John Biggs

John Biggs is a writer, consultant, programmer, former East Coast Editor and current contributing writer for TechCrunch. He writes mainly about technology, security, gadgets, gear, wristwatches, and the internet. After spending four years as an IT programmer, he switched his profession and became a full-time journalist. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Laptop, PC Upgrade, Surge, Gizmodo, Men’s Health, InSync, Linux Journal, Popular Science, Sync, and he has written a book called Black Hat: Misfits, Criminals, and Scammers in the Internet Age.

He builds products, writes books, and consults with startups to help them make cool things.

John Biggs runs the BWL family of blogs, SlushPile.net, Audiomonger, and WristWatchReview.com. He also runs the HourTime Podcast with Ariel Adams at hourtimeshow.com. Born in 1975, he currently resides in Brooklyn, NY.

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Latest from John Biggs

  • How to run a token sale

    How to run a token sale

    Seed funding is drying up. Accelerators are scrambling for revenue. Things are changing drastically in the startup ecosystem. So how do you raise money when your product needs more than some Django code and an AWS instance? You run an ICO, right? Read More

  • Music and Muzak

    Music and Muzak

    We are facing a firehose. Data spews at us from all angles, inundating us with ideas, culture, and creativity. We produce terabytes of information a year, changing the world as we know it. We are the most culturally aware generations in existence. Or are we? An interesting recent post on Marginal Revolution post gives lie to the idea that the world is moving faster than ever. In fact, they… Read More

  • The PocketBeagle is the tiniest and most whimsically-named single-board computer on the market

    The PocketBeagle is the tiniest and most whimsically-named single-board computer on the market

    Do you need a Linux machine about as big as a few quarters? Man, have I got something for you. It’s called the BeagleBoard PocketBeagle and it’s the smallest Linux computer you can buy for $25. I’m a huge fan of single-board computers for one simple reason: in my childhood, the technology that enables these things simply didn’t exist. Further, a little kit like this… Read More

  • August announces new smart locks and a smart doorbell

    August announces new smart locks and a smart doorbell

    August has updated its smart lock line with a new Pro version with Bluetooth, HomeKit, and Wi-Fi support, as well as the more basic model for $149. They’ve also announced the Doorbell Cam Pro for $199 that lets you see visitors approaching your domicile, even at night. The August is unique in that it depends entirely on the phone for usage, improving security but eschewing the keypad. Read More

  • The Nuada smart glove gives your hand bionic powers

    The Nuada smart glove gives your hand bionic powers

    In the future, said Andy Warhol, everyone will be bionic for fifteen minutes. I’m paraphrasing, but it looks like a Portuguese company called Nuada is about to give us that opportunity. Created by Filipe Quinaz and Vitor Crespo, the seed-funded company pitched on our Disrupt stage and showed us one of the coolest pieces of hardware I’ve seen in a long time. The Nuada is a smart glove. Read More

  • Decentralizing Everything with Ethereum's Vitalik Buterin

    Ethereum will match Visa in scale in a ‘couple of years’ says founder

    The mind behind Ethereum, Vitalik Buterin, is matter-of-fact about the crypto. In short, he believes what interviewer Naval Ravikant called “brain virus” is the true future of security and economics and, with the right incentives, Ethereum can replace things like credit card networks and even gaming servers. Buterin separates the world into two kinds of people. “There’s… Read More

  • Zoe Quinn talks about online abuse and her new book, Crash Override

    Zoe Quinn talks about online abuse and her new book, Crash Override

    Zoe Quinn went to the heart of Gamergate and has come back with a new book, Crash Override, a meditation on online communities and making the Internet safer. Quinn spoke with me for a few minutes about her new book and how we can help prevent kids from going down the Gamergate path. Her ultimate solution? Talking to people who harass her. By putting a voice to the name she was able to defuse… Read More

  • Metacert’s Paul Walsh on ICOs, phishing, and the future of fake news

    Metacert’s Paul Walsh on ICOs, phishing, and the future of fake news

    Metacert is a company that hunts down and kills fake news. Created by Paul Walsh, it can assess whether or not a link is trustworthy and warn you before you click. Further, he’s found great traction with ICO creators who are using the software to keep people from sending their investors to doctored websites. In this episode of Technotopia I talked to Paul about his work with fake news… Read More

  • This battery-free cellphone runs on light and radio waves

    This battery-free cellphone runs on light and radio waves

    Who cares about an OLED and a notch when your phone can sip power from its surroundings, allowing you to make calls without ever having to charge your phone. This wild cellphone is part of a Google Faculty Research program and received three U.S. National Science Foundation grants for total investment of about $2 million. For that money, the creator, Vamsi Talla, built a single-board… Read More

  • It’s not hard to beat Rolex, Apple

    It’s not hard to beat Rolex, Apple

    A collective Internet gasp went up yesterday when, once again, the Apple Watch beat most major watch companies in terms of revenue. It’s not surprising not that the Apple Watch outsold Rolex and Omega and other luxury watch makers. What is surprising is that Rolex and Omega are still fighting this losing battle. Think about the Rolex market, for example. While I would wager that almost… Read More

  • New Bluetooth vulnerability can hack a phone in 10 seconds

    New Bluetooth vulnerability can hack a phone in 10 seconds

    Security company Armis has found a collection of eight exploits, collectively called BlueBorne, that can allow an attacker access to your phone without touching it. The attack can allow access to computers and phones, as well as IoT devices. “Armis believes many more vulnerabilities await discovery in the various platforms using Bluetooth. These vulnerabilities are fully operational, and… Read More

  • Dodles brings your doodles to life

    Dodles brings your doodles to life

    I’ve always wanted to create my own animations. One idea is simple. My characters would be born, live, fall in love, and die in real time in a 80 year long masterpiece of constant animation. It would be a commentary on the death of the soul and the deep longing of men and women to be truly understood. My more complex idea would involve a princess who has to fight a dragon. With… Read More

  • The Jammy is a steel string guitar that fits in a pocket

    The Jammy is a steel string guitar that fits in a pocket

    As a fan of electronic guitars — as opposed to plain-old electrics — the Jammy seems like a very interesting piece of kit. Designed to be played like a regular guitar, you fret on the top part of the neck and strum the strings on the bottom half. Because it has only five frets you change the octave by pulling the neck out from 0 to the full length of 12 inches. Read More

  • Two new handhelds will help you relive the golden age of gaming

    Two new handhelds will help you relive the golden age of gaming

    Whether you’re an older gamer who remembers the Atari 2600 and Sega Genesis with great fondness or a doting grandparent who doesn’t remember exactly what the grandkids wanted (the Nintendo Swamp or something?), the new AtGames portable consoles will either excite you to no end or cause deep disappointment. These crazy little consoles contain dozens of Atari or Genesis games. The… Read More

  • A perfect storm of corporate idiocy

    A perfect storm of corporate idiocy

    At this point in the game there should be a single page on every corporate website, preferably accessible from its front page, that includes the name and all contact details for the Chief Security Officer, including the last four digits of her social security number. It should be her responsibility to ensure that no one uses this information for nefarious purposes in addition to her daily… Read More

  • It’s time to build our own Equifax with blackjack and crypto

    It’s time to build our own Equifax with blackjack and crypto

    The private data of 143 million Equifax “customers” is now available for download. Have no doubt: This means you will be hacked. This means your SIM card can be spoofed. This means someone will try to get into your email and online accounts. This means someone will try to open a credit card in your name. This crass, callow, and lazy treatment of our digital data cannot stand. Read More

  • Why I still wear the Apple Watch

    Why I still wear the Apple Watch

    In the summer, Draco, the dragon, would have wheeled above, clawing at Ursa Minor. Gemini would have ridden across Clinton Street and up the old Canal as Ursa Major reared and fell. And, with the help of his powerful, handmade, bespoke watch, Packard would have been able to plot the locations of all these constellations and more. Packard – he of the Packard Motor Car Company and… Read More

  • Make your own 3D-printed mask that reacts to your emotions

    Make your own 3D-printed mask that reacts to your emotions

    This wild mask which looks like a cross between Hello Kitty and a face-hugger is made of soft electronics and colored liquid. It is based on a Masters thesis project made by Sirou Peng, Adi Meyer, and Silvia Rueda and uses Harvard’s Soft Robotics Toolkit. The mask is mapped to the wearer’s face and uses a Myoware muscle sensor to assess the patterns your face makes when you… Read More

  • The Tortilla Drone is the flying robot we’ve all been waiting for

    The Tortilla Drone is the flying robot we’ve all been waiting for

    You’ve seen it all before: a drone takes off in an open field, everything is clear. The drone flies straight up for a moment then, on the way down, it hits a tree. A moment later the whole thing is a mess. Plastic everywhere, the motors whizzing and failing, a camera flinging off and into the bushes. Disaster! But what if you could easily take that broken drone, fry it, and dip it into… Read More

  • Tech’s ‘give back’ moment

    Tech’s ‘give back’ moment

    We now exist an interesting interstitial moment, one defined by big corporations producing much of the innovation and some of the world’s richest companies – Apple, Amazon, Uber, Facebook – trying to solve big hairy problems. These are the problems that startups would have once solved but because they are so expensive – I’m talking about commercial VR… Read More

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