my impressions haven’t changed much since the last time we spent some time together — it seems just as snappy as expected thanks to the inclusion of a 1.6GHz Exynos 4 Quad processor and 2GB of RAM, and the peculiar voice call feature was stripped out of the Note 8.0 while it was being prepared for a stateside launch. Oh, and in case you were curious, the 5-megapixel rear and 3-megapixel front camera were just as lousy as I remember them being, so you’re probably much better off relying on your phone’s camera.

To be perfectly honest though, I’m a little unsure about the device’s size, especially when the 10.1-inch version felt like the perfect size to show off what the whole Note concept was truly capable of. Don’t get me wrong, it’s perfectly adequate for jotting down notes and expanding emails thanks to the S-Pen, but sketching out that Bulbasaur took much longer than I had hoped because my meaty mitts obscured much of the 8-inch, 1280×800 display. Your mileage is certainly going to vary on that front though, so don’t write this thing off immediately.

Perhaps the biggest bummer at this point is that there’s currently on word on if or when any other variants will make their domestic debuts: after all, 16GB of internal storage isn’t much to work with (though it’ll take up to a 64GB microSD card), and Samsung has already confirmed that it’s working on 3G/LTE versions of the device that carriers will sell down the road.