Frederic Lardinois

Frederic has spent more than five years covering news and providing analysis about technology, the industry and consumer tech related to the Internet with potential to influence industry direction. At TechCrunch, his focus spans from emerging technologies and niche startups to major product advances by industry titans – all innovation focused. Before he joined TechCrunch in 2012, he founded Silicon Filter and wrote for ReadWriteWeb (now ReadWrite).

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  • Google launches committed-use discounts for its Cloud Platform

    Google launches committed-use discounts for its Cloud Platform

    At its Cloud Next event in San Francisco, Google today announced the beta of a new pricing option for virtual machines on its Google Compute Platform. These new committed-use discounts lock you into a one- or three-year commitment. You decide how many cores and how much memory you want to buy in bulk for those years, but you can then distribute that allotment between machines at will. In… Read More

  • Triplebyte expands its recruiting platform beyond YC and signs up Apple and Facebook

    Triplebyte expands its recruiting platform beyond YC and signs up Apple and Facebook

    Triplebyte wants to make recruiting and technical screening for tech companies more efficient. The screening process happens background-blind, so instead of putting the emphasis on the applicants’ resumes (and the colleges they went to), it emphasizes programming smarts. Read More

  • Google’s new machine learning API recognizes objects in videos

    Google’s new machine learning API recognizes objects in videos

    At its Cloud Next conference in San Francisco, Google today announced the launch of a new machine learning API for automatically recognizing objects in videos and making them searchable. The new Video Intelligence API will allow developers to build applications that can automatically extract entities from a video. Until now, most similar image recognition APIs available in the cloud only… Read More

  • Rackspace now offers managed services for Google’s Cloud Platform

    Rackspace now offers managed services for Google’s Cloud Platform

    Rackspace today announced it’s expanding its managed service portfolio to include support for the Google Cloud Platform. Until now, the company only supported clients who wanted to use Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure or OpenStack cloud. Now, Google and Rackspace are collaborating on the new managed services offering, which is scheduled to launch later this year (with the exact… Read More

  • Google is acquiring data science community Kaggle

    Google is acquiring data science community Kaggle

    Sources tell us that Google is acquiring Kaggle, a platform that hosts data science and machine learning competitions. Details about the transaction remain somewhat vague, but given that Google is hosting its Cloud Next conference in San Francisco this week, the official announcement could come as early as tomorrow. Reached by phone, Kaggle co-founder CEO Anthony Goldbloom declined to… Read More

  • MongoDB’s Atlas database service goes freemium

    MongoDB’s Atlas database service goes freemium

    MongoDB is still best known for its flagship NoSQL database product, but last year, the company also launched Atlas, a managed database-as-a-service offering that runs on AWS. At the time, MongoDB only offered a paid version of this service (which made sense, given that the company has to pay AWS for its servers), but starting today, it’ll offer a free tier to developers who want to… Read More

  • Duolingo brings Tinycards to the web

    Duolingo brings Tinycards to the web

    Last July, with the launch of Tinycards, Duolingo went beyond its core language learning services for the first time in its history. Back then, Tinycards, which uses the popular spaced repetition technique to help its users learn anything from vocabulary to equations and history facts, was only available as an iOS app. Starting today, it will also be available on the web. There are no… Read More

  • Google Allo gets improved GIF and emoji support, easier access to Google Assistant

    Google Allo gets improved GIF and emoji support, easier access to Google Assistant

    Allo, the messaging app Google launched into a crowded market last September, is getting an update today. The update focuses on improved support for emoji and GIFs (because that is, after all, what the world needs), and easier access to the Google Assistant. As far as we can tell, Allo has been anything but a hit for Google. With Hangouts, the company had a perfectly solid and… Read More

  • GitHub brings its enterprise service to the cloud

    GitHub brings its enterprise service to the cloud

    GitHub is expanding its offering for large companies today. The service, which allows developers to more effectively collaborate and share their source code, already offered an enterprise version of its tools that large companies could host in their own data centers, AWS or Azure. Now, it is launching a new hosted service of GitHub that, just like the enterprise version, will cost $21 per… Read More

  • Google contributes its gRPC framework to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Google contributes its gRPC framework to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation

    Google today announced that it is donating gRPC, its high performance remote procedure call (RPC) framework, to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). The CNCF is already the open-source home of the Google-incubated Kubernetes container orchestration tool and similar projects that all aim bring software containers and microservices to the mainstream. GRPC is the sixth project in the… Read More

  • BMW says ‘nein’ to Android Auto

    BMW says ‘nein’ to Android Auto

    Like CES, the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona also now attracts its fair share of car makers. Ford was an early adopter a few years ago, and now others are joining the fray, too. I sat down with Dieter May, BMW’s senior vice president of Digital Services and Business Models (in an i3, of course). Read More

  • Google calls ‘time’ on the Pixel laptop

    Google calls ‘time’ on the Pixel laptop

    In a small meeting with journalists at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona today, Google’s senior vice president for hardware Rick Osterloh dropped a little bit of news: It looks like the Pixel laptop — Google’s premium Chromebook and the original product bearing the Pixel name — has hit the end of the line after just two iterations. Read More

  • Google at MWC: Daydream trees, cherry blossom, and nougat smoothies

    Every year, Google mixes up its presence at MWC a bit. After a few years of handing out smoothies and Android pins inside one of the halls here in Barcelona, Google made the move outside in recent years. That works great when it’s warm, but on a chilly day, it doesn’t exactly make for a pleasant experience. Here is what Google had to offer this year. Read More

  • For IBM’s CTO for Watson, not a lot of value in replicating the human mind in a computer

    For IBM’s CTO for Watson, not a lot of value in replicating the human mind in a computer

    “Everybody and their mother is out to create their own specialized voice-activated devices,” IBM fellow and CTO for its Watson project Rob High told me during an interview at MWC. IBM, of course, doesn’t offer a direct competitor to Siri, Google Assistant or Alexa, but the company hopes that developers will choose Watson, in all its various guises, to power their AI apps… Read More

  • We don’t need more Surface clones

    We don’t need more Surface clones

    When Microsoft launched the Surface line back in 2012, its combination of a tablet and keyboard cover (married with a smart kickstand), was innovative. With it, Microsoft surely hoped to kickstart a bit of innovation in what had become a rather stale market for Windows laptops and an almost non-existing market for Windows tablets. Instead of innovation, though, what we’re seeing now is… Read More

  • Open Garden makes its offline mesh networking tech available to third-party developers

    Open Garden makes its offline mesh networking tech available to third-party developers

    Open Garden, the company behind the FireChat offline messenger, is now the mesh networking tech behind its apps available for all developers. The company today announced the launch of its MeshKit SDK, which enables developers to easily integrate peer-to-peer connectivity into their apps, at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. The classic use case for this is chat apps, but it also works… Read More

  • Live from Samsung’s 2017 MWC press conference

    Live from Samsung’s 2017 MWC press conference

    A very happy Mobile World Congress to you and yours. The world’s largest smartphone show is still a couple of days from its official kick off, but there’s plenty of news to be had this weekend. Samsung will be taking the stage tonight in Barcelona to show off – well, not the Galaxy S8. That much we seemingly know for sure. The company announced a few weeks back that… Read More

  • Goodbye Withings, hello Nokia

    Goodbye Withings, hello Nokia

    Say goodbye to Withings. It’s been less than a year since Nokia completed its acquisition of the French smart devices maker and now it the Withings brand is about to be sunset. Withings’ devices and software will be rebranded under the Nokia banner later this summer. Withings’ existing line of smart watches, blood pressure monitors, thermometers and cameras will all come… Read More

  • OpenStack sets its sights on the next generation of private clouds

    OpenStack sets its sights on the next generation of private clouds

    Today, the OpenStack Foundation is launching the latest version of its platform that allows enterprises to run an AWS-like cloud computing platform in their data centers. Ocata, as the 15th release of OpenStack is called, arrives after only a four-month release cycle, which is a bit faster than its usual six-month cycle, which will resume after this release. The reason for this is a change… Read More

  • Email delivery service Mailgun spins out of Rackspace and raises $50M

    Email delivery service Mailgun spins out of Rackspace and raises $50M

    Mailgun, a Y Combinator-incubated email delivery service that was acquired by Rackspace in 2012, today announced that it is being spun out of Rackspace and that it has raised $50 million. Rackspace itself, of course, is going through a transition period now that it has become a private company again and given that email delivery isn’t one of its core services, the company decided to… Read More

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