Here’s What The Amazon Fire Phone’s Crazy 3D Head Tracking Looks Like

0/9 Replay Gallery More Galleries
SEE SLIDESHOW

Here’s What The Amazon Fire Phone’s Crazy 3D Head Tracking Looks Like

This morning — as expected — Amazon announced their very first smartphone. While many of its features can be found on other devices, it’s got at least one trick that’s particularly unique: a complex camera system that tracks the position of your head and shifts the perspective of what’s on screen accordingly.

The end result? Trippy, glasses-free 3D. Here’s what it looks like in motion.

1/9

Amazon Debuts The Fire Phone

This morning — as expected — Amazon announced their very first smartphone. While many of its features can be found on other devices, it’s got at least one trick that’s particularly unique: a complex camera system that tracks the position of your head and shifts the perspective of what’s on screen accordingly.

The end result? Trippy, glasses-free 3D. Here’s what it looks like in motion.

2/9

The more drastic your head/wrist movements, the more the on-screen perspective will shift.

It’s easy to imagine this being used in games (like a puzzler that requires you to inspect an object for hidden bits).

3/9

It works on Maps, too!

Want to look behind that building? Now you can look behind that building.

4/9

Hidden Menus

Amazon is also experimenting with using head tracking for UI navigation. Here, for example, we see someone giving the phone a quick twist to reveal a menu, without ever touching the screen.

Advertisement
5/9

More hidden menus!

Because nothing says “intuitive” like hidden menus that require the user to flick their wrist.

6/9

Auto Scrolling

Love reading, but hate having to do all that tiring moving your finger slightly to turn the page? The Fire’s built-in Kindle app can combine the data from its front-facing cameras with data from the accelerometer for infinite page scrolling.

7/9

It works on web pages, too!

Now you can expend even less energy while screwing around on the Internet.

8/9

The video that started it all

Here’s the video that is said to have inspired Amazon’s interest in building such a device.

Back in 2007, then-CMU student Johnny Lee hacked together his own crazy, on-the-fly perspective shifting. Using a wii remote and two infrared LEDs strapped to his head, he was able to simulate the illusion of depth/perspective on his TV.

Advertisement
9/9

The future? Probably not.

So what do you think: is this the future of smartphone UI navigation? A silly gimmick? Something in between?

BACK TO
TOP