chips

  • Coming Soon: Smartphones With 16MP Cameras

    If you look at the batches of new cell phones Japan’s leading mobile carriers have been presenting in recent months, you’ll notice the high-quality cameras some of the models have. And now major Japanese chip maker Renesas (which merged with NEC last year) is even promising [JP] 16MP cameras in future handsets. Read More

  • Toshiba To Outsource LSI Chip Production To Samsung

    Toshiba seems to be determined to completely overhaul its semiconductor segment. Yesterday, it was reported that Sony will buy back a semiconductor plant it sold to Toshiba two years ago for $600 million. And today, Toshiba itself said it is ready for a second step: the company is in talks with Samsung to farm out the production of LSI chips to its Korean rival. Read More

  • Apple looking into building its own chips

    Not content at owning 100% of the world’s brand awareness, Apple is looking into building its own chipset and has even hired a team to work on “multifunction” mobile chips. In the cellphone world, a chip is a chip. Most of them are ARM-based but there are a few outliers. Most importantly, however, each has a similar power profile. Therefore, by controlling the entire chip… Read More

  • Apple's loss of iPod chief points to interesting new direction

    As we well know, Tony Fadell, the former exec in charge of Apple’s iPod division, has stepped down for personal reasons and Apple has hired Mark Papermaster, the PowerPC chip guru in IBM’s hardware business. We’ve been discussing the move and there are a few reasons for choosing someone from IBM to lead what is, in reality, an entertainment division. First, iPods are now… Read More

  • NEC's new technology makes gigahertz wireless chips smaller

    NEC Electronics today announced in Japan [JP] they managed to develop a technology which could lead to chips used for wireless applications that are 10% smaller than existing products. NEC is planning to use the new chips for indoor wireless communication under gigahertz-band frequencies and miliwave and UWB protocols. The company coats their chips with a ferrite layer that boosts the… Read More

  • IBM and AMD: "First to 22nm!" Intel: "Big whoop"

    Well! IBM and AMD are certainly proud of themselves today! They’ve been working on a 22nm SRAM cell, two generations ahead of the current 45nm process. The devices developed and manufactured by AMD, Freescale, IBM STMicroelectronics, Toshiba and the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) were built in a traditional six-transistor design on a 300 mm wafer and had a memory… Read More

  • The future of Moore's law: IBM's chief technologist weighs in

    Trouble ahead, captain! Before ten years is out, our pattern of reducing the size of semiconductors (for example, the move to 45nm from 65nm with Penryn) every two years or so is going to hit a brick wall. In a few more shrinks, we’ll be approaching 10nm, at which point quantum mechanics begin to take over and reality gets all wobbly. So what’s next? IBM’s chief technologist… Read More

  • Interesting: 3D chips with microscopic water cooling


    Chips these days are pretty much flat. And I’m not talking about tortilla chips. They call those silicon things wafers for a reason: all those little gates and channels are lying flat in a single layer. Chipmakers know that you can stack chips on top of each other and multiply your computing power due to the decreased distance the signal has to travel (I’m kind of at the edge of… Read More

  • Killing RFID tags


    Aim well, my friend Instructables has a detailed discussion on how to disable an RFID tag in a passport or other radio-enabled item. The bottom line? Smash the bugger with a hammer. -The last (and most covert) method for destroying a RFID tag is to hit it with a hammer. Just pick up any ordinary hammer and give the chip a few swift hard whacks. This will destroy the chip, and leave no… Read More

  • AMD drops triple-core procs as rumored

    AMD today finally updated its Phenom chips from dual-core to triple-core, as has been rumored for weeks. The new chips have clock speeds between 2.1GHz and 2.4, 1.5MB front-side cache, and AMD’s HyperTransport at 3600Mhz. Pricing starts at around $145 in large orders. The 3-core chips are unusual and bridge the gap between current 2-core chips and the more expensive 4-core chips. Read More