John Biggs

John Biggs is a writer, consultant, programmer, and the East Coast Editor for TechCrunch and runs Freemit. He writes mainly about technology, security, gadgets, gear, wristwatches, and the internet. After spending four years as an IT programmer, he switched his profession and became a full-time journalist. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Laptop, PC Upgrade, Surge, Gizmodo, Men’s Health, InSync, Linux Journal, Popular Science, Sync, and he has written a book called Black Hat: Misfits, Criminals, and Scammers in the Internet Age.

John Biggs is currently East Coast Editor of TechCrunch.com and he runs the BWL family of blogs, SlushPile.net, Audiomonger, and WristWatchReview.com. He also runs the HourTime Podcast with Ariel Adams at hourtimeshow.com. Born in 1975, he currently resides in New York, N.Y.

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Latest from John Biggs

  • MB&F unveils the racing-inspired Horological Machine 8

    MB&F unveils the racing-inspired Horological Machine 8

    Long dedicated to space, spiders, and robots, MB&F has finally come back to earth with the Horological Machine 8, a new watch inspired by the silhouette of Can-Am race cars. This watch is part of the “Horological Machine” series, a set of handmade watches that look like a cross between something that belongs on a Jules Verne submarine and a piece of expensive chocolate. This… Read More

  • The SMOVE stabilizes and charges your phone for steady video shoots

    The SMOVE stabilizes and charges your phone for steady video shoots

    When unmanned aerial vehicle makers and gimbal engineers get together they like to have a few beers and make something like the SMOVE. Designed to connect to a regular smartphone the SMOVE is basically a steadicam for your iOS or Android device, allowing you to take steady shots in rough conditions, follow faces in front of the camera, and even take seamless panoramas. The SMOVE team… Read More

  • Hofstra bans private Wi-Fi, charges $200 for network connectivity during debate

    Hofstra bans private Wi-Fi, charges $200 for network connectivity during debate

    In an exciting bit of pre-debate frisson, journalists covering the presidential debate at Hofstra University are now Tweet they have to pay $200 for Wi-Fi access on site and, more importantly, the ones who have paid now have no Internet at all. Aaaaaaaaand the $200 Wi-Fi Hofstra forced the reporters to buy at the #debate? It's down. — emily (((dreyfuss))) (@EmilyDreyfuss) September… Read More

  • AirServer can now transmit your iPhone screen to your Xbox

    AirServer, makers of software that essentially turns anything into an AirPlay sever, has announced the availability of AirServer for the Xbox One. That means you can transmit your AirPlay screens to your gaming console, thereby creating a black hole of Microsoft-on-Apple madness. Air Server also lets you transmit via Google Cast and Miracast. The software is available now for $9.99 and… Read More

  • Brian Solis talks about why AI won’t suck

    Brian Solis talks about why AI won’t suck

    This week I got the chance to talk to a private hero of mine, Brian Solis. Solis is a digital analyst and speaker who talks about the future and how big brands – Coke, IBM – will interact with humans. His new book X is out now and it’s designed to help big companies survive the changing tides of business and tech. Luckily, however, Solis didn’t just focus on his… Read More

  • Papa, what’s a shitpost?

    Papa, what’s a shitpost?

    As we romp further into this silly and messy political season it’s come to light that Palmer Luckey, creator of the Oculus Rift and the boy who was last seen floating in a tropical paradise on the cover of time magazine, was the money man behind a group of Trump supporters calling themselves Nimble America. They dedicated the non-profit to proving “that shitposting is powerful and… Read More

  • Stick a Raspberry Pi into a Nintendo cartridge for some retro DIY fun

    Stick a Raspberry Pi into a Nintendo cartridge for some retro DIY fun

    In a particularly clever if destructive hack, a maker named Zach cleared out the guts of an NES cartridge and stuck in a Raspberry Pi Zero and an Amazon USB hub to create the ultimate retro NES emulator. It even fits back into its original sleeve for easy storage. The project is surprisingly simple. All you really need to do is crack the cartridge case and position the parts. Then… Read More

  • The JBL Reflect Aware is the first of a new crop of Lightning-only headphones

    The JBL Reflect Aware is the first of a new crop of Lightning-only headphones

    As we hurtle noiselessly into a dystopian future, headphone makers have already started offering Lightning-only earbuds, something that should give early adopters some solace but might be a hard sell for folks with a shoebox full of tangled traditional earbuds. But the future is here and JBL Reflect Aware is the first active-noise canceling soldier in the battle against the headphone… Read More

  • Pharma hackers create a DIY EpiPen, the EpiPencil

    Pharma hackers create a DIY EpiPen, the EpiPencil

    The EpiPen, a spring-loaded device full epinephrine, of has entered the pantheon of modern pharmaceutical chicanery of late after its maker raised its price to $600 a unit. Now, however, you can make your own EpiPencil for about $30. The EpiPencil is a project by the Four Thieves Vinegar Collective, a group of pharma hackers who are trying to loosen medicine from its arguably necessary… Read More

  • Makerbot doubles-down on its sure bets, professionals and teachers

    Makerbot doubles-down on its sure bets, professionals and teachers

    The promise of premium home 3D printing hasn’t panned out. Hobbyist printers are common and cheap these days – there are plenty of models at around $500, the price of a really good laser printer – but the original vision of a 3D printer on every desk didn’t quite pan out. And Makerbot learned that piece of news the hard way. When the company started it was the brand… Read More

  • The Ripple Rug: You know, for cats

    The Ripple Rug: You know, for cats

    Of all the products I’ve seen this year, none are more worthy of our time and attention than the Ripple Rug. Created by Fred and Natasha Ruckel, the Ripple Rug is a rug with holes and lumps in it. Your cat can climb inside, stick its paws out, and generally get all up inside that business. It’s 35 inches on each side and made of recycled plastic bottles. Why is the Ripple Rug… Read More

  • Consumer Physics, creators of the SCiO molecular scanner, respond to Kickstarter claims

    Consumer Physics, creators of the SCiO molecular scanner, respond to Kickstarter claims

    Like most small products with a cult following, SCiO has its fans and detractors. Those detractors took to the Internet recently to complain that the handheld molecular scanner, which raised $2.5 million in 2014, still hasn’t shipped. The result? Negative press and plenty of Tweets. I asked SCiO’s creator, Dror Sharon, what was going on with the device and when it would ship and… Read More

  • Behold! It’s the tiniest MAME cabinet in the galaxy

    Behold! It’s the tiniest MAME cabinet in the galaxy

    In the world of MAME cabinetry – essentially a subculture of arcade lovers who build amazing cabinets for their emulators – the goal is usually to either recreate the arcade games of yore or build something really wild. Adafruit built something really wild. Originally a weekend project, this MAME cabinet is a few inches tall and uses a screen about as big as a thumbnail. The kit is… Read More

  • SCiO, the pocket-sized molecular analyzer, is making everyone angry

    SCiO, the pocket-sized molecular analyzer, is making everyone angry

    We were all pretty excited when Consumer Physics showed us their hand-held molecular scanner at TechCrunch Disrupt two years ago. They garnered much praise here and all over the web for creating a hand-held product that could scan and identify food, medicine, and vitamins. Now, two years later, people are pissed.
    The project raised $2.7 million from 130,000 backers and it looked, at least on… Read More

  • Estimote announces the Mirror, a dongle that turns any TV into a smart beacon system

    Imagine walking into a store, picking up a pair of shoes, and seeing specs for the kicks appear on a TV next to the display. Or imagine standing in front of an airport departures screen and seeing your flight appear and then a map displaying the best route to your gate. These use cases were supposed to be the killer app for beacons and, finally, these dreams are being realized. The Mirror… Read More

  • Tuurnt connects you with friends with some unique social tools

    Tuurnt connects you with friends with some unique social tools

    Fabrice Mishiki wanted to create a social media tool to help connect influencers, fans, and friends together in a way that hadn’t been done before. He created Tuurnt. The app starts with your traditional social sharing system. You take videos or photos and post them. Your friends can reply with their own videos and, if you get enough responses, the video stays up and popular for longer. Read More

  • The Robusto is one of the strongest and lightest watches in the crowdfunding universe

    The Robusto is one of the strongest and lightest watches in the crowdfunding universe

    Watches like the Omega Ploprof and, now, the bulbous-looking Robusto, are designed for rough and ready wear. The watch, created by a Dutch company called Time22 features a titanium case and automatic movement and should be able to withstand pressure, smacks, and damage. The watch is made of Grade 5 titanium and is water-resistant to 200 meters. It runs an ETA or quartz movement and starts at… Read More

  • A new wearable generator creates electricity from body heat

    A new wearable generator creates electricity from body heat

    Now your sweaty body can power your phone. Like Neo in the Matrix, a new system created by researchers at North Carolina State University lets you generate electricity with a wearable device. Previous systems used massive, rigid heat sinks. This system uses a body-conforming patch that can generate 20 μW per centimeter squared. Previous systems generated only 1 microwatt or less. The… Read More

  • The ProDrone PD6B-AW-ARM can arrange your deck furniture for you

    The ProDrone PD6B-AW-ARM can arrange your deck furniture for you

    Another day, another drone that can perch on fences like a bird and carry deck chairs around in its scary claws. Officially called the PD6B-AW-ARM, this drone is made by Prodrone in Japan and features two robotic arms. The 6-rotor drone can lift up to 44 pounds and lasts for 30 minutes on a charge. The drone can lift objects and can even come to rest perched on a fence or railing, a feature… Read More

  • ScriptBook uses AI to pull great movie scripts from the slush pile

    ScriptBook uses AI to pull great movie scripts from the slush pile

    While not every movie can be Mr. Lovejoy, robots can now help producers find great films by sorting and scoring scripts based on actors, plot, and endings. Think of it as a robotic replacement for the Hollywood page. The startup that does this is called Scriptbook and it automatically reads and scores scripts, offering Hollywood fat cats the ability to choose winners over flops. The company… Read More

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