Column

  • Ads are bad, and also terrible Crunch Network

    Ads are bad, and also terrible

    Every so often, I find myself forced to use the Web on a browser without uBlock or an equivalent; and every time, I think to myself “How do people live like this?” The un-ad-blocked web is a miserable cesspool of autoplaying video and hysterical calls to action, slow to load, hard to look at. It’s even worse on your phone, where ads devour your battery life and up to 75% of… Read More

  • Is big data in big trouble? Crunch Network

    Is big data in big trouble?

    We recently saw two critical developments in the big data and analytics space. Tableau released earnings and missed their forecast by $0.05; their stock dropped 5 percent. Then Hortonworks announced a revenue miss that sent the stock into a downward spiral. What’s going on with the business intelligence and Hadoop space? Read More

  • Reimagining the ecosystem for identity verification Crunch Network

    Reimagining the ecosystem for identity verification

    What’s in a name? When it comes in the form of a password, everything. The password has long been the safeguard — and in many cases, the only one — to protect our online identity. At one point, passwords seemed like the most obvious way to verify account ownership. But, over time, and with the increasing complexity and diversity of internet usage, we can all agree on one… Read More

  • Will the Internet of Things make us superhuman? Crunch Network

    Will the Internet of Things make us superhuman?

    Technology is quickly redefining what it means to be human. There is no denying that we are considerably different from the people who came before us, not only in that we successfully wield technology to overcome a range of challenges, but we also utilize it to enhance our current condition. Transhumanism will very likely be the next stage of human development. Read More

  • What the Fitbit lawsuit means for clinical researchers Crunch Network

    What the Fitbit lawsuit means for clinical researchers

    Fitbit is facing a class-action lawsuit regarding the accuracy of their heart-rate data, which have been shown to be inaccurate by a margin of up to 20 beats per minute. This news risks sending back to the drawing board many of us who have been experimenting with biotelemetry. Here we seek to present a balanced view of the state of these and other related issues, and chart a viable path forward. Read More

  • The art of interviewing 10x engineers Crunch Network

    The art of interviewing 10x engineers

    Greylock Talent Partner Dan Portillo sat down with Twitter Head of Revenue Engineering Wade Chambers to outline the best interview process to attract and retain talent. Read More

  • Realizing the potential of drones, yet preserving our privacy Crunch Network

    Realizing the potential of drones, yet preserving our privacy

    Drones have the potential to revolutionize our lives in many ways. However, some people have concerns. In the case of drone technology, one we hear often is the possible invasion of privacy. After months of discussions, a collaborative process resulted in a consensus set of voluntary best practices that balance people’s rights to operate drones with all of our rights to privacy. Read More

  • How the VPN industry is creating its stake in online gaming Crunch Network

    How the VPN industry is creating its stake in online gaming

    From single-player, 16-bit 2D arcade games to free-to-play online multi-player games, the gaming industry has come a long way in the last decade. We can only watch with awe as newer games surprise us with their stunning graphics and engaging game play. However, more and more game developers have jumped into the fray and started catering to the online multi-player games genre. Read More

  • Engaging kids in design-based learning Crunch Network

    Engaging kids in design-based learning

    While most kids their age are glued to various digital devices, often wasting hours playing mindless games or watching cat videos, 164 fourth and fifth graders, along with eight elementary school teachers, have been using those same devices to explore new paths to learning. Read More