leap motion

  • Authentication now comes with a wave of your hand

    Authentication now comes with a wave of your hand

    Under the nom de guerre of Redrock Biometrics, two former Leap Motion execs are waging war on the world’s legions of identification cards, pin numbers, passwords, and voice identification technologies with a combination of off-the-shelf hardware and proprietary software to identify palm-prints to verify user identity. Read More

  • Leap Motion nabs $50M for its VR/AR hand-tracking tech

    Leap Motion nabs $50M for its VR/AR hand-tracking tech

    Headset-based VR and AR may be a bit slower out of the gates than many had hoped, but investors are still pouring money into startups looking to change how consumers interact with the digital world. Leap Motion, a hand-tracking company based in San Francisco, has raised $50 million in Series C funding. The startup has raised nearly $95 million to date. Read More

  • Leap Motion demos its excellent hand tracking technology on Samsung’s Gear VR

    Leap Motion demos its excellent hand tracking technology on Samsung’s Gear VR

    When Leap Motion debuted in 2010, it felt like a technology in search of a platform. The startup demoed some truly impressive motion tracking technology as a means of interacting with two-dimensional computer interface. “We always thought of the PC as the first touch point on a journey that would be about five or six years,” explains cofounder, Michael Buckwald. The startup managed… Read More

  • Leap Motion shows off Interaction Engine for their VR hand-tracking tech

    Leap Motion shows off Interaction Engine for their VR hand-tracking tech

    VR makes the most sense when you don’t have to learn the controls and stuff just works. Today, Leap Motion dropped an early access beta version of their Interaction Engine which makes it easier for developers to build VR environments can adroitly manipulate with their hands. In a blog post, the company calls the engine “a layer that exists between the Unity game engine and… Read More

  • Will the Internet of Things make us superhuman? Crunch Network

    Will the Internet of Things make us superhuman?

    Technology is quickly redefining what it means to be human. There is no denying that we are considerably different from the people who came before us, not only in that we successfully wield technology to overcome a range of challenges, but we also utilize it to enhance our current condition. Transhumanism will very likely be the next stage of human development. Read More

  • Hands On: Leap Motion’s Minority Report-style Gesture Controller Gets Smarter, Faster, And More Accurate

    Back in 2012, Leap Motion seemingly came out of nowhere with a crazy hand-sensing gesture controller that looked like something straight out of Minority Report. Alas, the product landed with a bit of a thud. Buggy and inaccurate, the first build just wasn’t as good as most had hoped. Within two years, they’d sold just 500,000 units. The product has made a bunch of small steps… Read More

  • 3D Is The New 2D Crunch Network

    3D Is The New 2D

    User interfaces traditionally have been 2D for desktops and the web. Mobile phone apps, while supporting 3D for specific cases like games, also have been 2D. The Flat UI design movement, although incorporating subtle elements of 3D, has only reinforced that 2D is the main and most optimal interaction mechanism for existing computing devices. Conversely, full 3D has always occupied niches, such… Read More

  • Augmented And Virtual Reality 1.0 — 2016 Preview Crunch Network

    Augmented And Virtual Reality 1.0 — 2016 Preview

    Samsung/Oculus’ Gear VR launch was the starting gun for AR/VR 1.0, so what can we expect next year? Strap on your magic goggles, it’s immersion time. Read More

  • The Biggest Challenges Left In Virtual Reality, According To Oculus

    The Biggest Challenges Left In Virtual Reality, According To Oculus

    The second half of Facebook’s keynote took an odd turn today at F8, spending a surprising amount of time looking at the unknowns of consciousness and visual illusions. But toward the end, Oculus Chief Scientist Michael Abrash spent a few minutes talking about the biggest opportunities for improvement in the virtual-reality experience: haptics, visuals, audio and tracking. Read More