security

  • Another European e2e encrypted Gmail alternative reports rising signups

    Another European e2e encrypted Gmail alternative reports rising signups

    Tutanota, an end-to-end encrypted email service located in Germany, says it’s seeing an “exponential” uptick in sign-ups — crediting this to growing awareness of and concern for privacy online for a variety of (often political) reasons. Read More

  • Making sense of the laptop ban

    Making sense of the laptop ban

    News broke earlier this week that the U.S. would ban laptops and tablets (and any other electronic device larger than a smartphone) from all U.S.-bound flights that take off from 10 airports in the Middle East and Northern Africa. The U.K. then followed suit and instituted its own ban, which targets a slightly different list of airports, which — at least on the face of it —… Read More

  • Google is the latest company to brush off most of the WikiLeaks vulnerabilities

    Google is the latest company to brush off most of the WikiLeaks vulnerabilities

    WikiLeaks dumped thousands of alleged CIA documents online yesterday that contained lists of vulnerabilities in popular tech products, sending companies scrambling to make sure their security patches were up-to-date. But as companies reviewed the documents, it became clear that most of the vulnerabilities they contained were outdated. Apple first dismissed the majority of the listed iPhone… Read More

  • Okta acquihires Stormpath, doubles down on identity in apps and APIs

    Okta acquihires Stormpath, doubles down on identity in apps and APIs

    Okta, the $1.2 billion identity management startup for enterprises that some tip for an IPO this year, has made an acquisition of sorts to expand one of its newer lines of business: managing IDs across APIs and apps. Today the San Francisco-based company announced that it has picked up the team from Stormpath, an early mover in providing a way for developers to implement authentication… Read More

  • Researcher finds bug that allowed free Uber rides

    Researcher finds bug that allowed free Uber rides

    Uber has patched a bug in its code that allowed a researcher — and anyone else who might’ve discovered the problem — to hail Uber rides without paying for them. Anand Prakash, a security researcher, discovered the bug in August and received permission from Uber to test it in the U.S. and India. He was able to successfully exploit the bug, getting free rides in… Read More

  • Here’s what the head of Uber’s self-driving program wasn’t asked on stage today

    Here’s what the head of Uber’s self-driving program wasn’t asked on stage today

    Uber-owned Otto’s co-founder Anthony Levandowski must be mightily relieved after an onstage Q&A here at the Mobile World Congress tradeshow passed by with zero awkward moments. For example, there was no mention of the fact his former employer is suing his current employer over allegations of IP theft… Read More

  • Superintelligent AI explains Softbank’s push to raise a $100BN Vision Fund

    Superintelligent AI explains Softbank’s push to raise a $100BN Vision Fund

    Anyone who’s seen Softbank CEO Masayoshi Son give a keynote speech will know he rarely sticks to the standard industry conference playbook. And his turn on the stage at Mobile World Congress this morning was no different, with Son making like Eldon Tyrell and telling delegates about his personal belief in a looming computing Singularity… Read More

  • Trump and the EU-US privacy shield laws Crunch Network

    Trump and the EU-US privacy shield laws

    On January 25, the Trump administration injected a whole new level of uncertainty into the already-fragile EU-US data flow agreement, known as the Privacy Shield. With the stroke of a pen, President Trump signed an executive order entitled “Enhancing Public Safety in the Interior of the United States,” which directed agencies to “exclude persons who are not United States… Read More

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