Tadhg Kelly

Tadhg Kelly

Tadhg is a senior video game designer, producer and creative director.

Tadhg has held roles at various video game development, technology and publishing companies. Since the early 90s, Tadhg has worked on all sorts of game projects, from boardgames and live action roleplaying games through to multi-million dollar PC projects. He has served as lead designer, senior producer and a number of other roles at several companies including BSkyB, Lionhead and Climax.

Tadhg is also a published games industry commentator, having been featured in several key industry publications. He is also a noted blogger.

Tadhg spends his time working with Simple Lifeforms defining our vision for social game-play, designing our signature social games and consulting for various video game development companies on their game development and design strategies.

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Latest from Tadhg Kelly

  • What Games Are: The Nintendo Difference Still Exists

    What Games Are: The Nintendo Difference Still Exists

    There are three kinds of articles that regularly get written about Nintendo. The first article says Nintendo’s hardware business is doomed. The second laments the state of the company’s games. The third article, including this one, says that only a fool bets against Nintendo. Nintendo, it says, is different. Because it is. Read More

  • What Games Are: The Unfulfilled Promise Of Videogames

    What Games Are: The Unfulfilled Promise Of Videogames

    Growing up in the age of computers and technology we can almost taste the promise of videogames. We don’t just like to play videogames, we like to imagine what they might be and how they might influence society. We like to think of the 21st century as the “ludic” century. We’re all in agreement that games are on the rise. Yet, frustratingly, we sense that they have stalled. Read More

  • What Games Are: Steam’s Big Bet

    What Games Are: Steam’s Big Bet

    With new consoles and microconsoles starting to pop into existence, this week Valve finally revealed its answer: SteamOS. Steam Machines. Steam Controllers. Boom. Its ambitions are not to launch a console but a whole solution for home gaming entertainment. In a sense it has to. Read More

  • What Games Are: The Perplexing OUYA Reflex

    What Games Are: The Perplexing OUYA Reflex

    With the extended overreaction to the Free The Games fund from the development community, the question to be asked is why do OUYA and the other microconsoles consistently draw a lot of negativity from the gaming community? Is it a sense of threat? Of missed expectations? Is it something else? Some thoughts on why, and what the solution to overcoming skepticism might be. Read More

  • What Games Are: The Marketing Squeeze

    What Games Are: The Marketing Squeeze

    In case you didn’t know, marketing games on mobile has become a big of a nightmare. In this article I talk about how this is part of a wider trend, a squeezing phase affecting many game makers in the middle. Is there any hope for them? Read More

  • What Games Are: The March Of The Muggles

    What Games Are: The March Of The Muggles

    It’s easy to consign tablet and mobile gaming to the lamestream and feel that there’s a detente between that and the more core gaming platforms. However this is both shortsighted and naive. There’s a deep reason why users are moving over to simpler platforms, one that can’t be ignored. For game developers, for everyone really, learning how to engage with a more… Read More

  • What Games Are: Something’s Adrift With Oculus Rift

    What Games Are: Something’s Adrift With Oculus Rift

    Take a step back from what Rift does and consider where it does it. What do you see? A hulking PC at a desk powering it and its games. Oculus Rift’s problem is essentially that it’s a peripheral for a device category which is ever-so-slowly passing into the West. The business case doesn’t make sense. Read More

  • What Games Are: The Win Imperative

    What Games Are: The Win Imperative

    Many readers will be familiar with the idea that games and reward go together. Yet reward by itself isn’t rewarding. The reason is that it’s not the reward that’s interesting, but rather what it signifies: satisfaction of a job well done, a stroke of luck, a problem solved, a situation overcome, an enemy defeated. In short, it’s about winning. All games are played to win. Read More

  • What Games Are: Self-Publishing On Console Will Not Create The Next SuperCell. But Microconsoles Might.

    What Games Are: Self-Publishing On Console Will Not Create The Next SuperCell. But Microconsoles Might.

    It’s interesting to watch Microsoft pivot to liberalize their platform and allow self-publishing for indies, but that doesn’t mean Xbox will suddenly be the home of the next SuperCell. There’s still too much legacy in how console makers think to let that happen. Microconsoles, on the other hand, may well offer that possibility. Read More

  • What Games Are: Apple Needs To Make An iJoypad

    What Games Are: Apple Needs To Make An iJoypad

    The prospect of iPhones supporting game controllers is cool. But why is Apple giving away the opportunity to seize the initiative and make a new cool new add-on of its own? It feels like a big mistake, one symptomatic of a risk-averse sentiment growing around the company. For that and many other reasons, Apple should lead and make an iJoypad rather than wait for others. Read More

  • What Games Are: The Culture Gap In Mobile Games

    What Games Are: The Culture Gap In Mobile Games

    While other formats gain huge swathes of coverage in the gaming press, the talk in mobile is almost always just about process, business models and money. The absence of a cultural layer is notable, and a potential gap is emerging for someone to become a critical influencer in that market. What might that look like? Read More

  • What Games Are: The Ludophile Mindset

    What Games Are: The Ludophile Mindset

    Like the audiophile who spends serious money on her music, the ludophile spends aplenty on games and consoles. Both want perfection. The question for the games industry, however, is whether perfection is really the goal any more. To chase that market is very expensive, and although gamers may not like to hear it, good-enough seems like a better goal industry-wise in the long run. Read More

  • What Games Are: Reinventing The Games Console Half Way Won’t Work

    What Games Are: Reinventing The Games Console Half Way Won’t Work

    You’ve got to feel bad for Microsoft. After years spent trying to find ways to expand its Xbox idea, it’s now having to revert some of them and go back to being a regular old games console. The company has run into a hard truth: In the minds of the market “console” means something specific, and the market is not inclined to expand its thinking. Read More

  • What Games Are: E3 Was Wild, But AAA Games Are Still A Mess

    What Games Are: E3 Was Wild, But AAA Games Are Still A Mess

    E3 was wild and loud, and Sony seemed to rise while Microsoft fell low. Yet it doesn’t really change anything as regards the long-term future of big budget consoe games. With costs continuing to escalate and the break-even point passing 5,6 or 10 million copies, the next generation will be the last for some. Read More

  • What Games Are: Have We Hit “Peak Mobile”?

    What Games Are: Have We Hit “Peak Mobile”?

    Mobile gaming may still be a very hot ticket, but with the recent news from companies like Zynga and Tapjoy of closures an difficulty, it does seem to have become a more difficult landscape. With the costs of user acquisition continuing and a sense that perhaps the customer is not as blind as before, the question of whether mobile gaming has peaked is important to consider. Are we at the top yet? Read More

  • What Games Are: Who Will Create The No-Bullshit Games Console?

    What Games Are: Who Will Create The No-Bullshit Games Console?

    For a device category whose core appeal is supposed to be making games simple, we get complex ambitions, the rush to features and a proposition that increasingly makes no sense. What is a game console supposed to be for? What is its core purpose? How do we deliver core purpose and connect with the root reason for buying into these platforms in the first place? Who will get past the bullshit? Read More

  • What Games Are: Xbox One Is Microsoft’s Spruce Goose

    What Games Are: Xbox One Is Microsoft’s Spruce Goose

    Microsoft’s Xbox One presents a big and complicated machine whose primary purpose is a menu layer for watching television. This in an age where living room television is irrelevant. Having bet the farm on this vision, the company looks so out of step as to almost be laughable and has built the digital equivalent of the Spruce Goose. Read More

  • What Games Are: Cometh The Hour, Cometh The Xbox?

    What Games Are: Cometh The Hour, Cometh The Xbox?

    With Xbox 360 having started well but ended in a very confused state, I worry that Microsoft is about to carry over much of its baggage to the new console. Will the company make the same mistake of not listening to the market that it has often made in recent years? Will it continue to believe that there is a burgeoning market for an everything box? Or will it refocus on what matters? Read More

  • What Games Are: There Is No Iron Throne Of Games Anymore

    What Games Are: There Is No Iron Throne Of Games Anymore

    We all know that big changes are happening in games, with the profusion of formats. What less of us realize is how much those changes have affected the underlying idea that one console or platform is the “gaming king”. Some of us even pine for a return to those days, but they are gone. Likely forever. Read More

  • What Games Are: Ok Glass, Let’s Talk Games

    What Games Are: Ok Glass, Let’s Talk Games

    It’s a little bit sexy and a little bit dorky, but Google Glass has finally arrived. Beyond the initial productivity uses of the device, how important are games going to be for driving its adoption, and what kind of games might work for it? Read More

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