hacks

  • Google Shuts Down Map Maker Following Hacks

    Google Shuts Down Map Maker Following Hacks

    After a series of spam attacks and other obscene edits, Google has temporarily taken its crowdsourced map editing tool Map Maker offline. The online tool has, for years, allowed those in countries without detailed maps to be able to add various details and points of interest to Google Maps, like new roads or parks, for example. Read More

  • Dashlane’s “Inbox Scan” Tool Uncovers The Passwords You’ve Saved In Your Email

    Dashlane’s “Inbox Scan” Tool Uncovers The Passwords You’ve Saved In Your Email

    Even if you create and use secure passwords with your various online sites, there are still a number of ways they can leak out. One area that’s often overlooked, according to password manager and digital wallet provider Dashlane, is email. That is, people often share their login credentials and plain-text passwords along with other sensitive data via email messages. That means if… Read More

  • The Cloud Could Be Your Best Security Bet

    The Cloud Could Be Your Best Security Bet

    In fact, if a cloud service has proper controls, it could be safer than running your own datacenter. Amazon, Google, Salesforce and Box to a company have much more at stake when it comes to security. A breach could prove devastating to their businesses. That could be why it’s hard to come up with a major security snafu involving a cloud provider. Other than the Jennifer Lawrence… Read More

  • Voltera, The Electronics Printer, Launches To Much Fanfare

    Voltera, The Electronics Printer, Launches To Much Fanfare

    One of our absolute favorites from the Hardware Battlefield just launched on Kickstarter and they are, if you’ll excuse the cliché, crushing it. The company appeared on our stage at CES 2015 and showed of an early working prototype. Now, however, they’re ready to take orders and start shipping. The printer is essentially a PCB maker. You put in a board, upload a circuit diagram… Read More

  • The Freedom Clip Breaks Coffee Pod DRM Because Java Wants To Be Free, Man

    The Freedom Clip Breaks Coffee Pod DRM Because Java Wants To Be Free, Man

    The latest Keurig K-Cup machines have a dirty secret: built into the little ground coffee pods that so many know and love is a nefarious form of DRM. A special ink found only on real cups (and damaged by use) ensures that you can only use “real” K-Cups, thereby preventing you from making your own pirate cups. But freedom’s just another word for sticking it to the man, and… Read More

  • The Digital Chord Chart Is A DIY Way To Learn The Guitar

    The Digital Chord Chart Is A DIY Way To Learn The Guitar

    It is my understanding, and correct me if I’m off base here, that you’re into piña coladas and getting caught in the rain. Furthermore, you’re not into yoga and, I suspect this is unrelated but let’s not quibble, you have half a brain. And if you like making 3D-printed guitar necks at midnight on your home workbench, then you should probably take a look at this… Read More

  • Lizard Squad’s Plaintext Customer List Leaked As Another Member Is Arrested

    Lizard Squad’s Plaintext Customer List Leaked As Another Member Is Arrested

    The Lizard Squad, the group of hackers credited with taking down Xbox Live and PSN over the holiday, have been compromised and much of their data leaked. Brian Krebs received a listing of the Lizard Squad’s LizardStresser customer database and noted that the group made about $11,000 in bitcoin serving up denial-of-service on demand. At the same time police arrested an alleged member of… Read More

  • The Lizard Squad’s “Lizard Stresser” Service Runs On Hacked Routers

    The Lizard Squad’s “Lizard Stresser” Service Runs On Hacked Routers

    Security expert Brian Krebs has analyzed the Lizard Stresser, an attack tool created by the so-called Lizard Squad hacker collective and touted as a test for webmins who needed to see what happens to their services under duress. His discovery? The network of attack computers actually consists of insecure and compromised home routers. This is the network used to take down the Playstation… Read More

  • High Tech Or Hangover? Watch Quake On An Oscilloscope

    High Tech Or Hangover? Watch Quake On An Oscilloscope

    Head spinning? Stomach gurgling? Did you just drink a Bloody Mary just to find some respite from your pounding gulliver? Why not take a look at Pekka Väänänen’s project, an attempt to play Quake on a Hitachi V-422 oscilloscope. Why? Because if it can’t run Quake it’s not a true piece of technological hardware, that’s why. But it’s pretty hard. To get the machine… Read More

  • Build Your Own DIY Raspberry Pi Minecraft Server

    Build Your Own DIY Raspberry Pi Minecraft Server

    As we approach the doldrums of winter what could be more cheerful than hours of incessant Minecrafting with you and your loved ones? While you can easily run a server on any computer (the program requires a server app to run in conjunction with a client “game” app), why not use your newly acquired Raspberry Pi? I don’t know! This Instructable essentially tells you how to make… Read More

  • Whose Hack Is It Anyway?

    Whose Hack Is It Anyway?

    It’s pretty clear that the Sony Pictures hack was neither an act of war or particularly belligerent. As Marc Rogers of CloudFlare and DEF CON notes, finding out who performed a hack, even one as ham-handed as this one, is difficult. Hackers with any sense use proxies and attack soft targets. But once they’ve attacked and dumped their goods, it becomes nearly impossible to follow… Read More

  • Anonymous Allegedly Attacking Swedish Servers For Pirate Bay Shutdown

    Anonymous Allegedly Attacking Swedish Servers For Pirate Bay Shutdown

    Anonymous is attacking Swedish government servers, including police services, in retaliation for the shutdown of the The Pirate Bay, a bit torrent aggregator. The attacks, mostly denial-of-service efforts, have been most recently aimed at the Swedish police. The main site, polisen.se, is currently live. Target: http://t.co/7n6zorlkFH IP… Read More

  • The Founder’s Guide To Email Security

    The Founder’s Guide To Email Security

    With the horror of the Sony Pictures breach unfolding in slow motion before us, we are reminded that operational security – OpSec – is absolutely key at any company. Whether or not you traffic in high-value data, the expectation that your servers are secure enough and that your data is worthless is foolhardy. You will be compromised and it will hurt. Read More

  • The Don’t-Leave-Home-Without-It Machine Ensures You Do As It Says

    The Don’t-Leave-Home-Without-It Machine Ensures You Do As It Says

    In one of the greatest examples of LittleBits engineering I’ve seen in a while, maker Sean Ragan made a little box that reminds you to take objects when you leave the house. You can place anything inside it – glasses, a wallet, your pills, the skull of a marmot – and it will ring a bell if you pass by it without taking the item out. Nowadays we’ve got more stuff… Read More

  • Chinese Programmer Sticks Windows 95 On An iPhone 6 Plus

    Chinese Programmer Sticks Windows 95 On An iPhone 6 Plus

    Today in “putting stuff onto things on which they don’t belong,” we present a user, xyq058775, and his exciting admission that he installed Windows 95 on a brand new iPhone. He used a tool called iDos, an open source DOSBox-like app to install the OS. He found that most of it worked fine but he was unable to upgrade to Windows XP. And we can assume he was also able to… Read More

  • You Can Play Tetris On This Steampunk Bracelet

    You Can Play Tetris On This Steampunk Bracelet

    Keven Bates, the creator of the Arduboy programmable business card, has taken his upcoming project and stuffed it into the coolest bracelet you’ll see all week. The wearable, made of copper and exposed circuitry (do not get it wet, naturally) can play Tetris on a tiny LCD screen. You move the blocks by tapping the sides of the bracelet and it scrolls the falling parts across multiple… Read More

  • TechCrunch Disrupt Hackathon Developers Learn To Simplify Under Pressure

    TechCrunch Disrupt Hackathon Developers Learn To Simplify Under Pressure

    Under the pressure that is the TechCrunch Disrupt Hackathon, one team found itself stuck. The product was too complex to complete on time. The team members were tired and depressed and ready to give up until one member of the team, software engineer Alessandro Diogo Bruckheimer came up with an idea to simplify their goal and the app Should I Ride My Bike? was born. Read More

  • Plan B Uses Old Printer Parts To Create Detailed 3D Models

    Plan B Uses Old Printer Parts To Create Detailed 3D Models

    If you’re bored this weekend, go ahead and tear apart your old inkjet printer and grab a few pieces of aluminum. Then head over to Yvo de Haas’ website and get cracking. His new project, called Plan B, is an open source 3D printer that lets you print solid plastic objects by binding a thin layer of plastic powder with an old printer head. How does it work? Well the Plan B is a… Read More

  • Make Your Own Lonely Electric Zoo Of One Using Wavepot

    Make Your Own Lonely Electric Zoo Of One Using Wavepot

    Knob-twiddlers take note: Wavepot is a cool new way to program some hot EDM beats in the privacy of your bedroom/techno cave. Designed to be a live, programmable digital audio workstation (at this point it’s more of a digital signal processor), the website lets you program music and sound the way you’d program a web page or simple app. You set up the parameters, add various… Read More

  • Booting A PDP-11

    Booting A PDP-11

    As we move swiftly into an era of ubiquitous computing, Internets of Things, and mind-machine connections via wetware, it’s important to step back and take a look at where we’ve been. That’s why this How-To by Trammell Hudson is so cool. It shows how to boot a PDP-11 so you can play Adventure on a monochrome screen and reminds us that old computer were as finicky as Model… Read More

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