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This guest post is written by Vic Gundotra, Vice President of Engineering for Google’s mobile and developer products. (Prior to Google, he spent 15 years at Microsoft, most recently as their GM of Platform Evangelism.) Vic credits his now-7-year-old with forecasting the importance of mobile data access, and now carries at least 4 phones at all times. Fortunately, he had two kids before adopting the possibly-prophylactic habit.


Focus on the mobile user, and all else will follow

Simpler data, better browsers, and a smoother experience

Today the mobile industry finds itself in a unique position to do right by its users:

Worldwide phone penetration continues to climb at a break-neck pace, with over 4 billion mobile subscribers at last count.1 (In comparison, the PC industry is forecasted to see its sharpest unit decline in history.2) Prevailing economic conditions will accelerate this trend, as users consolidate pricey communication services into cost-effective, all-in-one mobile devices.3 And for the first time ever, half of all new connections to the internet will come from a phone in 2009.4

Google’s mobile traffic reflects these milestones — having quintupled since 20075 — and it underscores users’ appetite for mobile data services. But as a community of operators, device manufacturers and software providers, we continue to get in their way. In short, and as a general rule, we make it too costly, too unfamiliar, and too difficult to do anything beyond voice calls.

In reply I offer up three suggestions: simpler data plans, better web browsers, and a smoother on-device experience. And in each case I’ll use Google traffic numbers as a proxy for total internet usage and user happiness.

Disclaimer: As a Google employee using internal data to carry the weight of this article, I owe it to the reader to lay bare my economic incentives: the company I work for has a financial interest in the broad and sweeping adoption of the Internet-as-we-know-it. Indeed, more internet users leads to increased web usage, which often leads to more Google searches and downstream ad clicks. I use Google data because it’s what I know best, and because it reinforces my industry-facing remarks, but make no mistake: I’m fundamentally interested in what’s good for the mobile internet. It just so happens that this is also good for Google. With that said, I hope you’ll find value in the words and data that follow.

Flat is the new phat

Consider MetroPCS, a regional carrier in the United States with just over 5 million subscribers on their 2.5G CDMA network. Over the past year, their Google search volume grew over 2.5x more quickly than another global carrier with 10 times as many users, and a 3G network.6


Metro’s “secret” is a free month of web access at signup, with the option of flat-rate, unlimited data thereafter.7 As a result nearly half of Metro’s subscribers use the web on a regular basis. (It’s also worth mentioning that MetroPCS was recently recognized for excellence in customer satisfaction.8)

In contrast, many operators subject users to a labyrinthine set of data options, from pay-as-you-go to daily caps with significant overage charges. Now, can you imagine paying your at-home internet provider for every page load? Or needing to know the size of a website before visiting it? Or managing your monthly download quota across your entire household? It’s simply not practical, and it’s all the same internet, so why do we treat mobile users as second-class citizens? Case and point: my colleague’s January phone bill contained 27 pages of itemized data charges, spelled out in excruciating detail.9

Unless we declare flat the new phat — and soon — I fear Occam will do something terrible with his razor.

They want it all, they want it now

Users “get” the web, and they’ve known for over 10 years that the browser is the thing that takes you there. Likewise, more and more of today’s killer applications are the Amazons and Facebooks of the world, not software that you download to a local machine. So it should come as no surprise that mobile users want phones (and browsers) that put a fully-featured internet in their pocket.

For example: the availability of a modern web browser explains why iPhone and Android users — just 13% of the high-end market10 — represent nearly 50% of Google’s smartphone traffic worldwide.11


Similarly, users of the T-Mobile G1 and its newer WebKit browser search Google 20 times more often than Nokia Series 60 users.12


Both data indicate that it’s about usage — not just units — and this trend will continue unabated with more efficient JavaScript engines, and more sophisticated HTML5-compliant browsers.

The simple truth is that mobile users have wanted fast and full web access all along. Consider two quick facts about Google search behavior: the “tail” of PC and iPhone queries is significantly longer than that of feature phone queries;


and the gap in query diversity between desktop and high-end mobile devices is shrinking.13 People want all the world’s information on their most personal of personal computers, and we need to offer browsers that scratch this quintessential itch.

“One web will triumph.”14 Users want all of it. And they want it now.

Friction is fugly

In the early days of mobile search, customer feedback was clear: “I can’t find Google on my phone.” And in hindsight it makes sense: unintuitive device menus and preference panes mandated 20+ mind-numbing clicks just to locate portal content15 — nevermind “off net” sites like Google. This Frankenstein’s monster of OEM, carrier, and 3rd party software made it impossible to discover — much less enjoy — mobile data services, and showed a complete disregard for users’ on-device experience.

Thanks to an influx of smarter phones, many mobile users can now reach 3rd party software with a single tap or click. And in Google’s case, this desktop-like experience increases search traffic by many orders of multitude.16 Why? Because it provides a frictionless onramp to search results. Likewise, and prior to its v5.0 release in February 2009, Google Earth saw more activations on the day of its iPhone launch than any other day in the product’s history. Why? Because the iPhone’s App Store and on-screen layout make it easy to find, try and access mobile data services.

And herein lies the rub: users appreciate well-written software, but ease of use and on-device navigability are critical preconditions for usage. (After all, if you hide a tree in a forest, who cares whether someone hears it fall? Chances are they’ll never find it anyway.) The proliferation of app stores is a positive step in this direction, as are efforts on the part of OEMs to give developers unfettered access to low-level functionality.

We have to surprise and delight users with fast and fluid interfaces. Friction is just fugly.

– Sent from my Android phone, with a WebKit browser and an unlimited data plan


  1. ITU, 2009
  2. Gartner, 2009
  3. comScore, 2008
  4. eMarketer, 2008 and 2009
  5. Google internal
  6. Google internal
  7. MetroPCS, 2009
  8. J.D. Power, 2008
  9. January phone bill, redacted
  10. Canalys, 2008
  11. Google internal
  12. Google internal
  13. “Computers and iPhones and Mobile Phones, oh my!”, 2009
  14. Opera, 2008
  15. http://www.biz-lib.com/products/ZMOMX.html
  16. Google internal
  • christophe

    excellent analysis
    just one point on “Similarly, users of the T-Mobile G1 and its newer WebKit browser search Google 20 times more often than Nokia Series 60 users” : it is still normal with the result on search UI

    Christophe

    • no ads

      Problem with mobile is hardly any ads can be shown. Where’s the revenue other than google’s newuser-misleading “sponsored links”?

      Instead, public pc’s like cyber cafe or shared(with family or friends)-PC’s are the future. Cyber cafe’s to socialize ;)

      • Misery

        Cyber cafes…. For penniless travelers in transit. Yep, sounds like a winner to me!

    • http://redtulup.com Dmitri Smirnov

      Many customers hate to be charged for web-access on the phone, because carrier charge more when they can afford, if customer looking for a coupon to save 1-2$ on groceries, carrier charged 4.99 for web access plan, in this case customer choose not to use web plan, or they will use “flat rate” provider like Metro PCS, or provider with free “data plan”.

    • http://link Mr.Carrot82

      When I encounter problems at the bench, I use my computer to learn from other watchmakers. ,

  • christophe

    excellent analysis
    just one point on “Similarly, users of the T-Mobile G1 and its newer WebKit browser search Google 20 times more often than Nokia Series 60 users” : it is still normal with the result on search UI

    Christophe

    • no ads

      Problem with mobile is hardly any ads can be shown. Where’s the revenue other than google’s newuser-misleading “sponsored links”?

      Instead, public pc’s like cyber cafe or shared(with family or friends)-PC’s are the future. Cyber cafe’s to socialize ;)

      • Misery

        Cyber cafes…. For penniless travelers in transit. Yep, sounds like a winner to me!

    • http://redtulup.com Dmitri Smirnov

      Many customers hate to be charged for web-access on the phone, because carrier charge more when they can afford, if customer looking for a coupon to save 1-2$ on groceries, carrier charged 4.99 for web access plan, in this case customer choose not to use web plan, or they will use “flat rate” provider like Metro PCS, or provider with free “data plan”.

    • http://link Mr.Carrot82

      When I encounter problems at the bench, I use my computer to learn from other watchmakers. ,

  • http://www.mediathink.com/blog @mthinker

    Perhaps the single best blog entry I’ve read this year! Seriously. Great relevant facts. Thanks for sharing. Usability is the single most important part of getting mobile web-thirsty users online. Thanks for this.

  • http://www.mediathink.com/blog @mthinker

    Perhaps the single best blog entry I’ve read this year! Seriously. Great relevant facts. Thanks for sharing. Usability is the single most important part of getting mobile web-thirsty users online. Thanks for this.

  • http://jsmag.com/latest Michael Kimsal

    I agree with the author’s main point, and it’s great he’s got some citations, but do we really need citations and explanations as to why the current (or, perhaps, most previous) generation of mobile internet sucks?

    I’ve had a cell phone for 11 years or so now, and I’ve ‘browsed’ the web on my various phones less than 20 times during those 11 years. Why so little usage? Because it’s slow, the experience is horrible, and it’s damn expensive.

    We need cheaper, faster, better, and we need all three.

    Apple’s iPhone obviously showed the first steps to be taken, and others are now (finally?!?) taking notice that perhaps people might want to browse the web with a real browser. MS’ mobile story has had a mobile IE for some time now, but I’ve not used it enough to know how accurate or smooth a representation of the web it gave. We now need mobile Flash, Silverlight and other stuff to more closely replicate ‘regular’ browsing on mobile devices.

    • Nicholas

      I’m going to say that the mobile web is distinctly different than that which you wish to replicate. Mobile web access is about exploration, entertainment and specific actions. As Vic notes, it’s about on-device experience. I rarely miss the Flash stuff that websites tend to offer aside from wanting the page to load visually. More importantly, I want the information that I am requesting.

      The iPhone is an excellent example of a tight experience couple with the ability to define web interactions through applications. As a fan of widgets, such apps tend to be in that same family. The web without a browser…

      • Melvin Tercan

        You’re absolutely right. Remember back in the days when websites were replicas of traditional media and not interactive at all. You have the same problem with mobile websites.

        It is simply not enough to copy your website one on one to a mobile version. I, for instance, do not like to have a desktop version of a website on my mobile because that means I have to scroll and navigate more.

        On my mobile, I want access to information with the least effort. Visual aspects do not matter. I would choose a Facebook app (with limited features, but better navigation) over the full Facebook website every day.

    • http://redtulup.com Dmitri Smirnov

      Its time to have wimax module built in to the cellphones, to have access on wimax network not mobile..even if its 3G..just check where you are use your phone browser? coffee shop, store, work..etc..
      around those areas wi-fi, wimax..etc…i think it will be much better if phone get connected to fast and reliable network automatically..
      Dmitri

    • http://styleguidance.com Andrew

      what we need is no contracts from major carriers. We were going to give a choice of iphone/droid for our http://styleguidance.com style event, but the fact that the winner would be stuck with a contract dissuaded us

  • http://jsmag.com/latest Michael Kimsal

    I agree with the author’s main point, and it’s great he’s got some citations, but do we really need citations and explanations as to why the current (or, perhaps, most previous) generation of mobile internet sucks?

    I’ve had a cell phone for 11 years or so now, and I’ve ‘browsed’ the web on my various phones less than 20 times during those 11 years. Why so little usage? Because it’s slow, the experience is horrible, and it’s damn expensive.

    We need cheaper, faster, better, and we need all three.

    Apple’s iPhone obviously showed the first steps to be taken, and others are now (finally?!?) taking notice that perhaps people might want to browse the web with a real browser. MS’ mobile story has had a mobile IE for some time now, but I’ve not used it enough to know how accurate or smooth a representation of the web it gave. We now need mobile Flash, Silverlight and other stuff to more closely replicate ‘regular’ browsing on mobile devices.

    • Nicholas

      I’m going to say that the mobile web is distinctly different than that which you wish to replicate. Mobile web access is about exploration, entertainment and specific actions. As Vic notes, it’s about on-device experience. I rarely miss the Flash stuff that websites tend to offer aside from wanting the page to load visually. More importantly, I want the information that I am requesting.

      The iPhone is an excellent example of a tight experience couple with the ability to define web interactions through applications. As a fan of widgets, such apps tend to be in that same family. The web without a browser…

      • Melvin Tercan

        You’re absolutely right. Remember back in the days when websites were replicas of traditional media and not interactive at all. You have the same problem with mobile websites.

        It is simply not enough to copy your website one on one to a mobile version. I, for instance, do not like to have a desktop version of a website on my mobile because that means I have to scroll and navigate more.

        On my mobile, I want access to information with the least effort. Visual aspects do not matter. I would choose a Facebook app (with limited features, but better navigation) over the full Facebook website every day.

    • http://redtulup.com Dmitri Smirnov

      Its time to have wimax module built in to the cellphones, to have access on wimax network not mobile..even if its 3G..just check where you are use your phone browser? coffee shop, store, work..etc..
      around those areas wi-fi, wimax..etc…i think it will be much better if phone get connected to fast and reliable network automatically..
      Dmitri

    • http://styleguidance.com Andrew

      what we need is no contracts from major carriers. We were going to give a choice of iphone/droid for our http://styleguidance.com style event, but the fact that the winner would be stuck with a contract dissuaded us

  • http://myblogchannel.com/?p=7808 Follow the Mobile User | My Blog Channel

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  • http://myblogchannel.com/?p=7808 Follow the Mobile User | My Blog Channel

    […] continues to climb at a break-neck pace, with over 4 billion mobile subscribers at last count.1 (In comparison, the PC industry is forecasted to see its sharpest unit decline in history.2) […]

  • http://www.adrianeden.com Adrian Eden

    I love Mobile life. The world will soon be exclusively Mobile. Are you taking part in this growth, or are you falling behind? Readjust your business model beforehand, rather than being a follower, lead the way! great post!!!

    • Lewis Buckley

      What an absurd comment. The world will never be exclusively mobile.

      • http://www.adrianeden.com Adrian Eden

        For some people in Countries like India, China, and Thailand, they only have access to the Internet via Mobile phones. Later this year there will be a new iPod Touch released with a larger screen than previous models. This product will spawn the creation of some of the most advanced Smart Phones the world has ever seen, potentially mobilizing a huge percentage of Internet users. After we are all dead, ie when our kids kids are our age, they will all have Mobile Technology that allows them to access to the Internet, manage finances, locate products/services. Life will be governed by Mobile technologies.

        I always wonder why the people on Techcrunch with the least productive things to say leave comments without a website to link too. Lewis Buckley sounds like a name that you made up on the spot. Go back to your 9 to 5 job and leave the pioneering to people like me and Michael Arrington, you fool.

      • http://niyue.com nybon

        “For some people in Countries like India, China, and Thailand, they only have access to the Internet via Mobile phones.”
        That’s not the truth, at least for China, because I live there. Most people access the Internet via PC rather than mobile phone in China. Very rare people use mobile phone to access Internet, if there are some, usually, they can access Internet via PC in the same time.

      • Abhishek Roy

        “For some people in Countries like India, China, and Thailand, they only have access to the Internet via Mobile phones.”
        Not at all true. Most of the people now are shifting from dial-up to broadband on desktops. But mobile carriers are far behind in allowing internet connectivity – rates are high and the service is offered in few regions only. Most of the people do not have a blackberry, iphone or android also doesn’t help.
        Though the government is trying to offer farmers access to crop prices, weather and all through internet via cellphone, so this condition could change very soon.

      • Mobile

        “The world will never be exclusively mobile.”

        True. Only 95% mobile.

      • Nicholas

        I will be that the web becomes heavily skewed towards mobile. Remember, once many of the sites move to mobile focused incarnations, the more this feeds the change. Many sites, such as those for restaurants, should never be full sites anyway. Rarely are they supported regularly, and often don’t provide the most basic information concisely.

      • brent

        i agree, it may never be exclusively mobile. but mobile lifestyle is on it’s way to dominate the world, and if you prefer to deny it then it’s your loss.

      • http://www.google.com/ Emmy

        Now I feel stupid. That’s claeerd it up for me

      • http://htbkktwfldws.com/ uzstawjf

        Tk5j2M zhcekgboukpl

      • Lewis Buckley

        Adrian.
        I earn enough money from my ‘9 to 5’ job I don’t need to link spam.

        Your an idiot. You make no sense. And your website sucks.

  • http://www.adrianeden.com Adrian Eden

    I love Mobile life. The world will soon be exclusively Mobile. Are you taking part in this growth, or are you falling behind? Readjust your business model beforehand, rather than being a follower, lead the way! great post!!!

    • Lewis Buckley

      What an absurd comment. The world will never be exclusively mobile.

      • http://www.adrianeden.com Adrian Eden

        For some people in Countries like India, China, and Thailand, they only have access to the Internet via Mobile phones. Later this year there will be a new iPod Touch released with a larger screen than previous models. This product will spawn the creation of some of the most advanced Smart Phones the world has ever seen, potentially mobilizing a huge percentage of Internet users. After we are all dead, ie when our kids kids are our age, they will all have Mobile Technology that allows them to access to the Internet, manage finances, locate products/services. Life will be governed by Mobile technologies.

        I always wonder why the people on Techcrunch with the least productive things to say leave comments without a website to link too. Lewis Buckley sounds like a name that you made up on the spot. Go back to your 9 to 5 job and leave the pioneering to people like me and Michael Arrington, you fool.

      • http://niyue.com nybon

        “For some people in Countries like India, China, and Thailand, they only have access to the Internet via Mobile phones.”
        That’s not the truth, at least for China, because I live there. Most people access the Internet via PC rather than mobile phone in China. Very rare people use mobile phone to access Internet, if there are some, usually, they can access Internet via PC in the same time.

      • Abhishek Roy

        “For some people in Countries like India, China, and Thailand, they only have access to the Internet via Mobile phones.”
        Not at all true. Most of the people now are shifting from dial-up to broadband on desktops. But mobile carriers are far behind in allowing internet connectivity – rates are high and the service is offered in few regions only. Most of the people do not have a blackberry, iphone or android also doesn’t help.
        Though the government is trying to offer farmers access to crop prices, weather and all through internet via cellphone, so this condition could change very soon.

      • Mobile

        “The world will never be exclusively mobile.”

        True. Only 95% mobile.

      • Nicholas

        I will be that the web becomes heavily skewed towards mobile. Remember, once many of the sites move to mobile focused incarnations, the more this feeds the change. Many sites, such as those for restaurants, should never be full sites anyway. Rarely are they supported regularly, and often don’t provide the most basic information concisely.

      • brent

        i agree, it may never be exclusively mobile. but mobile lifestyle is on it’s way to dominate the world, and if you prefer to deny it then it’s your loss.

      • http://www.google.com/ Emmy

        Now I feel stupid. That’s claeerd it up for me

      • http://htbkktwfldws.com/ uzstawjf

        Tk5j2M zhcekgboukpl

      • Lewis Buckley

        Adrian.
        I earn enough money from my ‘9 to 5’ job I don’t need to link spam.

        Your an idiot. You make no sense. And your website sucks.

  • http://www.thefaredge.com/?p=1622 The Far Edge » Blog Archive » Follow the Mobile User

    […] continues to climb at a break-neck pace, with over 4 billion mobile subscribers at last count.1 (In comparison, the PC industry is forecasted to see its sharpest unit decline in history.2) […]

  • http://www.thefaredge.com/?p=1622 The Far Edge » Blog Archive » Follow the Mobile User

    […] continues to climb at a break-neck pace, with over 4 billion mobile subscribers at last count.1 (In comparison, the PC industry is forecasted to see its sharpest unit decline in history.2) […]

  • http://lonewolflibrarian.wordpress.com/2009/03/29/googles-2009-philosophy-for-consideration-focus-on-the-mobile-user-and-all-else-will-follow032909/ Google’s 2009 Philosophy for Consideration: “Focus on the mobile user, and all else will follow”…03.29.09 « The Proverbial Lone Wolf Librarian’s Weblog

    […] Gundotra, Vice President of Engineering for Google’s mobile and developer products, in “Focus on the mobile user, and all else will follow ” are excerpted below.  The entire posting is important to review and consider-not only for […]

  • http://lonewolflibrarian.wordpress.com/2009/03/29/googles-2009-philosophy-for-consideration-focus-on-the-mobile-user-and-all-else-will-follow032909/ Google’s 2009 Philosophy for Consideration: “Focus on the mobile user, and all else will follow”…03.29.09 « The Proverbial Lone Wolf Librarian’s Weblog

    […] Gundotra, Vice President of Engineering for Google’s mobile and developer products, in “Focus on the mobile user, and all else will follow ” are excerpted below.  The entire posting is important to review and consider-not only for […]

  • http://www.ajaxgirl.com/2009/03/29/follow-the-mobile-user/ Ajax Girl » Blog Archive » Follow the Mobile User

    […] continues to climb at a break-neck pace, with over 4 billion mobile subscribers at last count.1 (In comparison, the PC industry is forecasted to see its sharpest unit decline in history.2) […]

  • http://www.ajaxgirl.com/2009/03/29/follow-the-mobile-user/ Ajax Girl » Blog Archive » Follow the Mobile User

    […] continues to climb at a break-neck pace, with over 4 billion mobile subscribers at last count.1 (In comparison, the PC industry is forecasted to see its sharpest unit decline in history.2) […]

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  • Josh

    A totally self-serving post by a Google executive, which quotes the word “Google” far too much. Obviously users all want free access to the internet. The phone companies will figure this out soon.

    By the way, we as users actually don’t want to “go to Google” at all. We just want to run applications that make our lives easier. If Google really thinks Google is a destination in itself, the company is ready for a fall. I wish Techcrunch wouldnt publish posts like this.

    • Hassan

      Did you even read the complete post? I’m sure you missed the disclaimer…

    • Dave

      If you’re reading TechCrunch, you’re not a typical user. There are vast numbers of people in the world for whom “Internet Explorer”=”Google”=”the web”=”the internet”. It’s perfectly plausible to believe that what these people say they want is to “go to Google,” and this is how I read Vic’s statement. You may believe these people are idiots, and some of them certainly are, but the whole point of this post is how mobile internet is becoming available to them, so you can’t pretend they don’t exist.

      And yes, this post doesn’t tell us anything we didn’t already know, but it’s perfectly fine for execs in the industry to do research and write blog posts quoting the numbers they find. Confirming the obvious through data is good. (Though you can take issue with some of the specific metrics, as other commenters have.)

  • Josh

    A totally self-serving post by a Google executive, which quotes the word “Google” far too much. Obviously users all want free access to the internet. The phone companies will figure this out soon.

    By the way, we as users actually don’t want to “go to Google” at all. We just want to run applications that make our lives easier. If Google really thinks Google is a destination in itself, the company is ready for a fall. I wish Techcrunch wouldnt publish posts like this.

    • Hassan

      Did you even read the complete post? I’m sure you missed the disclaimer…

    • Dave

      If you’re reading TechCrunch, you’re not a typical user. There are vast numbers of people in the world for whom “Internet Explorer”=”Google”=”the web”=”the internet”. It’s perfectly plausible to believe that what these people say they want is to “go to Google,” and this is how I read Vic’s statement. You may believe these people are idiots, and some of them certainly are, but the whole point of this post is how mobile internet is becoming available to them, so you can’t pretend they don’t exist.

      And yes, this post doesn’t tell us anything we didn’t already know, but it’s perfectly fine for execs in the industry to do research and write blog posts quoting the numbers they find. Confirming the obvious through data is good. (Though you can take issue with some of the specific metrics, as other commenters have.)

  • http://adwarrior.wordpress.com/2009/03/30/terrible-news-for-the-pc-industry-mobile-phones-and-data-plans-have-found-their-mojo/ Terrible news for the PC industry: Mobile phones and data plans have found their mojo. « Ad Warrior

    […] Click here to see the full post on techcrunchit.com.  […]

  • http://adwarrior.wordpress.com/2009/03/30/terrible-news-for-the-pc-industry-mobile-phones-and-data-plans-have-found-their-mojo/ Terrible news for the PC industry: Mobile phones and data plans have found their mojo. « Ad Warrior

    […] Click here to see the full post on techcrunchit.com.  […]

  • http://www.mobspot.com Einar

    Interesting read. Thanks, Vic. I think the first example with MetroPCS isn’t all that important..a good example of the US mobile industry compared to the RoW. RoW data adoption is far ahead of US adoption, so I don’t think the data itself is all that relevant (everyone knows US data adoption lags). However, your general point of consumers wanting easy, seamless internet access on their cell phones makes sense. Glad to see you reference Opera’s State of the Mobile Web report. (Disclaimer – I used to work for Opera)

  • http://www.mobspot.com Einar

    Interesting read. Thanks, Vic. I think the first example with MetroPCS isn’t all that important..a good example of the US mobile industry compared to the RoW. RoW data adoption is far ahead of US adoption, so I don’t think the data itself is all that relevant (everyone knows US data adoption lags). However, your general point of consumers wanting easy, seamless internet access on their cell phones makes sense. Glad to see you reference Opera’s State of the Mobile Web report. (Disclaimer – I used to work for Opera)

  • http://onhit.net/follow-the-mobile-user/ Follow the Mobile User

    […] continues to climb at a break-neck pace, with over 4 billion mobile subscribers at last count.1 (In comparison, the PC industry is forecasted to see its sharpest unit decline in history.2) […]

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