John Biggs

John Biggs is a writer, consultant, programmer, former East Coast Editor and current contributing writer for TechCrunch. He writes mainly about technology, security, gadgets, gear, wristwatches, and the internet. After spending four years as an IT programmer, he switched his profession and became a full-time journalist. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Laptop, PC Upgrade, Surge, Gizmodo, Men’s Health, InSync, Linux Journal, Popular Science, Sync, and he has written a book called Black Hat: Misfits, Criminals, and Scammers in the Internet Age.

He builds products, writes books, and consults with startups to help them make cool things.

John Biggs runs the BWL family of blogs, SlushPile.net, Audiomonger, and WristWatchReview.com. He also runs the HourTime Podcast with Ariel Adams at hourtimeshow.com. Born in 1975, he currently resides in Brooklyn, NY.

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Latest from John Biggs

  • SEC shuts down Munchee ICO

    SEC shuts down Munchee ICO

    In what should be an interesting beginning to the coming avalanche of ICO failures, the SEC has come down hard on Munchee, a company that built a $15 million token sale. The SEC chairman recently noted that coin offerings are, in fact, securities and that pre-sale participants must be registered with the SEC. The Munchee ICO aimed to fund the MUN coin, a payment system for restaurant reviews. Read More

  • MakeX announces the first 3D-printing backpack

    MakeX announces the first 3D-printing backpack

    In the year 2020, when the Earth is overrun by aliens, it will be mandated by the Galactic Council of Extraterrestrial Life that all children must walk around with 3D-printing backpacks. Why not get a head start with the MakeX Migo backpack that lets you carry your ultra-small 3D printer anywhere you need to go? This wild, see-through backpack is designed to hold a Migo 3D Printer (the thing… Read More

  • Some HP laptops are hiding a deactivated keylogger

    Some HP laptops are hiding a deactivated keylogger

    Researcher Michael Myng found a deactivated keylogger in a piece of software found on over 460 HP laptop models. A full list of affected laptops is here. The keylogger is deactivated by default but could represent a privacy concern if an attacker has physical access to the computer. “Some time ago someone asked me if I can figure out how to control HP’s laptop keyboard… Read More

  • Researchers train robots to see into the future

    Researchers train robots to see into the future

    Robots usually react in real time: something happens, they respond. Now researchers University of California, Berkeley are working on a system that lets robots “imagine the future of their actions” so that they can interact with things they’ve never seen before. The technology is called visual foresight and it allows “robots to predict what their cameras will see if… Read More

  • Why is bitcoin’s price so high?

    Why is bitcoin’s price so high?

    Bitcoin’s price has risen stratospherically, a fact that leaves many minor players in the market with massive gains and many bigger players millionaires. But is this a bubble? Are the gains real? And are the bitcoin whales in for a sad Christmas? First we must understand what drives bitcoin price and, in particular, this boom. The common understanding for current growth leads us back… Read More

  • Echofin is Slack for financial professionals

    Echofin is Slack for financial professionals

    Historically, financial organizations have watched forlornly through the front window while startups have adopted new and cool tools like Slack, Twitter, and Convo. Now they can join in the fun with something called Echofin. You can imagine the product as a sort of hyper-powered Slack for financial groups. Users can message each other and view portfolios and investment news and small groups… Read More

  • Gomer is a soft robot that can bother your cat

    Gomer is a soft robot that can bother your cat

    If there’s any sort of trend in robotics this year it’s soft hands. Robots with soft pincers are quite useful in picking up – and not breaking – objects and now you can enjoy a soft-handed robot at home. The robot is called Gomer and it’s available now on Indiegogo. The little robot had an expressive face and a big claw on top. You can play games with Gomer –… Read More

  • PiTunnel connects your Raspberry Pi to the world

    PiTunnel connects your Raspberry Pi to the world

    Raspberry Pis are usually very lonely. These tiny, single-board computers sit quietly under desks or inside 3D printed cases, staring wistfully into the far distance while waiting for a little attention. Now, thanks to a side project by a programmer named Dimitri Raftopoulos, an app called PiTunnel ensures your Pi need not be alone anymore. The project exposes your Pi to the outside world… Read More

  • Digital ethicist James Williams talks about the rise of bad social media

    Digital ethicist James Williams talks about the rise of bad social media

    James Williams is a doctoral candidate at the Oxford Internet Institute. He studies the ethics of attention and persuasion in technology design and spoke with us about the rise of attention-grabbing advertising and media and how we can fight back against the onslaught. I talked to him just before Thanksgiving for this enlightening episode of Technotopia. Before fighting against bad… Read More

  • Kinin puts aromatherapy in your mouth

    Kinin puts aromatherapy in your mouth

    Kinin is a new portable aromatherapy vaporizer that, in theory, offers a refreshing break from THC and nicotine based vapes. Multi-use products let you inhale the strange fragrances of “Narrow leaf eucalyptus,” “Polynesian kava kava,” and “nootropics.” The product is part of the new trend toward healthier vaping and is aimed at yoga lovers and other… Read More

  • WICASTR brings data to the edge

    WICASTR brings data to the edge

    Content distribution is hard. You want to keep enough of it close enough to favorite customers so they don’t have to wait and reduce latency for new data. That’s why WICASTR created the SMART Edge Platform, a system for sending content to the very edges of the network, including compatible local routers and access points. “WICASTR is an ‘all in one solution’ for… Read More

  • Notch can record your body movements

    Notch can record your body movements

    Notch creators Eszter Ozsvald and Stepan Boltalin have been working on their project since 2013 and are finally ready to unveil their final product on the Disrupt Berlin stage. The company, which received funding through SOSVentures and Hax Accelerator, allows users to scan their bodies in motion, allowing for powerful analytics on golf swings, gymnastics, routines and everyday… Read More

  • The attack of the SuperFakes

    The attack of the SuperFakes

    Seven years ago, watch fan Andrew Dakin bought a Movado watch on eBay for $500. It looked like a mint timepiece, well-maintained and classically styled. He had just started collecting watches, so he was happy to get a deal on a unique and valuable timepiece. Read More

  • Create the unholy DIY union of Alexa and Furby this weekend

    Create the unholy DIY union of Alexa and Furby this weekend

    As we approach the End Times there will be great signs and portents. They say the dead will rise and walk the earth. Great fire will come from the sky and burn the wicked and the good alike. A Furby will speak in the voice of Alexa. The Turtle of the Universe will cough up her young to pass judgement on our collective consciousness. At least one of those things has just come true. In this… Read More

  • Economist Tyler Cowen talks about the value of despair

    Economist Tyler Cowen talks about the value of despair

    In this episode of Technotopia I talk to Tyler Cowen, a professor of Economics at George Mason University and an editor at one of my favorite sites, MarginalRevolution. Cowen is one of the smartest people I’ve spoken and to and his assessments of the global economic future is at once uplifting – the continued rise of the pleasant suburb – and scary – the unclear position… Read More

  • YouTube is not for kids

    YouTube is not for kids

    I’ve been thinking a lot about this important if long Medium post by James Bridle regarding the nonsensical and potentially damaging kids content on YouTube. In it he moves from video to video, finding stranger and stranger examples. Further, an exodus of advertising is hitting the service as some disgusting comments were found below videos aimed at kids and of kids. Strangers with… Read More

  • Researchers create a light-based key distribution system for quantum encryption

    Researchers create a light-based key distribution system for quantum encryption

    Researchers at Duke University, OSU and Oak Ridge National Laboratory have solved one of the biggest problems with new forms of quantum encryption: quantum key distribution. QKD is the process of distributing keys during a transmission and in a way that will tell both sides of the conversation that someone is eavesdropping. The new system, which uses lasers to transmit multiple bits at once… Read More

  • iOS jailbreak repositories close as user interest wanes

    iOS jailbreak repositories close as user interest wanes

    A few years ago jailbreaking your iPhone was all the rage. The cat-and-mouse game of hackers versus Apple was great fun and some of the open source products available to jailbreakers – namely the Cydia alternative app store – added amazing features and customizability to the iPhone. Some devs even launched only on jailbroken phones, thumbing their noses at Apple’s walled… Read More

  • Find your red-eyed fans

    Find your red-eyed fans

    I’ve been thinking about token sale marketing lately mostly because it’s been so bad. I’ve gotten hundreds of emails asking me to be an ICO advisor or evangelist or influencer primarily because the ICO marketing techniques come to us straight out of the spammiest corners of affiliate marketing. I’ve gotten emails from founders who have been promised “posts on… Read More

  • 13 great board games to play with family and friends

    Board games are a blast. They’re cheap to buy, fun to give, and amazing to play. We’ve chosen twelve of our favorites that you can add to your stack of games this Holiday Season. Some pit you against each other; others have you working together to save the world. Order in, crack a few beers (or seltzers) and have a blast! Read More

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