Pandora Internet Radio Launches Fully In Australia And New Zealand With Mobile Apps For iOS And Android

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Pandora has fully launched in Australia and New Zealand, the only two places outside of the U.S. where the service is available in its entirety, with the addition of mobile access via iOS and Android apps today. Previously, the service was available in a limited form in both countries thanks to a web-only access trial, but now smartphone users can get in on the action.

The service, which provides personalized streaming radio stations for listeners, has created Australia and New Zealand-specific stations to tailor the experience to its newest markets, the company relayed in a press release. The company anticipates significant uptake of its new free mobile apps in these markets, since it says Australians and New Zealanders are “among the world’s most mobile-centric societies.” In the U.S., Pandora says 75 percent of usage of its service now occurs via mobile apps, with over 115 million of its 175 million stateside registered members having accessed either the iOS or Android apps. Australian and New Zealand users can grab the new mobile apps here.

Pandora began beta testing service in Australia and New Zealand back in July, and in October the company said it remains “patiently opportunistic” regarding further international rollouts. As part of today’s full Australian and New Zealand launch, the company is partnering with Holden to offer Pandora as part of its in-car infotainment systems, too. Holden is an Australia-based automaker that’s also a subsidiary of General Motors. Pandora also brings on Jane Huxley as its Managing Director for the two regions. Huxley previously worked as CEO and Publisher, Digital at Fairfax Media, an Australian company that publishes The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age and many more websites and print publications.

In an email interview, Pandora’s Amanda Livingood said that New Zealand and Australia proved a fitting market for their first international expansion for a number of reasons.

“The music market is very complex where payments, royalties and related issues are concerned and we’ve recently finalized everything we need to get the Pandora experience off the ground in Australia and New Zealand,” she wrote. “We know Australians and New Zealanders love both local and international music and we also know that they’re huge users of mobile devices and social media.”

Livingood also reiterated that the company is “patiently opportunistic” with regards to additional expansion, but beyond expressing a hope to one day be able to offer the service globally, declined to discuss in detail any future plans for the service’s continued rollout.