John Biggs

John Biggs is a writer, consultant, programmer, and the East Coast Editor for TechCrunch and runs Freemit. He writes mainly about technology, security, gadgets, gear, wristwatches, and the internet. After spending four years as an IT programmer, he switched his profession and became a full-time journalist. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Laptop, PC Upgrade, Surge, Gizmodo, Men’s Health, InSync, Linux Journal, Popular Science, Sync, and he has written a book called Black Hat: Misfits, Criminals, and Scammers in the Internet Age.

John Biggs is currently East Coast Editor of TechCrunch.com and he runs the BWL family of blogs, SlushPile.net, Audiomonger, and WristWatchReview.com. He also runs the HourTime Podcast with Ariel Adams at hourtimeshow.com. Born in 1975, he currently resides in New York, N.Y.

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  • The Macallan x Urwerk Flask is $2,000 worth of high-tech boozing

    The Macallan x Urwerk Flask is $2,000 worth of high-tech boozing

    In the annals of mechanical gadgets it doesn’t get much simpler than a flask. You open the top, pour booze in and close the top. Then you drink. But what if you could put two boozes into your flask? And what if you had a mechanical indicator to tell what kind of booze you were drinking? Read More

  • These magical (robotic) socks teach you to dance (robotically)

    These magical (robotic) socks teach you to dance (robotically)

    As humans find themselves forced to mate with our robotic overlords I suspect there will be some dancing. And what better way to teach us how to dance than with motors tucked into our socks? Designer Pascal Ziegler built these wild wearables to teach “dancing pairs choreography.” They’re basically vibrating socks. There is an Instructable here so you can make a pair of your… Read More

  • These jolly, candy-colored 3D-printed livers help doctors treat tumors

    These jolly, candy-colored 3D-printed livers help doctors treat tumors

    The liver is a wonderful thing. It goes great on crackers and it can keep your blood from becoming septic. But it’s almost impossible to operate on that strange, fleshy mass without a little luck and a lot of preparation. Luckily there’s now a better way to prepare. For the past few months a medical student at the Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow, Poland, Jan… Read More

  • Rock down to 38th Street for another Micro-Meetup in New York

    Rock down to 38th Street for another Micro-Meetup in New York

    In preparation for Disrupt New York in May I’m going to hold a few pitching workshops in New York for you all. We’ll listen to and critique ten pitches on March 13th at 7pm at the Knotel space at 22 West 38th Street, 4th Floor. This is an informal pitch-off but the two best teams will get two tickets to Disrupt New York and the undying admiration of millions of people (actually… Read More

  • The Sonos Playbase sits comfortably under your TV

    The Sonos Playbase sits comfortably under your TV

    While all-in-one soundbars are popular with folks who have their TVs mounted to the wall, what about the few and the brave who have their TVs standing on a table? These people have been thus far out of luck when it came to Sonos but, I’m pleased to report, their luck just changed. The Playbase (or PLAYBASE) is an all-in-one wireless speaker system designed to sit under a TV. This $699… Read More

  • Spammers expose over a billion email addresses after failed backup

    Spammers expose over a billion email addresses after failed backup

    At its height, River City Media, run by Alvin Slocombe and Matt Ferris, sent out a billion emails a day, slamming Gmail servers with fragmented traffic in order to ensure all of its email went out on time. After failing to password-protect a remote backup, however, the company has exposed its nearly 1.4 billion email records, some of which contain real names and addresses. The company, for… Read More

  • The Fossil Q Hybrid smartwatch does wearables right

    The Fossil Q Hybrid smartwatch does wearables right

    Do you really need a screen? That’s the question Fossil is asking with their clever and handsome Fossil Q Hybrid smartwatch, an analog watch that hides all of its smarts behind an understated face. This type of watch has become more common with watchmakers like Skagen and Michael Kors jumping on the bandwagon. Many of the manufactures use movements from MMT and others and most of them… Read More

  • Let’s meet at the March Micro-Meetup in New York!

    Let’s meet at the March Micro-Meetup in New York!

    In preparation for Disrupt New York in May I’m going to hold a few pitching workshops in New York for you all. We’ll listen to and critique ten pitches on March 13th at 7pm at the Knotel space at 22 West 38th Street, 4th Floor. This is an informal pitch-off but the two best teams will get two tickets to Disrupt New York and the undying admiration of millions of people (actually… Read More

  • The Pixel 2.0 is a tiny OLED screen for your wearable Arduino pleasure

    The Pixel 2.0 is a tiny OLED screen for your wearable Arduino pleasure

    The tiny Pixel 2.0 is basically an Arduino board wedded to a tiny 1.5″ 128×128 color OLED screen. This means you can stick it inside a wearable and address the screen directly from the Arduino board, an improvement on current “solder the screen to the Arduino and hope it works” world of DIY electronics. This teeny-weeny board costs $75 on Kickstarter and should ship in June. Read More

  • New skimmers fit right on top of chip and PIN credit card scanners

    New skimmers fit right on top of chip and PIN credit card scanners

    As usual Mr. Krebs has some great images of a credit card skimmer found in the wild. This model uses Samsung phone parts and lays right over the Ingenico card scanners you’ve probably seen in stores. The interesting thing is that these scanners also support chip and PIN technology but, as evidenced by the photo, it looks like the retailer disabled it essentially sending the scanner back… Read More

  • The $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W is the teeniest little Wi-Fi-enabled computer you’ve ever seen

    The $10 Raspberry Pi Zero W is the teeniest little Wi-Fi-enabled computer you’ve ever seen

    When the original $5 Raspberry Pi Zero came out – to much fanfare, I might add – users connected it to all sorts of things. They made micro gaming rigs that ran on the 1GHz single-core CPU and added Pi Hats – little breakout boards – to power robots and sensors. Now you can do all that but without worrying about a Wi-Fi or Bluetooth dongle. The $10 Pi Zero W is the… Read More

  • Kado wants to make the world’s thinnest charger

    Kado wants to make the world’s thinnest charger

    What can you wrap up in ribbons? Stick in your sock? And what can you take out in public and not get thrown in the dock? The Kado phone charger, of course. This new product by Itay Hasid and Daniel Assis is making the rounds at MWC and is essentially the “world’s thinnest wall charger for smartphones.” Obviously a wall charger isn’t that exciting but the pair raised… Read More

  • Kinetise now lets you download the code you make in their drag and drop app creator

    Kinetise now lets you download the code you make in their drag and drop app creator

    The world of mobile development is a hairy one. You can code things yourself and hurt your brain on React Native or you can use a drag-and-drop editor and get locked into one platform forever. But now app development house Kinetise is offering the best of both worlds. Kinetise, who I’ve talked about for years as an interesting alternative to coding your own Android and iOS apps, came… Read More

  • The mainstream media is not dead

    The mainstream media is not dead

    The next decade will be one of immense change. The future of humanity will be decided – do we go to space or stay put, do we survive the changes coming? Further, many establishments will die. The publishing industry, burdened and drowned by the long tail, will sink. Music and movies will take new shapes, shapes as revolutionary as the talkie was to the zoetrope. Basically… Read More

  • The Hardlight VR Suit will vibrate all of your bodily buttons

    Have you ever wanted to feel smack of the punches coming at you from sweaty aliens? The whang of bullet hitting your guts? The feeling of hitting the deck as pirates stream over the virtual bow? The subtle vibration of the VR sexual encounter with a many-tentacled sex robot? Well here we go. The Hardlight VR Suit is ready to please. This vest contains multiple vibrational elements and can add… Read More

  • DeepCoder builds programs using code it finds lying around

    DeepCoder builds programs using code it finds lying around

    Like all great programmers I get most of my code from StackOverflow questions. Can’t figure out how to add authentication to Flask? Easy. Want to shut down sendmail? Boom. Now, thanks to all the code on the Internet, a robot can be as smart as a $180,000 coder. The system, called DeepCoder, basically searches a corpus of code to build a project that works to spec. It’s been used… Read More

  • These 3D-printed sunglasses will fit your oddly-shaped head

    These 3D-printed sunglasses will fit your oddly-shaped head

    I’m not saying your head is oddly shaped, per se, but if you have trouble finding glasses that fit then a team from Cambridge, Massachusetts has a pair for you. Their Falcon I glasses are designed to fit you perfectly and won’t touch your cheeks, spread over your wider face, or frustrate you by slipping off. The $229 shades come in a sporty style and are aimed at bikers and runners. Read More

  • MIT creates an intelligent power supply that lets hardware sip energy

    MIT creates an intelligent power supply that lets hardware sip energy

    Researchers at MIT have created a power supply for small electronic devices that “sips” energy by turning devices on with packets of energy rather than a steady stream. Most power converters release a steady voltage. This means they’re generally inefficient for small devices like sensors and other devices that don’t need to be constantly on. The MIT’s… Read More

  • Citrix CEO Kirill Tatarinov talks about punch cards and the 3D future

    Citrix CEO Kirill Tatarinov talks about punch cards and the 3D future

    Kirill Tatarinov has seen computing from bottom to top. As a student in the USSR he wrote programs on punch cards to manage the cutting edge hardware clones that Russia was churning out and now, as CEO of Citrix, he’s working on the next generation of managed computing. His vision for the future is simple: he thinks 3D will be the next big UI shift and that we need to be ready. Tatarinov… Read More

  • What’s next for books?

    What’s next for books?

    I like Digital Reader editor Nate Hoffelder. He is one of the few bloggers about publishing who doesn’t suck up to the industry, nor does he particularly gild the lily. He basically believes that books are great, publishing is probably doomed and that writing is really important. That’s why I was happy that he surfaced and debunked the claims of Chip McGregor, an agent who… Read More