Flash

  • SublimeVideo’s Cloud-Based HTML5 Player Goes Freemium

    SublimeVideo’s Cloud-Based HTML5 Player Goes Freemium

    Jilion, the makers of the cloud-based HTML5 video player SublimeVideo, are today making the product more accessible through the introduction of a freemium offering. When the service launched earlier this spring, commercial plans were available, starting at the relatively affordable rate of under $10 per month. But when it comes to user adoption, nothing beats “free.” Read More

  • Ice Cream Sandwich Will Get Flash Support By The End Of The Year

    Ice Cream Sandwich Will Get Flash Support By The End Of The Year

    It seemed, for a time, that the book on mobile Flash as we knew it was closed. Adobe announced just a few weeks ago that development for mobile Flash would cease, and their efforts and resources would soon be focused elsewhere. As it turns out, Adobe has one last project up their sleeves before they bid mobile Flash adieu: an update that includes support for Ice Cream Sandwich. Read More

  • Gillmor Gang on Amazon's Kindle Fire

    Gillmor Gang 11.15.11 (TCTV)

    The Gillmor Gang — Robert Scoble, John Taschek, Kevin Marks, and Steve Gillmor — took advantage of the early rays of the new rising sun to record. It must have been fun to watch the caffeine kick in, but the show was half over before I arrived. I’d been up late mourning the death of Flash, which finally received an auto-update from reality it couldn’t refuse. Next for… Read More

  • Why Mobile Flash Died: An Adobe Employee Speaks Out

    Why Mobile Flash Died: An Adobe Employee Speaks Out

    Adobe’s mobile Flash efforts have recently gone the way of the western black rhino, and Principal Product Manager Mike Chambers isn’t too pleased with how the Adobe chose to broke the news. In fact, he feels so strongly about it that he’s offered up his own clarifications on the matter. “Our goal was to be very clear about WHAT we were doing, but in doing so, we… Read More

  • Why Adobe Failed and Where Startups Can Swoop In

    Why Adobe Failed and Where Startups Can Swoop In

    Adobe has discontinued development of Flash-Player plugin for mobile browsers. This is a very important moment in the history of the mobile internet. Since 1997, Flash Player has been an important part of the web. From flash games, to streaming video, to sound, and sockets, many of the most important and central components of the online web experience have leveraged Flash-Player… Read More

  • A Humbled Adobe Sees Beyond The Browser

    A Humbled Adobe Sees Beyond The Browser

    I can’t help chortling a little in Schadenfreude at Adobe’s expected announcement that it is abandoning Flash for mobile devices. For most of the past two years, the anti-iPad contingent has cited flash incompatibility as the primary reason they weren’t going to give Apple their money yet the devices they did back – the Xoom, the Notion Ink Adam, the Playbook, and the… Read More

  • Steve’s Last Laugh: Adobe Killing Off Flash For Mobile Devices

    Steve’s Last Laugh: Adobe Killing Off Flash For Mobile Devices

    The year was 2008. I was at an event focused on mobile, sitting in on a roundtable discussion with several folks from key companies in the industry. One gentleman was from Adobe. The iPhone had launched the previous year, famously without any support for Flash. A lot of folks were up in arms about this — including several at this table. The guy from Adobe assured everyone: mobile Flash… Read More

  • Adobe Gives Up On Apple, Works Around iOS’ Flash Video Limitations

    Adobe Gives Up On Apple, Works Around iOS’ Flash Video Limitations

    Ardent iOS supporters have been clamoring for true Flash support for years, and with the announcement of their new version of Flash Media Server, Adobe completely fails to deliver. Instead, they’ve managed to update their media server with a way to get streaming Flash video running on Apple’s myriad iOS devices. Read More

  • Google Abandons “Maps API For Flash”

    Google Abandons “Maps API For Flash”

    In more news of Flash’s impending decline, Google is announcing that it’s “deprecating” the Google Maps API (application programming interface) for Flash. This API previously allowed developers to add Google Maps functionality within their Flash-based applications. However, as of today, use of the API is limited, says Google, with only a small number of applications… Read More

  • HTML5 or Flash? With Yokto’s New Video Player, You Don’t Have To Choose

    HTML5 or Flash? With Yokto’s New Video Player, You Don’t Have To Choose

    Yokto is a newly launched video platform which offers an embeddable player that intelligently switches between a Flash-based interface or HTML5, depending on the device being used to view the content. This idea on its own is not original, of course. Similar solutions from companies like Brightcove, Ooyala, Kaltura¬†and SublimeVideo, for example, offer much of the same thing. But where Yokto… Read More

  • Qualcomm, Adobe Optimize Flash For Snapdragon-Powered Android Phones

    Adobe Flash is to the smartphone as an unwanted cousin is to your wedding: necessary, yet painstaking. Apple CEO Steve Jobs seems to hate the software, neglecting to support it on all four models of the iPhone. Google’s done a better job of incorporating Flash support into the Android operating system, but still, most of the time Flash ends up being a battery killer, a security risk, not… Read More

  • Flash in the Pan

    The news from NBC/Universal/Comcast is that the cable giant has finally made deals with both ABC and Fox to carry selected shows on their on-demand service. This is big news for the iPad set, because all four major broadcast networks are now available in a single service, on the iPad, without Flash. Across town we hear talk of hardware acceleration linking up with Android to make Flash… Read More

  • Google Chrome Can Now Clean Up Flash's Cookie Mess

    Google Chrome Can Now Clean Up Flash's Cookie Mess

    I still don’t particularly like the fact that Google decided to bundle Adobe Flash with their Chrome web browser about a year ago. Apple preference aside, the last thing I want is the buggy, often insecure, and performance killing plug-in shoved in my face. More importantly, I think it’s a maneuver that will only serve to slow the transition to HTML5. But Google has their reasons. Read More

  • Adobe's Wallaby Can't Jump Very High

    Earlier today, Adobe Labs released Wallaby, a way to convert simple Flash games and animations into HTML so that it is readable on “devices that do not support the Flash runtimes.” Those would be iPhones and iPads. In other words, Wallaby is Adobe’s way of bowing down to HTML5 and, by extension, to Steve Jobs who has always insisted that there is no need for Flash because… Read More

  • When Will Apple Cave And Accept Flash? Maybe When It Doesn't Suck

    I read an interesting article this morning that suggested Apple would change its mind and put Adobe’s Flash technology on its iOS devices within a year. I don’t think that’s going to happen. In an open letter to users, Apple CEO Steve Jobs gave several reasons why he didn’t want Flash on the iPad, iPhone or iPod touch. They are: Flash isn’t open; the full web… Read More

  • Read The Fine Print: No Motorola Xoom Flash Support Until 'Spring 2011'

    Bad news for those of you who were looking forward to the release of the Motorola Xoom, the world’s first Honeycomb-based tablet. It seems that the tablet will not ship with Adobe Flash at launch, and that you’ll have to wait to sometime this spring to see proper Flash support. That’s a shame. Read More

  • AMD Hardware Acceleration Comes To Flash Player 10.2

    Adobe released version 10.2 of its Flash Player yesterday, but this bit of news may have flown under the radar. It seems that Adobe worked with AMD in order to bring hardware acceleration to Flash video—provided you’re using recent AMD hardware, of course. What could be better than hardware accelerated YouTube videos? Read More

  • Google Clarifies Their H.264 Stance, Hands Keys Of Web Video's Future Back To Flash

    Google Clarifies Their H.264 Stance, Hands Keys Of Web Video's Future Back To Flash

    Earlier this week, Google wrote a very short post on their relatively small Chromium blog to announce a big change: they were dropping support for the H.264 codec in Chrome. While they may have tried to whisper it, the post resulted in a shitstorm that reached high into the heavens. It seems as if just about everyone weighed in on the decision (including us, twice). As a result of the… Read More

  • So Google, You'll Be Dropping Support For Flash Next, Right?

    So Google, You'll Be Dropping Support For Flash Next, Right?

    Do you smell that? Just wait a second. You will. Though H.264 plays an important role in video, as our goal is to enable open innovation, support for the codec will be removed and our resources directed towards completely open codec technologies. The bolding is mine, but that’s Google’s actual statement as to why they’re dropping support for the H.264 video codec from the… Read More

  • The Gloves Are Off: Google Chrome Browser Will Drop Support For H.264 Video Codec

    In the world of online video, there is a battle brewing over the next dominant standard for online video, especially on HTML5 Web pages. Today, Google took the gloves off and declared that it will soon stop supporting the H.264 video codec in its Chrome browser. Instead, it will only support open-source technologies such as its own WebM initiative (with its VP8 codec) and the open-source… Read More