medical

  • Get your own DNA portrait for $169

    If you’ve been trying to find the ultimate in personalization, look no further – how does an 8×10 portrait of your DNA sound? For $169, you can send a swab of the inside of your mouth to dna11.com and 4-6 weeks later, you’ll get a visual image of your one-of-a-kind DNA sequence. You can customize the image in one of 25 colors, too, and it comes with a certificate of… Read More

  • Meet Keiko, the newest (talking) robot for medical students

    Gifu University’s Graduate School of Medicine [JP] (located in central Japan) has developed a new “sick” robot, which is specifically geared towards medical students. Named Keiko (“practice” in Japanese), the robot is able to answer questions such as “How are you doing?”, i.e. by saying “I get tired easily lately”. The interactive… Read More

  • Yikes: cell phones causing cancer again

    Well, this latest news is less than thrilling, since I started using a cell phone at about 15 (it was a brick). Swedish researchers have found that children who started using cell phones before the age of 20 were five times more likely to develop cancer. The quote, please: “People who started mobile phone use before the age of 2 had more than five-fold increase in glioma”, a cancer… Read More

  • NEC launches Atom-powered touchscreen PCs

    Little Atom-equipped touchscreen PCs are dropping from more and more companies with NEC being the latest. These two models come in either 12- or 15-inch sizes and are obviously powered by Intel’s Atom processor clocking in at 1.6GHz. The units can be configured with either 512MB or 1GB of ram and comes with a sizable 80GB hard drive. Users have to deal with Vista Business Embedded via… Read More

  • New MRI technique works at near-cellular-level resolution


    Oh, those crazy biologists! Their MRI techniques are unstoppable. The MRI is often cited in popular media as being this magical cure-all or way to see “the exact location of love” or some such nonsense, when it is actually a limited tool with very specific applications and limitations — for example, interference from water and tissue makes it a slightly imprecise affair. Read More

  • Hospital software allows docs to view complex medical data anywhere


    Say you get in a car accident and they need to do an MRI to determine if there’s damage to this or that in your brain. That MRI generates a ton of data, and until recently the only way you could view that data was on a specialized workstation meant just for that purpose. FiatLux, a Microsoft offshoot with modest funding, has created a way to take advantage of the extremely powerful GPUs… Read More

  • Microbot sticks gently in your gut, snaps pictures


    A Nanorobotics professor at Carnegie Mellon has created a little pill-sized robot that he says can travel safely through the gut and snap good pictures along the way. The problem in the past has been that the adhesive required to stick a camera to an intestinal wall (or whatever) has been permanent. Meaning you’d have to rip out a piece if you wanted to remove the camera. So if you… Read More

  • Smart trousers detect wobbly walks, imminent falls in elderly

    If we can’t build a pair of pants yet that can prevent someone from falling, I guess the best we can do is make a pair that lets you know when you’re about to fall. These “E-Textile” pants are shot through with accelerometers, gyroscopes, bend sensors, all with a common 9V battery as a power source. They exchange information with a nearby hub, which can alert someone… Read More

  • IV drip stations in Japan are good for what ails ya

    After a night of “hard living” back in my days as a bachelor in the exciting city of Minneapolis (circa 2002), my buddy and I were picking up our cars from the parking lot of the bar we’d been drinking at the night before. The bar was inside a quasi-mall-type-thing (Calhoun Square, for those of you familiar with Minneapolis) and we’d caught wind of a new oxygen kiosk… Read More

  • Super strong artificial silk almost here

    Apparently there’s something about spider silk that makes it really strong and really hard to replicate. Scientists have gotten closer to being able to make silk-like material that’s “five times stronger than steel,” according to the BBC. In the past, it’s been too difficult to produce artificial silk in large enough quantities to make it worthwhile, but scientist… Read More

  • U.S. bionic eye recently tested successfully in Europe

    I bet we’ll start to see more and more of these types of stories in the next two to three years. Apparently two British men have received successful eye operations that have restored their sight. I saw another story on a 60 Minutes-type show (might have actually been 60 Minutes) about a guy in Colorado (maybe it was California) that got a similar operation and then wondered if he was… Read More

  • Hackers could hack your defibrillator and make you and your family die

    [photopress:defib.jpg,full,center] Hackers, those pesky critters that little the Interwebs with malicious code that steals your credit card numbers and casserole recipies, have now turned their attention towards something a little scary: defibrillators. OK, not really, but it’s possible. Many Americans are outfitted with devices that send wireless data to their doctors, reducing the… Read More

  • Reusable swallowable camera pills come cheap these days

    Researchers at the University of Washington (where I am kind of an alumnus, go Huskies) have devised an alternative to using a bulky endoscope to look inside a patient’s tracts. They’d use this pill-camera, about the size of a big almond, attached to a thin string, which a patient can easily swallow and regurgitate without too much discomfort. Plus, it only costs $300, which means… Read More

  • Laser developed to fight viruses

    Physics professor K.T. Tsen announced last week that he successfully destroyed common viruses using pluses from an infared laser without harming the surrounding cells. Tsen’s primary focus is to use the technique against HIV, though he states the future of the laser may very well be in treating disease, not viruses. So, how does it work? The laser produces a vibration that shatters… Read More

  • Australia's $4.4 million kinetic energy vest

    Sure, you could build your own similar device for far less than $4.4 million (Australian) but would it look nearly as awesome as the vest that the bad mamma jamma on the left is wearing? My position is “no, it would not.” The aforementioned money was given to Australia’s national science agency as a grant in the hopes that it could develop an “electrojacket”… Read More

  • Probo: 'The Intelligent, Autonomous Huggy Robot'

    Picture this. A child is in a hospital room, away from home and scared by his or her surroundings. Everything smells different, everything looks different, all the people are different. Where are mom and dad? When is it time to go home? Suddenly, in marches a robotic monster with green fur asking for hugs. Read More

  • Technology Marches Forth: Better Breasts on the Horizon

    Dear All the Strippers I’ve Paid Before: I’m sorry, but I’m not a boob guy. I’m thinking maybe i’m not into your boobs, that I’m a butt guy. Now I’m not saying it’s your fault, but it could be that some of your boobs look way fake. I’m a science nerd, and they look like Neptune and Uranis: almost the same size, globular, and far away from… Read More

  • Damnit, Jim. I'm a Doctor, Not a Tablet

    The biggest problem with the medical industry is that it is far behind on information technology. Patient records aren’t synchronized or shared with others, and it’s difficult to make sense and organize all the information that is coming in about a patient. One solution could be the Philips Mobile Clinical Assistant, or MCA. the MCA is sort of a cross between a tablet PC and PDA. Read More

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