Opinion

  • Adding encryption to cameras won’t solve photojournalists’ problems

    Adding encryption to cameras won’t solve photojournalists’ problems

    When the Freedom of the Press Foundation published an open letter to Canon, encouraging the company to implement encryption features into its cameras, it missed the point. Yes, encryption per se is a great idea, but when dodging bullets in war zones, gravity friction-lock batons in tin-pot dictatorships or nasty cutlery if you’re filming gangs, it isn’t going to help you. Read More

  • Google added fact checking: Facebook, it’s your move now

    Google added fact checking: Facebook, it’s your move now

    Google yesterday announced it will introduce a fact check tag on Google News in order to display articles that contain factual information next to trending news items. Now it’s time for Facebook to take fact-checking more seriously, too. Facebook has stepped into the role of being today’s newspaper: that is, it’s a single destination where a large selection of news… Read More

  • The dream of the Courier lives on, but it’s still a dream

    The dream of the Courier lives on, but it’s still a dream

    Oh yes, young feller, that there Yoga Book sure is something. But why don’t you just set a while an’ listen to the stories of an old blogger. ‘Twas back in the old days — before the millennials took over. That’d be 2009 or so. Longer than most remember these days. Let me ask ya something, m’boy. Ever hear tell of a Courier? Read More

  • Buying @Haje: How I got my given name as my Twitter handle for $250

    Buying @Haje: How I got my given name as my Twitter handle for $250

    You’ll never guess how I got my given name as my Twitter handle. It involved a six-month campaign that included some light Internet stalking, badgering staff at Twitter, $250 and a visit to the patent office. In addition to being an early adopter, I’m an idiot. I failed to realize how big Twitter was going to become in the next decade, and, more importantly, what people would be… Read More

  • App Release Notes Are Getting Stupid

    App Release Notes Are Getting Stupid

    “Bug fixes.” “Jam packed full of Super Amazing Things.” “Every 3 weeks, we polish up the Pinterest app to make it faster and better than ever.” “To make our app better for you, we bring updates to the App Store every 2 weeks…Every update of our Facebook app includes improvements for speed and reliability. As other new features become… Read More

  • Every Fitness App And Wearable Should Have A Mood Tracker

    Every Fitness App And Wearable Should Have A Mood Tracker

    Along with its many other benefits, regular workouts contribute to better mood and energy levels. As a result, I am constantly surprised to see how many fitness tracking apps and wearable devices lack a mood tracking feature. Read More

  • Opinion-Sharing Platform Knotch Launches A New Website And Updated App

    Opinion-Sharing Platform Knotch Launches A New Website And Updated App

    Since downloading it six months ago, Knotch, which lets people share their opinions on a wide range of topics using an 11-color “feeling thermometer,” has become one of my favorite apps because of its strong community. The startup launched a redesigned version of its iOS app today, along with a new website called Knotch.It. Read More

  • Was Promised Flying Cars, But Would Settle For Something Practical

    Was Promised Flying Cars, But Would Settle For Something Practical

    After your laundry has been pressed and folded for you. After you’ve been driven to and fro in black cars, and flown in black jets. After you shopped online for weekends on end. Read More

  • Aaron Swartz's Legacy Increases Awareness of Penalties For Digital Crimes

    Keen On… Injustice: What The Aaron Swartz Case Says About The American Criminal Justice System

    The Aaron Swartz tragedy has unleashed an intense debate about computer “crime” and the US criminal justice system. Heavyweights like Lessig, Doctorow, Greenwald, Masnick, Wu and Kerr have all written with great passion about the case. But the one article that really resonated with me was written by the Harvard Business Review blogger James Allworth. Read More

  • Keen On...Could WCIT Really Mean the End of the Internet?

    Keen On… WCIT: Is This The End Of The Internet? [TCTV]

    Today, the dark day Syria shut down its Internet, web freedom should be at the very forefront of all of our minds. Web freedom was also center stage earlier this week when Stanford Law School hosted an event called “Sticky WCIT: Is This The End Of The Internet.” I asked several of the experts attending the event whether a WCIT meeting next week in Dubai might be a big threat to… Read More

  • Simplify, simplify: How Microsoft can release just one version of Windows 7


    With everyone’s fears about multiple versions of Windows 7 confirmed today, the question on everybody’s lips is “why?” After all, they say themselves that they’re focusing on just the two main versions (Home Premium and Professional), and they must know, if not admit, that the various tiers of Vista hurt it badly. So why release these different versions? Well… Read More

  • Which ultraportable should I buy?


    I’ve been contemplating for some time on whether or not I want to purchase a smaller laptop to travel with or tote around the city. My 15-inch MBP is a great workstation, but it’s heavy and gets crushed on the plane by the jackass sitting in front of me who decides to recline the second he/she gets in the seat. I like the old 12-inch PowerBook G4s and thought about picking up a… Read More

  • One Editor's Opinion: Your iPhone "App" Sucks

    This morning, we happened to find a particular “web application” that was already being touted as an “iPhone application”. It’s called OneTrip and guess what? It’s supposed to be an amazing shopping list app. designed specifically for the iPhone! According to OneTrip’s help page: Read More

  • Dude Knows Better Than Apple, Offers Way To Perfect The iPod

    All credit to Wired‘s Leander Kahney, for he and he alone knows how to fix the iPod. You know, the iPod that rejuvenated Apple, helping transform it from Apple Computer to Apple, Inc. It seems Kahney thinks that there’s something& mdash; some things — wrong with Apple’s portable media player. They “bug” him. Watch out, world, Kahney’s on a tear. Read More

  • When will Politics 2.0 happen?

    Given that one of the questions posed by Loic Le Meur at Le Web3 was how will the web change the political system, I thought this link from Stuart Bruce’s was apt. Simon Dickson who writes the brilliant theyworkforyou.com has created a new mash-up of UK MPs using Google Maps.  From time to time I like to keep an eye on what my local MP Theresa May is doing, how she is voting on… Read More

  • Threshers voucher goes down storm online

    Heather Hopkins over at Hitwise has a great analysis of the recent Stormhoek online voucher promotion with Thresher Wine. Hugh McLeod also has some great posts on why the voucher virus took hold and spread. Will others try and replicate this; of course they will but will they be as successful, I doubt it.  It was odd being on a pub crawl with Hugh getting frequent updates as the news spread. Read More

  • Wesabe – clues for Money 2.0?

    OK, OK, no more 2.0 ‘clichesuffixes’ :) I’ve been eagerly awaiting the launch of Wesabe (not to be confused with the nuclear horseradish) for several weeks. Firstly, it’s an interesting concept and secondly, one of the co-founders is Marc Hedlund – O’Reilly Media’s entrepreneur-in-residence and author of hugely entertaining and informative talks on… Read More

  • Neo-Network Computing & The Service-Oriented Client

    Google’s Eric Schmidt made the perfect analogy for webware and web-based applications yesterday at O’Reilly’s Web 2.0 conference: “Fundamentally, it’s better to keep your money in the bank than in your pocket.” Schmidt was commenting on the notion that architectural recent developments had now enabled the vision of Ellison’s Network Computer to finally… Read More