John Biggs

Biggs is a contributor for TechCrunch. He has written for the New York Times, InSync, USA Weekend, Popular Mechanics, Popular Science, Money and a number of other outlets on technology and wristwatches. He is the former editor-in-chief of Gizmodo.com and lives in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. You can [Tweet him here](http://twitter.com/johnbiggs).

Disclosures: John is an unpaid advisor to Riffle, a social books platform. John is CEO of Freeport Mobile, Inc. Bre Pettis, formerly of Makerbot, is an investor.

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  • Das Keyboards is crowdfunding a cloud-connected, intelligent keyboard

    Das Keyboards is crowdfunding a cloud-connected, intelligent keyboard

    Das Keyboard, everyone’s favorite keyboard company that sounds like something Kraftwerk would carry with them on road gigs, has announced the 5Q, a smart keyboard with two-way communications to cloud servers. What does that mean? It means you can program your keyboard to flash the letter E blue when you’re outbid on eBay or have the spacebar blink wildly when your website goes down. Read More

  • I, for one, welcome our robot Elfinite aggregator overlords

    I, for one, welcome our robot Elfinite aggregator overlords

    Who needs humans when you have Elfinite? This project by Marcin Rapacz and Bartek Oliwa aims to create a robotically aggregated lists of articles. Fans of tech will receive interesting tech articles based on their interests and gleaned from their click patterns. The team has a deep background in sociology and analysis and Rapacz was an R&D director at Comarch, a Polish software house. Read More

  • Happy Atoms launches to teach kids about the wonders of molecules

    Happy Atoms launches to teach kids about the wonders of molecules

    While I absolutely despise most STEM toys I’m going to give Happy Atoms a pass simply because it is aimed at educators and not for the home market. Created by chemistry set maker Thames & Kosmos along with Pittsburgh-based Schell Games, Happy Atoms teaches kids about building molecules using magnetic atoms that connect in “happy” ways. The entire kit comes with… Read More

  • Devialet announces a golden speaker for the discerning music lover

    Devialet announces a golden speaker for the discerning music lover

    From fancy chocolates to jet airplanes to teeth, gold makes things better. Devialet took this to heart when they introduced their 4500 Watt Gold Phantom, a powerful speaker with gold-plated side panels and audio quality that, in the right environment, is out of this world. Devialet, as you recall is a French speaker company that has 80 patents in the realm of music reproduction. Their… Read More

  • Researchers make it easier to squirt out the last of the shampoo with science

    Researchers make it easier to squirt out the last of the shampoo with science

    If you’ve ever gnawed your way through a plastic bottle to get out the last delicious drops of soap you’ll be pleased to learn that researchers at The Ohio State University have created a type of plastic containing small structures that “cradle the droplets of soap aloft above tiny air pockets.” In other words, the soap never touches the bottle so it never… Read More

  • OK, Europe: It’s your move

    OK, Europe: It’s your move

    I held the first Warsaw TechCrunch Meetup in 2007 at a pub called Lolek. We were visiting my wife’s parents and I figured I would post on the site and get a few people together to see the first iPhone. Five wary people came and three left when they figured out the meetup was a dud. Two weeks ago I visited Krakow for ImpactCEE. The event was an effort to bring together politicians… Read More

  • Novelist John Sundman talks CRISPR, genetics, and logic bombs

    Novelist John Sundman talks CRISPR, genetics, and logic bombs

    Novelist John Sundman is a national treasure. His best work, Acts of the Apostles, predicts CRISPR, advanced genetic engineering, and chip-based Trojan Horses and his writing is at once dense and thrilling. I got the chance to talk with him this week for the Technotopia podcast. Sundman lives on Martha’s Vineyard and has been a tech contractor as well as a volunteer fireman and carpenter. Read More

  • ATM skimmer caught in the wild by a real security engineer

    ATM skimmer caught in the wild by a real security engineer

    Whoda thunk it? Tourist/cybersecurity expert Benjamin Tedesco was hanging out in Vienna when he walked up to an ATM. Because he trusts no one he decided to give the reader a little tug and came away with a working skimmer designed to look exactly like the card slot on the original machine. “It pays to be paranoid,” he said — and he’s right. Tedesco pulled off the… Read More

  • Omni Calculator brings math to the masses

    Omni Calculator brings math to the masses

    There are some men who want to watch the the world burn and others who want to offer it easily customizable embedded calculators. Mateusz Mucha belongs to the latter camp. Mucha is a sociologist by training who has built multiple small startups. His latest project, Omni Calculator, is completely bootstrapped and has three employees building clever calculators for various formulae. “We… Read More

  • Great ports we have loved

    As we approach a new era in computing in which thinner, lighter, and presumably more hostile devices become the norm, let’s look back on some ports we have all known and loved and that are now gone to that great e-waste yard in the sky. Read More

  • An excerpt from Eliot Peper’s cyberpunk novel Cumulus

    An excerpt from Eliot Peper’s cyberpunk novel Cumulus

    Eliot Peper has been lauded as the heir to William Gibson’s throne. He is a writer and entrepreneur based in San Francisco and is latest book, Cumulus, has become an online hit. The energy of his writing and the strength of his characters is palpable throughout the story — a world in which surveillance is constant and inescapable is fast coming true. What follows is an excerpt… Read More

  • The Perfect Memory camera will record your entire life

    The Perfect Memory camera will record your entire life

    Imagine having a perfect recall and a way to auto-edit your life into exciting, fun snippets (even if your life isn’t exciting or fun.) That’s what the Perfect Memory wireless camera aims to do. The camera, created by the team at General Streaming Systems, LLC, is an evolution on the traditional body cam. This device connects to a chain you can wear around your neck or can clip to… Read More

  • The Garmin vivoactive HR is the Swiss Army knife of health wearables

    The Garmin vivoactive HR is the Swiss Army knife of health wearables

    There are a plethora of ways to track and improve your fitness, from a simple notebook to hiring a team of Crossfit coaches who will work your core until you scream. One of the most compact and capable methods, however, might be the vivoactive HR. This $249 full-function GPS watch and heart rate tracker from Garmin is unique in that you’re supposed to wear it all the time. Not unlike… Read More

  • He wrote about clickbait but what happened next will stun you Crunch Network

    He wrote about clickbait but what happened next will stun you

    As we roll merrily into the future of media it’s time to define some terms. I spoke to a number of folks over the past few weeks about the Gawker case as well as the future of journalism and have come away with some interesting information regarding the disconnect between readers and writers and the general concept of clickbait. I’d like to clear a few things up. You did… Read More

  • Crowdsourced data can teach your phone to follow your eyes Crunch Network

    Crowdsourced data can teach your phone to follow your eyes

    Eye tracking has always been a tough problem. Multi-camera solutions existed in order to sense the position of the eyes in 3D space, but in general watching where your peepers pointed was too hard for cellphones. Now researchers at MIT and the University of Georgia have created an eye-tracking system that depends on crowdsourced data. The team created a simple app that showed a dot on the… Read More

  • Independent watch company Butler looks to an analog past and a digital future

    Independent watch company Butler looks to an analog past and a digital future

    Small watch companies are nimble. They can try lots of things including creating limited-edition pieces dedicated to archaic VOR skylanes and apps dedicated to making a pilot’s life a little easier. Take Butler, for example. The company has just released the J80, a quartz chronograph with just enough Speedmaster styling to be cool and enough uniqueness to be worth a second look. The… Read More

  • See you tonight in Warsaw

    See you tonight in Warsaw

    See you tonight in Warsaw, guys! We’ll be having our semi-annual mini-meetup at Campus Warsaw and I’d like to see you there. The Warsaw event will be held on June 13 at Campus Warsaw 27/31 Ząbkowska. It starts at 8pm and we’ll have five startups pitching on stage. The Krakow event is on June 15 at Forum Przestrzenie, 28 Marii Konopnickiej. Five different startups will pitch. Read More

  • Tech must take on hate

    Tech must take on hate

    I grew up with guns. One gun, my grandfather’s WWII Colt M1911, looms large in my memory. My father tells the story of one night when Grandpa got drunk and shot a hole in the wall of his small house in Martins Ferry, Ohio. The tale was a warning: don’t be stupid. I took it to heart. My father taught me shooting safety and took me to plink cans down by the Ohio River. In high school… Read More

  • Today is a clock that reminds you to slow down Crunch Network

    Today is a clock that reminds you to slow down

    Scott Thrift takes the long view on things. The Brooklyn-based artist has been making crazy clocks for most of this decade, starting out with the incredible ThePresent seasons clock and culminating in something he’s calling Today. His Kickstarter project for the new clock has already blown past its goal and he’s excited to bring his unique brand of time-telling to our daily lives. Read More

  • David Fine talks smart cities, the future of IoT on Technotopia Crunch Network

    David Fine talks smart cities, the future of IoT on Technotopia

    David Fine is the author of a three part series about the future of “Civic Technology” and the idea of Smart Cities. His theory – and it’s a good one – is that “as Moore’s Law continues apace, cities will continue to blanket themselves in all sorts of cheap, reliable, and (we hope) meaningful sensors. Sensors generate data, and data will serve as the… Read More