Poetry

  • Read The Sonnet Co-Authored By Shakespeare, An MIT PhD Student & A Machine-Learning Algorithm

    Read The Sonnet Co-Authored By Shakespeare, An MIT PhD Student & A Machine-Learning Algorithm

    Machine-learning as a technology is, without doubt, the force that will be shaping our digital world for years and years to come, making it smarter and more autonomous, and sometimes taking our breath away in the process with its apparent agency. Read More

  • Upstagram Is A Flying Raspberry Pi That Publishes Live Pictures On Instagram

    Upstagram Is A Flying Raspberry Pi That Publishes Live Pictures On Instagram

    What do Instagram, the Raspberry Pi and the movie “Up” have in common? When you mash all these things together, you get Upstagram, a neat hack that the Hackerloop team just unveiled. First, the team made a replica of the house in “Up” using paper and foam. It was just big enough to fit a Raspberry Pi and its camera, a battery and a 3G hotspot. The Raspberry Pi, an… Read More

  • Pentametron Is A Twitter Poet That Gives Bots Some Literary Cred

    Pentametron Is A Twitter Poet That Gives Bots Some Literary Cred

    If you’re reading this post, chances are that you use Twitter as a place to chat about, link to, search, debate and debunk the big and little things going on in tech. But as you know (and as Twitter likes to remind us again and again and again) Twitter is also home to a lot of other kinds of conversations. And bots. And spam (boo). And some creative types, too. Read More

  • Now On The iPhone: Opuss, An Instagram For Words

    Now On The iPhone: Opuss, An Instagram For Words

    Attention, hipsters: you can now take your poetry slams mobile. (Do hipsters still like poetry slams? I don’t know). Anyway, there’s a new iPhone app called Opuss, which describes itself as an “Instagram for words.” But to be clear, it doesn’t have to be just for poetry. It can also be used to save and share beloved quotes, jokes, recipes, reviews, stories or… Read More

  • Death Looms Near

    quotes Thomas’ famous villanelle “Do Not Go Gentle Into that Good Night.” The end of the intro has a blurry image and it’s rather difficult to make out what it is. Anyone care to speculate? (Thanks Stephen!) Read More