Column

 

  • Why More Companies Should Submit To Peer Review

    Why More Companies Should Submit To Peer Review

    Academia is governed by a process called “peer review,” which ensures research is validated and reasoning is sound. More simply – it weeds out the real insights from the fluff. Meanwhile, most corporate data (think surveys, white papers), is made public after only an internal, inherently biased review. With recent backlash toward Facebook’s emotions experiment… Read More

  • As Samsung Falters, An Opening For Startups

    As Samsung Falters, An Opening For Startups

    In the smash-hit movie Roaring Currents, Korea’s naval hero Admiral Yi-Sun Sin defends Korea from an invading Japanese imperial navy, single-handedly using his ship to hold off their advance in a treacherous current that today is considered one of the great naval battles of all time. Read More

  • Corporate Accelerators Are An Oxymoron

    Corporate Accelerators Are An Oxymoron

    Building a corporate accelerator is certainly in vogue these days. Wells Fargo launched a new accelerator program last week targeting financial services startups and has already unveiled its first class of three participants. The program follows the general recipe these days for corporate accelerators, providing some cash, mentoring, and networking to young startups interested in the industry. Read More

  • E-Businesses In Africa Have A Responsibility To Help Alleviate Internet Poverty

    E-Businesses In Africa Have A Responsibility To Help Alleviate Internet Poverty

    In Soshanguve, a township just north of Pretoria in South Africa, there was a small kiosk that sold fruit, cigarettes and snacks to passersby. The owner of the kiosk had recently installed Wi-Fi and, soon after, placed tables and chairs out front. And then her customers soon began to linger. They bought more items; they socialized. Her business became a hub, transforming from a corrugated tin to… Read More

  • A Look Back At Yahoo’s Flickr Acquisition For Lessons Today

    A Look Back At Yahoo’s Flickr Acquisition For Lessons Today

    When Yahoo made an offer to buy photo-sharing startup Flickr in early 2005, Stewart Butterfield and his team had a tough decision to make. There were many reasons for Flickr, founded by Butterfield and Caterina Fake, to sell, but also many to hold on and go for a larger exit. Flickr’s acquisition was one of the first significant consumer Internet acquisitions after the dot-com crash… Read More

  • Clean CRM Data Starts With A Great Mobile Experience

    Clean CRM Data Starts With A Great Mobile Experience

    There is no doubt that Salesforce is one of the most widely used customer relationship management systems. However, the shift to BYOD is changing the game for sales and marketing, and we need an immediate infusion of technology in CRM. Read More

  • Why Everyone Is Obsessed With E-Mail Newsletters Right Now

    Why Everyone Is Obsessed With E-Mail Newsletters Right Now

    E-mail newsletters are so hot right now. Some of the best known are by Ann Friedman, Alexis Madrigal, Dan Hon and Rusty Foster. There’s a web ring for e-mail newsletters now, but really the best newsletters are secret. The authors encourage readers to share the subscribe link with other people who might be interested, but request that no one share the subscribe link on social media or… Read More

  • Why Are PC Sales Up And Tablet Sales Down?

    Why Are PC Sales Up And Tablet Sales Down?

    When iPads first came out, they were hailed as the undoing of the PC. Finally, a cheap and reliable computing device for the average user instead of the complicated, quirky PC. After a few years of strong growth for iOS and Android tablets and a corresponding decrease in PC sales, the inverse is suddenly true: PC sales are up and tablet sales are “crashing”. What happened? Read More

  • HBO’s “Silicon Valley”: Behind The Squirm

    HBO’s “Silicon Valley”: Behind The Squirm

    HBO’s “Silicon Valley” is more than your average breakout series that had audiences praying for a second season even as the credits on the pilot began to roll. The show has clearly hit a cultural nerve, both inside and outside the tech community. I talk with series co-executive producer and writer Clay Tarver on how — and why — the new hit show gets it right. Read More

  • Women In Tech: It’s Not Just A Pipeline Problem

    Women In Tech: It’s Not Just A Pipeline Problem

    Why are there so embarrassingly few women in the tech industry? Repeat after me, robotically, defensively: “It’s a pipeline problem!” So says David Cohen of TechStars, echoing many others, e.g. Paul Graham and CNN. But come on, folks. We’re kidding ourselves if we pretend that’s the only obstacle here. The pipeline problem is very real; but so is the trapdoor problem. Read More

  • Access To User Data: If Microsoft Wins, Do Startups And Innovators Lose?

    Access To User Data: If Microsoft Wins, Do Startups And Innovators Lose?

    With user trust at an all-time low, keeping the FBI’s hands off foreign users’ data seems like good business sense for US companies. Microsoft says it’s “fighting the feds over your email, but it also happens to be fighting to support the Microsoft business model. If your business isn’t like Microsoft (and if you’re a tech company that’s less than 10… Read More

  • Will Developer Tools Startups Ever Find Investors?

    Will Developer Tools Startups Ever Find Investors?

    Venture capital is an industry in which the exceptions are often more important than the rules. For many years, investors believed in a golden rule that software was the key to minting returns, leaving hardware as one of the most underinvested areas of venture. Then things changed as new technologies like 3D printing allowed hardware startups to accelerate their product design, and several… Read More

  • Unscaling The Trillion-Dollar Power Industry

    Unscaling The Trillion-Dollar Power Industry

    Throughout the history of the power industry, the answer to all of our problems has been to “get bigger”. Due to economies of scale, utilities have concentrated on building larger and larger power plants to increase efficiency and improve profitability. That’s why we still receive the vast majority of our power the way we have for decades — from massive plants based… Read More

  • Achieving Anonymity Online Remains Difficult Despite Evolving Privacy Tools

    Achieving Anonymity Online Remains Difficult Despite Evolving Privacy Tools

    Some things are best kept secret. But when it comes to your online activities, can you ever truly conceal your identity? A variety of tools and best practices can help you achieve some level of privacy when surfing the web, but it is nearly impossible to ensure that your online activities remain completely anonymous. Read More

  • E-Commerce May Not Be The Growth Story Many Believe It To Be

    E-Commerce May Not Be The Growth Story Many Believe It To Be

    The recent surge of interest linking e-commerce to disruption is nothing short of phenomenal. A trend manifested by the rise of Amazon, initially focused on the book industry, has scaled across all sectors of retail. While some believe that 2014 is the year that everything changed and disruption finally arrived on the traditional retailer’s doorsteps, we believe that by analyzing the… Read More

  • Startup Marketing And How Emotion Drives Customer Action

    Startup Marketing And How Emotion Drives Customer Action

    Put down the calculator and ignore the data for a second. Contrary to popular belief, startup marketing is not all about quantitative metrics and growth hacking. It’s time to start mapping out what creates a connection between you and your customer. Specifically, I am talking about driving customer actions by leveraging human emotion through the art of storytelling. Read More

  • A Second Act For The Internet Of Things

    A Second Act For The Internet Of Things

    For the last few years there has been a lot of talk in the venture capital industry about automating the home and leveraging Internet-enabled devices for various functions in manufacturing and the traditional workplace. The first wave of this was the use of the smartphone as a remote control, like the Nest’s ability to allow consumers to control their thermostat using their smartphone. Read More

  • Cloud Storage Is Eating The World Alive

    Cloud Storage Is Eating The World Alive

    “Dead man walking.” That is what many in the storage industry are calling IBM’s storage hardware business. But its storage competitors, including EMC or HP, should not be so quick to wave that flag, as they may follow suit before too long. We are already seeing similar trending signs of their downfall. Read More

  • Investment Banking 2.0 Says “Hello World!?”

    Investment Banking 2.0 Says “Hello World!?”

    David Gelles wrote in the New York Times this weekend about how large tech corporations have been conducting more M&A deals with less input from traditional investment banks. Because of my company’s insight into buy and sell-side M&A interest, I wanted to provide some additional insight into how we see the M&A world changing. Read More

  • Mobile’s “One Game Wonder” Problem

    Mobile’s “One Game Wonder” Problem

    Mobile gaming is a massive success, but it’s notable how many big game makers struggle to convert their successes into longer term franchises or other offerings. This week’s King news is just another example. Perhaps with stronger community features, however, that could change. Read More