Steve Gillmor

Steve Gillmor is a technology commentator, editor, and producer in the enterprise technology space. He is Head of Technical Media Strategy at salesforce.com and a TechCrunch contributing editor.

Gillmor previously worked with leading musical artists including Paul Butterfield, David Sanborn, and members of The Band after an early career as a record producer and filmmaker with Columbia Records’ Firesign Theatre. As personal computers emerged in video and music production tools, Gillmor started contributing to various publications, most notably Byte Magazine, where he was a lead reviewer of development and collaborative platform systems including Visual Basic, Lotus Notes, Microsoft Office, and Windows NT. Subsequently, Gillmor served as a contributing editor at InformationWeek Labs, before joining Fawcette Technical Publications first as Senior Editor and later as Editor in Chief of Enterprise Development Magazine, and then Editor in Chief and Editorial Director of XML and Java Pro Magazines.

Gillmor joined InfoWorld Magazine as Test Center Director and back-page columnist. He also served as Editor of eWEEK.com’s Messaging & Collaboration Center and OpEd columnist of eWeek’s print publication. As blogging emerged, he wrote the first blogs for Ziff Davis Media, CMP’s CRN, and CNet’s ZDNet, where he remains a contributing editor. A podcasting pioneer, he developed and hosted the seminal Gillmor Gang podcast with industry notables including Jon Udell, [Dan Farber](http://www.crunchbase.com/person/Dan-Farber), [Mike Arrington](http://www.crunchbase.com/person/michael-arrington), [Jason Calacanis](http://www.crunchbase.com/person/Jason-Calacanis), [Michael Vizard](http://www.crunchbase.com/person/michael-vizard), [Doc Searls](http://www.crunchbase.com/person/doc-searls) and others as regulars. Gillmor has also championed development of industry standards, most notably his role as co-creator of the attention.xml specification and co-founder of the Attention Trust, a non-profit organization to protect user data rights.

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Latest from Steve Gillmor

  • Say Cheese

    It’s been quite a while (May) since I wrote a post about the then-less-obvious move away from RSS toward micromessaging. The observation that Twitter’s rapid growth was supplanting the use of RSS as a reading mechanism — in my case abandoning Google Reader in favor of FriendFeed — was met with emotional attacks from RSS’s prime mover, Dave Winer. Knowing from… Read More

  • One and one and one is three

    Today’s Gmail outage illustrates just how tolerant the new realtime architecture is to individual service failure. The initial surprise at the comprehensive nature of the flatlining may have caused some significant degree of marketing damage, my bet is that the end result will be a boost to the service’s popularity, and with it, realtime services including Twitter and… Read More

  • Teddy's smile

    Watching Teddy Kennedy’s wake and funeral over the past few days has been a sad but wonderful lesson in the value of public service. By public service I mean the motive variously referred to as empathy, generosity, fairness, and other such terms demonized as liberalism by the new and to some extent old right wing. The Senator’s life consumed not only those labels but the full arc of… Read More

  • The Real Truth about Apple and Google and Arrington

    Watching our fearless leader’s journey into AndroidWorld has been fantastically entertaining, as Mike’s mission to bring Google Voice to the iPhone is presented as a move to the free open Google voice device hoedown. Entertaining mostly because if the real truth were revealed, we would understand how Machiavellian this “revolution” really is, and how Arrington, Google… Read More

  • The Short and Winding Road

    The news that some loser URL shortener is closing down does not prove anything other than that those who promoted it with their links better have gotten something out of the deal already. It’s all part of the usual pony ride that starts with excitement about the possibilities and ends in recriminations about the winners controlling the market. Now Dave Winer is calling for an end to what… Read More

  • Blame FriendFeed II

    With Twitter down this morning and reports of failure all over the social Web, I figured FriendFeed would be up, if denuded by the Twitter outage. Well, sorta. In fact, FriendFeed searches are down. How the hell does a denial of service attack plague reach into the coolest service no-one will ever use, as former user Mike Arrington once put it. Is the realtime Web screeching to a halt on… Read More

  • The Silverlight App Store

    OK. Did Microsoft just absorb Yahoo for zero additional cost beyond its oft-stated plans to spend some 10-15% of its budget on search per year? Did Apple really stifle innovation with its carrier-friendly App Store rules? And what’s common to both companies’ developer strategies? Yes, no, a lot. Working backwards, Apple and Microsoft offer their developer communities their… Read More

  • Hey You Get Off of My Cloud

    Sandwiched neatly between the RealTime is God and RealTime Who Needs It crowds is a new group that embraces both positions while moving forward rapidly. These folks include Brett Slatkin of the PubSubHubub effort and Dave Winer of rssCloud.org. Slatkin and fellow conspirator Brad Fitzpatrick demoed the PSHBB architecture at the RealTime Stream Crunchup, and Winer quickly jumped in with his… Read More

  • RSS is the new BetaMax, says Apple sales numbers

    The data from the Apple earnings call illustrates the difficult time RSS will have staving off micromessaging. Most telling was the turf the iPhone took out of iPod sales. Every one of those iPhone sales, no matter whether they are the new 3GS or the $100 3G model, reduce the reasons for syncing to a Windows or Mac box in order to bring down podcasts. As realtime accelerates, streaming text… Read More

  • Silverlight Office

    I know Robert Scoble thinks Office is still not dead, but his excitement about the Office 2010 tech preview should be taken with a large grain of salt. Of course, it was fun to be treated to an old-media style press barnstorm of the flogosphere, and the bells and whistles — poof, don’t need Photoshop, nor iMovie neither, and how about those browser features, cool — certainly… Read More

  • Break Up GoogleSoft

    The best news in years for Microsoft just hit the wires. Remember way back when Microsoft was under the threat of a breakup in the anti-trust days? Bill Gates famously pointed out Microsoft had no such thing as a monopoly, because (this was pre-Google) some company could come along at any moment and change the dynamics of the environment. Soon he was proven exactly correct, as Google emerged… Read More

  • Track is Back The Movie

    I’ve been filming segments with various folks in preparation for TechCrunch’s Realtime Stream CrunchUp this coming Friday. One of these conversations took place last Thursday in the wake of FriendFeed’s announcement of what they call Realtime Search and what I call the return of Track. Paul Buchheit and his co-founder Bret Taylor have been on numerous editions of the Gillmor… Read More

  • Things we said today

    Today I got a call from my sister about our other sister. When the phone rings from one family member to another, and it’s not birthday season, it’s always bad news. Our other sister, because that’s how we always called her, was dead. She was the adopted daughter of our father’s third marriage, and she was a very unhappy, angry person who the rest of us had a hard… Read More

  • Why 140 characters is plenty

    A few posts ago Dave Winer continues his criticism of Twitter’s 140 character limit. Never mind that Dave aggressively supported cloning Twitter’s APIs and character limit in the Bearhug days when Twitter needed the support. Never mind that things have changed now and apparently Twitter is too big for our own good. Dave’s back and forth is part of a grand old tradition, where… Read More

  • The Realtime News Network

    How long will it take for the market to capitulate to the rise of Twitter? You’d think with Oprah and Iran and whatever the next micro-event will become, the so-called pundits of old and new media would stop beating the dead horse of Twitter vulnerability. Certainly they’ve mostly slowed down, overwhelmed by the daily startups, the late night jokes, and the mainstream Macarena over… Read More

  • The Delta Flow

    I’m trying to remember what it was like before software went away. Seems like a long time ago, and yet very immediate. It’s like the Steinberg New Yorker cover: the West Side Drive, the Hudson, New Jersey, the Rockies, Big Sur. One day we thought in the context of applications, the next in downloads, and now in updates. There is no single application, just iterative features flowing… Read More

  • Hanging on for dear life

    With the Gillmor Gang shut down, I’ve been shifting my attention to the Realtime Stream CrunchUp Eric Schonfeld and I are hosting July 10 at the Fox Theater in Redwood City. Growing interest from startups, bigcos, open standards developers, and investors augurs for a valuable event. I hope you’ll join us. Some of the areas we expect to see explored include, obviously, Twitter… Read More

  • Why Apple wins. every. time.

    Today there was no reality distortion field. Just a reality field. You want video. Here it is. You want devs to have video. Here it is. You want to edit video in place without loading Quicktime Pro or even knowing what it is. Here it is. You want the video menu and nav tools to disapper. They’re gone. You want them back. Here they are. You want a way to find your iPhone if you put it… Read More

  • Ozzie at the Bat

    Microsoft Chief Software Architect Ray Ozzie faced down two hardball questions in a Q & A wrap to a conversation with Wired editor Steven Levy at the Churchill Club. On one, a much anticipated question about Google’s new realtime collaboration tool Wave, Ozzie had put a lot of thought into the answer. He praised the small startup project as only he could, as a clone of the Groove… Read More

  • The Third Front

    Scott McNealy’s reappearance at JavaOne for the first time in the years since he handed control to Jonathan Schwartz had the feeling of a swan song. But there was also a steely purpose to his gate and demeanor, as he dismissed Schwartz with a hearty handclasp for his stewardship and extracted the slide clicker from his grasp with a note of baton-passing. The camera didn’t even… Read More