John Biggs

John Biggs is a writer, consultant, programmer, and the East Coast Editor for TechCrunch and runs Freemit. He writes mainly about technology, security, gadgets, gear, wristwatches, and the internet. After spending four years as an IT programmer, he switched his profession and became a full-time journalist. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Laptop, PC Upgrade, Surge, Gizmodo, Men’s Health, InSync, Linux Journal, Popular Science, Sync, and he has written a book called Black Hat: Misfits, Criminals, and Scammers in the Internet Age.

John Biggs is currently East Coast Editor of TechCrunch.com and he runs the BWL family of blogs, SlushPile.net, Audiomonger, and WristWatchReview.com. He also runs the HourTime Podcast with Ariel Adams at hourtimeshow.com. Born in 1975, he currently resides in New York, N.Y.

Crunchbase profile →

Featured Picks from John Biggs


Latest from John Biggs

  • Wiivv steps on $4 million to bring your feet into the 21st century

    Wiivv steps on $4 million to bring your feet into the 21st century

    Hardware Battlefield favorite Wiivv has announced a $4 million Series A funding and an acquisition. Not too shabby for a footwear company. But remember: this isn’t just any shoe company. Founded by Shamil Hargovan and Louis-Victor Jadavji the team at Wiivv is making and selling 3D-printed insoles. The company has sold 10,000 insoles already and they’re going to start shipping… Read More

  • Researchers simulate a ransomware attack on industrial controls

    Researchers simulate a ransomware attack on industrial controls

    Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created a form of ransomware that can hit us where it really counts: the water supply. Their program installed itself in a model water plant and allowed the researchers to change chlorine levels, shut down water valves, and send false readings to monitoring systems. “We are expecting ransomware to go one step farther, beyond the… Read More

  • What happens when you dump the App Store?

    What happens when you dump the App Store?

    In what amounts to one of the purest and most interesting experiments in assessing value of Mac OS’s App Store the founder of Rogue Amoeba posted a description of what happened when he pulled his app Piezo. The result? More revenue as a whole without much damage to sales. The impetus for the move came Apple pulled the Dash app off of the App Store. In the 100 day period since the move… Read More

  • Trump2Cash lets you invest automatically whenever the president mentions a publicly-traded company

    Trump2Cash lets you invest automatically whenever the president mentions a publicly-traded company

    With the rise of algorithmic stock trading it’s gotten harder and harder for humans to actually trade strategically. However, now that Trump’s chaotic twitter feed can make or break a company with a single mention, you can easily trade against positive or negative sentiment and make a little money in the process! An app, called Trump2Cash, is partially tongue in cheek but quite… Read More

  • VAVA’s new dash cam lets you video while you voom

    VAVA’s new dash cam lets you video while you voom

    I usually don’t like to post Kickstarters unless I’ve seen the product firsthand but I also love dash cams. What was I to do? Luckily VAVA was able to supply a demo unit so I can report that this $99 dash cam is real, works, and could let you make some clever Russian-style road videos or record conditions before an accident. Most of the dash cams I’ve seen so far have been… Read More

  • Pixl is the child-proof smartphone case that masquerades as a camera

    Pixl is the child-proof smartphone case that masquerades as a camera

    As a father I try to remember two things: my biological mission is complete and I am essentially fodder for the grave and my kids will probably destroy my smartphone. That’s why Pixlplay is particularly interesting. The Pixlplay is a smartphone case that looks like a big, bulky camera. You stuff the phone inside – it works with iOS phones for now – and plug a cable into… Read More

  • Mott & Bow are looking into your jeans

    Mott & Bow are looking into your jeans

    Alejandro Chahin knows pants. His family runs Intermoda in the Honduras and he graduated with a degree in engineering from the University of Michigan and an MBA from NYU. Now he’s making jeans. Why? Because he wants to slap a pair of nicely priced dungarees on you via the Internet. Mott & Bow – which I’m sure you’ve seen on Facebook – basically sells high… Read More

  • The Swift is a programmable robotic arm for the masses

    The Swift is a programmable robotic arm for the masses

    As a child I always lusted after the Armatron robotic arm. Oh, the amazing things I would have done! I could have assembled miniature cars! Pinched my sister remotely! Gently squashed bugs to paste! But, alas, the Armatron was too expensive and I never got one. Now that I’m old and wizened I can finally get one. Or at least something like it. The Swift by UFactory is a crowdfunded… Read More

  • Powur’s Jonathan Budd talks about the future of solar power

    Powur’s Jonathan Budd talks about the future of solar power

    Jonathan Budd sees solar power as a money-making opportunity. His new company, Powur, essentially lets people add solar to their homes with no upfront costs. While there isn’t much technology in his solution he does have some interesting ideas about the future of solar. In this podcast we talk about when he expects solar to overtake fossil fuels – not for a long time – and… Read More

  • I, for one, welcome our new robotic roti-making overlords

    I, for one, welcome our new robotic roti-making overlords

    As we carom into the future, eyes blazing with neon heat and our minds racing through millions of permutations as the Matrix embeds itself into our brain stems I think we’re all going to get a little peckish. That’s why you’re going to want a Rotimatic. This $999 robotic roti maker is like the bread makers of old with one important distinction: it makes roti. The machine has… Read More

  • Sewbo is getting closer to disrupting the sweatshop

    Sewbo is getting closer to disrupting the sweatshop

    Jon Zornow, the founder of Sewbo, made waves in September after announcing that he had built the first robot to sew a t-shirt without human intervention. Using a robot arm and an automatic sewing machine, Zornow took some carefully prepared material and ran it through a pre-programmed series of moves. It worked. Out popped a t-shirt. This seemingly simple process is actually wildly important. Read More

  • The inside story of the rise and rise of Uber

    The inside story of the rise and rise of Uber

    Brad Stone’s new book, The Upstarts, recounts the surprising rise – and possible fall – of the sharing economy. By looking at Uber and AirBnB, Stone brings life and drama to the origin stories of how a few lucky guys made the right decisions at exactly the right time. What follows is an excerpt detailing the rise of Uber. Back in the summer of 2013, just as Silicon… Read More

  • This candy sorting machine isn’t the hero the world wants but it’s the hero the world needs

    This candy sorting machine isn’t the hero the world wants but it’s the hero the world needs

    War. Famine. Drought. Imagine Dragons. The world is full of horror and what better way to assuage that grief then by watching this M&M and Skittles sorting machine do its amazing work in real time. Created by Willem Pennings the system is surprisingly robust and very well made. You can pour unsorted M&Ms into the top of the machine and a little nozzle spits out sorted candies into… Read More

  • Hardware Battlefield winner CubeSensors is reborn as Klevio

    Hardware Battlefield winner CubeSensors is reborn as Klevio

    You’re not losing a CubeSensor. You’re gaining a Klevio! Or something. CubeSensors, the company created by Ales Spetic, has folded itself into a wireless access company called Klevio to bring the tiny tech necessary to allow for keyless entry into homes and apartments. CubeSensors participated in our Hardware Battlefield and brought a set of clever environmental sensors to market… Read More

  • Information is garbage

    Information is garbage

    I’ve been reading a lot of Neil Postman lately. It’s been one of those years and I’m writing a book about fake news. Postman, the nicest guy in cultural criticism, was a folksy, friendly thinker who imagined the future in which we now live. One of his most important points, made in 1992 before the true data deluge that now befuddles us, is that information has become… Read More

  • Ransomware completely shuts down Ohio town government

    Ransomware completely shuts down Ohio town government

    In another interesting example of what happens when you don’t manage your backups correctly, the Licking County government offices, including the police force, have been shut down by ransomware. Although details are sparse, it’s clear that someone in the office caught a bug in a phishing scam or by downloading it and now their servers are locked up. Wrote Kent Mallett of the… Read More

  • Thieves now use “Shimmers” to grab Chip/PIN card data

    Thieves now use “Shimmers” to grab Chip/PIN card data

    Just when you thought it was safe to slip your card in a slot ATM skimmers have gotten just a bit smarter. New devices called Shimmers can now read your card number and, in certain instances, access your card’s chip. While the technique isn’t new – Shimmers began appearing in 2015 – they are still a huge security hole and far more dangerous than standard… Read More

  • Cardlife is yet another SaaSsy management tool

    Cardlife is yet another SaaSsy management tool

    Now that we’ve collectively signed up for billions of dollars of unused SaaS subscriptions it’s time to subscribed to a tool that helps us manage those subscriptions. Enter Cardlife, another player in the exciting world of SaaS management. “SaaS management,” you say. “Isn’t that just for the rich and famous?” No! The company manages over $4.7 million… Read More

  • Netgear exploit could expose passwords for thousands of routers

    Netgear exploit could expose passwords for thousands of routers

    It’s time to update your firmware. An exploit that affects a number of Netgear routers can easily give hackers access to your wireless admin password which could lead to router lock-out or, worse, illicit use of your Internet. The exploit, which Netgear firmly patched, used a bug found in 2014 to expose admin passwords in plain text. A researcher for Trustwave, Simon Kenin, first… Read More

  • Carnegie Mellon creates a poker-playing AI that can beat the pros

    Carnegie Mellon creates a poker-playing AI that can beat the pros

    To be great at poker you gotta know when to hold them, know when to fold them, know when to walk away, and know when to core dump. That’s only part of the technique a new AI system created by researchers at Carnegie Mellon used to beat four of the “world’s best professional poker players” – Dong Kim, Jimmy Chou, Daniel McAulay and Jason Les. The AI played the… Read More

  1. ...
  2. 6
  3. 7
  4. 8
  5. ...