medical

  • Review: 911 Medical ID Card features USB connection, fits in your wallet

    Short Version: A $40 digital ID card that fits in your wallet and holds all of your emergency medical information on a 1GB flip-out USB stick. Read More

  • Wireless EKG becoming a reality

    Everyone is familiar with the traditional EKG – you lie in the hospital bed, the leads connected to your body, and recording your heart rate and other vital statistics. But what if it was all wireless? What if you didn’t need to be in the hospital stuck in bed to be monitored? Read More

  • VIDEO: Vioguard self-sanitizing keyboard uses UV light to kill germs

    Short of just building a keyboard entirely of Purell, this is probably the next best thing. Priced at $899, you’ll probably never see the Vioguard self-sanitizing keyboard in your own home (unless you’re really a stickler for cleanliness) but it may find a home in various laboratories or other locations where proper disinfection is a top priority. Read More

  • Implant can help sleep apnea patients not frighten their partners

    Sleep apnea sufferers have long had to use the dreaded CPAP mask, but there may soon be an alternative. Medical researchers have discovered that a small implant, attached to the hyperglossal nerve, is capable of ending your sleep apnea and probably saving your marriage. Read More

  • It’s a bed! It’s a wheelchair! It’s a Panasonic!

    What will they think of next? Panasonic has developed a Transformer-like electronic bed that converts to a wheelchair while the person is in it. Read More

  • Forearm massager looks scary, probably works okay

    Believe it or not, many bloggers suffer from some sort of repetitive stress injury or even carpal tunnel syndrome. We’re human — mortal even. Cut us and we bleed red just like everyone else. Give us an atomic wedgie and we weep like an anxious child waiting for the bus on the first day of school in a new town. Run us over in a car and we — you get the idea: bloggers are weiners. Read More

  • Tricorder invented, now EMTs can take vital signs from 40ft away


    We’ve had some tricorder false alarms over the last couple years, but this one seems to be legit. A multi-institutional task force under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Science & Technology Directorate (take a breath) has created a hand-held tool which can read pulse, body temperature, and respiration from up to 40 feet away. It’s not quite at the level of… Read More

  • WinMo smartphones now work as medical tricorders with USB-based imagers

    Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have come up with a mobile medical imager that works on Windows Mobile phones over plain ol’ USB. Its applications are still limited due to the power and space requirements of other useful imaging techniques like MRI, but it’s a promising application for the tiny computers we all have in our pockets. Smartphones are capable of so… Read More

  • Flat keyboard for medical environments features faux-3D keys

    I’m surprised that it’s taken this long for one of these flat, easily washable keyboards to be clearly aimed at the medical establishment, not just in marketing but in design. The Medigenic Infection-control keyboard (catchy) is totally flat, and only appears to have a three-dimensional surface. This means it’s super easy to wipe down after some patient yaks all over it, or… Read More

  • CleanFUZE technology could save hospitals $150 million annually

    DiFusion Technologies, a medical device company based out of Austin, Texas, has developed a silver ion technology called CleanFUZE, designed to prevent infection after orthopedic procedures. Dr. Matthew Geck, the company’s founder, explained that “five out of 100 spine cases result in Surgical Site Infections (SSI) often leading to second surgeries that are extremely costly and… Read More

  • FrankenDoll made from living cells

    Researchers at the University of Tokyo, wanting to show off fabrication of living biological structures, have created a 5 millimeter tall doll made completely from living cells. Wow, that’s not creepy at all. Read More

  • Helper apps relieve aphasia sufferers

    A language pathologist from Sweden Ingrid Behrn has found that computerized writing aids can improve writing ability in people with aphasia, a condition that can arise after a stroke. This right after the anti-stutter iPhone app! Read More

  • My Prosthetic Lung

    Welsh company Haemair’s prosthetic lung just won UK Institution of Chemical Engineers’ Stopford Projects Award for Bioprocess Innovation. Normally, when a patient’s lungs don’t function, the patient is put on an ECMO system, an external machine that functions like a lung. The problem with these machines is that they are pretty bulky. Haemair has made a system that is… Read More

  • Magnetic field used as micro-tweezers


    German and American scientists at the Max Plank Institute have discovered a way to use a magnetic field to assemble parts on lab-on-a-chip devices. This system uses coils that induce magnetic fields on little ferrous particles causing them to arrange themselves into tiny cogs and diamond shapes. The researchers then use the little shapes to move liquids around the chip, a technique they… Read More

  • Get your own DNA portrait for $169

    If you’ve been trying to find the ultimate in personalization, look no further – how does an 8×10 portrait of your DNA sound? For $169, you can send a swab of the inside of your mouth to dna11.com and 4-6 weeks later, you’ll get a visual image of your one-of-a-kind DNA sequence. You can customize the image in one of 25 colors, too, and it comes with a certificate of… Read More

  • Meet Keiko, the newest (talking) robot for medical students

    Gifu University’s Graduate School of Medicine [JP] (located in central Japan) has developed a new “sick” robot, which is specifically geared towards medical students. Named Keiko (“practice” in Japanese), the robot is able to answer questions such as “How are you doing?”, i.e. by saying “I get tired easily lately”. The interactive… Read More

  • Yikes: cell phones causing cancer again

    Well, this latest news is less than thrilling, since I started using a cell phone at about 15 (it was a brick). Swedish researchers have found that children who started using cell phones before the age of 20 were five times more likely to develop cancer. The quote, please: “People who started mobile phone use before the age of 2 had more than five-fold increase in glioma”, a cancer… Read More

  • NEC launches Atom-powered touchscreen PCs

    Little Atom-equipped touchscreen PCs are dropping from more and more companies with NEC being the latest. These two models come in either 12- or 15-inch sizes and are obviously powered by Intel’s Atom processor clocking in at 1.6GHz. The units can be configured with either 512MB or 1GB of ram and comes with a sizable 80GB hard drive. Users have to deal with Vista Business Embedded via… Read More

  • New MRI technique works at near-cellular-level resolution


    Oh, those crazy biologists! Their MRI techniques are unstoppable. The MRI is often cited in popular media as being this magical cure-all or way to see “the exact location of love” or some such nonsense, when it is actually a limited tool with very specific applications and limitations — for example, interference from water and tissue makes it a slightly imprecise affair. Read More

  • Hospital software allows docs to view complex medical data anywhere


    Say you get in a car accident and they need to do an MRI to determine if there’s damage to this or that in your brain. That MRI generates a ton of data, and until recently the only way you could view that data was on a specialized workstation meant just for that purpose. FiatLux, a Microsoft offshoot with modest funding, has created a way to take advantage of the extremely powerful GPUs… Read More