Jon Evans

Jon Evans is a novelist, journalist, and software engineer. His novels have been published around the world, translated into several languages, and praised by The Times, The Economist, and the Washington Post. His journalism has appeared in Wired, Reader’s Digest, The Guardian, The Globe & Mail, and The Times of India, and he writes a weekly column for TechCrunch. Jon also has a degree in electrical engineering and a decade of experience as a software developer, building everything from smartphone apps to billion-dollar asset-allocation services.

CrunchBase profile →

Featured Picks from Jon Evans


Latest from Jon Evans

  • Samsung Quietly Continues To Conquer The World

    Samsung Quietly Continues To Conquer The World

    Is there anything Samsung doesn't do? The same week I bought myself a shiny new Galaxy S II, they launched a solar-powered netbook for use in the developing world. Unlike any American or European company, Samsung Electronics manufactures smartphones and their memory chips, TVs and their screens, computers and their hard drives. They're the only entity that's both arms dealer and aggressor in the… Read More

  • The Tragic Triumph Of The MBAs

    The Tragic Triumph Of The MBAs

    "We've seen Mubarak fall," said Salesforce's Marc Benioff of the corporate need to focus on social networks at the recent Dreamforce conference. "We've seen Khadafy fall. When will the first CEO fall for the same reason?" What a fantastic comparison! Because, as we all know, dictators who brutalize, torture, and murder thousands of their own people over a period of decades are just like CEOs who… Read More

  • The Long Hard Road To The Edge

    The Long Hard Road To The Edge

    A Year In The Life Of An Entrepeneur 1. July 2010: Ready: Set: Delaware, the state with the lowest highest point. David Argentar, a biochemist by training and bioinformaticist by trade, has launched a startup. Of sorts. Well - more of a hobby, he'd be the first to admit. He has no business plan, no investors, no employees. All he really has, in fact, is an idea and a pending patent. And as… Read More

  • Revenge Of The Killer Script Kiddies!

    Revenge Of The Killer Script Kiddies!

    They're out there. Be afraid. They could be anywhere, everywhere, anyone. They are shadowy, deadly, mysterious, guided by intellects vast and cool and unsympathetic. Security consultants and antivirus firms whisper legends of them to their clients to scare them straight. They're the Voldemort of online security, except that everyone is all too eager to say their name: the Advanced PersistentRead More

  • Americans Elect Shoots The Moon (And Misses)

    Americans Elect Shoots The Moon (And Misses)

    I want to talk about American politics. No, wait, don't go! Don't worry; it's OK; I'm Canadian. Your nation's psychotic death spiral of irrational blood vendettas, vampire-squid kleptocrats, and cargo-cult magical thinking means nothing to me. (Other than its undeniable entertainment value.) Yes, I mean both of your political parties. It's so bizarre that you only have two that matter. We have Read More

  • Welcome To The Panopticon

    Welcome To The Panopticon

    And so it begins. Carnegie Mellon researchers recently combined Facebook profile pictures and PittPatt's facial recognition software to identify supposedly-anonymous pictures from a dating site. Now they're planning to demo a smartphone app that identifies faces by tapping into cloud-based image databases and recognition software. What's next? That's a question I've been thinking about for a… Read More

  • Technology + Politics = Facepalm

    Technology + Politics = Facepalm

    Oh, how embarrassing. Earlier this week, Elizabeth May, the leader of Canada's Green Party, took to her Twitter account and declared war on wi-fi. To think I very nearly voted for these clowns in our recent election. Lesson for my American friends: just because you find all the major parties unpalatable doesn't mean that the fringe parties aren't even worse. Meanwhile, can someone please get an… Read More

  • Google Plus Has A Problem. Fear Not: I Have A Solution

    Google Plus Has A Problem. Fear Not: I Have A Solution

    Google Plus is terrific. I don't think it will ever be more than the Pepsi to Facebook's Coke, alas, but it's much slicker and better designed. It's too bad that the service has sacrificed a pile of goodwill over the last week by repeatedly publicly shooting themselves in the foot. First there was the brands mistake. Now it's gotten much worse: it seems they're deleting profiles wholesaleRead More

  • Intelligence Agencies Keep Getting Dumber

    Intelligence Agencies Keep Getting Dumber

    I'm in Mumbai. A few days ago, homemade bombs killed nineteen(1) people only blocks away from the Internet cafe in which I'm writing this, the latest in an eighteen-year string of terrorist attacks on India's busy commercial capital. And how have the authorities reacted? With sheer idiocy. Today, highway signs advised Mumbai's population: PLS. AVOID GOING TO CROWDED AREAS - which, in this densely… Read More

  • Power To The People

    Power To The People

    As I type this, a UPS beeps furiously behind me, and the growl of half-a-dozen diesel generators is audible down the street. I'm in Leh, a city nestled in a Himalayan valley surrounded by 6,000-metre / 20,000-foot peaks, the fast-growing capital of India's northernmost territory Ladakh. It's clearly outgrown its electrical capacity; power cuts hit several times a day. Power generation is a Read More

  • The Phoenix And The Dragon

    The Phoenix And The Dragon

    I'm in India. It's a glorious mess. The streets of Delhi remain a seething, endless vortex of chaos, as they were when I last visited eleven years ago, but nowadays, gleaming new highways, shopping malls, and five-star hotels rise above them. The sleek and efficient new metro system carries millions of people a day, but leaks in the monsoon rains. The suburb of Gurgaon looks completely First… Read More

  • Revolutions On The Road

    Revolutions On The Road

    I almost miss the bad old days. When I first started wandering around some of the more obscure nooks and crannies of this planet, lo these many years ago, Internet connections were rare and wonderful discoveries; now I just get annoyed when I can't get online. The last decade-and-a-half of innovation has completely transformed the experience of travel. Right now I'm in the middle of a… Read More

  • Is The World Crazy For Bitcoin, Or Has The Bitcoin World Gone Crazy?

    Is The World Crazy For Bitcoin, Or Has The Bitcoin World Gone Crazy?

    I last wrote about Bitcoin less than a month ago. (If you're one of the people who admitted in comments "I still don't get it," here's a terrific and detailed explainer from The Economist.) Since then the value of Bitcoins has quadrupled—and then halved. The founder of Sweden's Pirate Party moved all his savings into Bitcoin (which disappoints me; I had hoped they were buried on Oak Island) just… Read More

  • And Now For Some Unexpectedly Good News

    And Now For Some Unexpectedly Good News

    Don't look now, but sub-Saharan Africa is booming. Since 2003 its growth has been skyrocketing, and, to quote none other than McKinsey, "today the rate of return on foreign investment in Africa is higher than in any other developing region." There are several reasons: commodity prices, Chinese investment, diaspora remittances... and, I would argue, the GSM revolution that has swept the entire… Read More

  • This Is Where The Magic Happens

    This Is Where The Magic Happens

    Seventeen years ago Wired published Neal Stephenson's magisterial epic “Mother Earth Mother Board”, about the web of undersea fibre-optic cables being built to connect all of humanity. Well - almost all. Africa, again, was left behind. Until 2009, all of East Africa could only connect to the Internet over slow and hugely expensive satellite links. Finally, two years ago, SEACOM laid a cable… Read More

  • The Unconquered Nation, Crippled By Bureaucrats

    The Unconquered Nation, Crippled By Bureaucrats

    Seems like it's Sub-Saharan Month around here: first Sarah Lacy went to Nigeria, and now here I am in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia's capital and Africa's fourth-largest city. It feels like a boomtown. There are cranes and construction sites everywhere, throwing up gleaming new glass-and-steel buildings full of shops selling computers and mobile phones. The major thoroughfares throng with people making… Read More

  • Make.Money.Slow : The Bitcoin Experiment

    Make.Money.Slow : The Bitcoin Experiment

    Bitcoin. Oh, man, where to begin. Its Hype-O-Meter got cranked to 11 this week, and breathless histrionics are everywhere. Death and Taxes called this new currency "a seismic event"; Adam Cohen says it's nothing but a giant scam; Jason Calacanis calls it "the most dangerous project we've ever seen"; and they're all completely wrong. It's interesting, and innovative, and down the line it might even… Read More

  • When Dinosaurs Ruled The Books

    When Dinosaurs Ruled The Books

    This is a really weird time to be a writer. Agents are becoming publishers; publishers have moved to "the agency model"; and some self-published authors are making millions—all because e-books are now outselling all other segments. Magazines and newspapers are dying, blogs and aggregators are thriving, and the line between them all is blurring. Last year Apple was their savior; now it's damned… Read More

  • Why The New Guy Can’t Code

    Why The New Guy Can’t Code

    We've all lived the nightmare. A new developer shows up at work, and you try to be welcoming, but he1 can't seem to get up to speed; the questions he asks reveal basic ignorance; and his work, when it finally emerges, is so kludgey that it ultimately must be rewritten from scratch by more competent people. And yet his interviewers—and/or the HR department, if your company has been infested by… Read More

  • The Cloud Has Us All In A Fog

    The Cloud Has Us All In A Fog

    Ever heard of Dropship? It's an open-source project that "enables arbitrary, anonymous transfers of files between Dropbox accounts." Dropbox hopes you haven't; they tried to squelch it this week, and even accidentally reported that it was subject to a DMCA takedown notice, with predictably futile results. I'm mostly sympathetic: I'm a huge fan of their service, Dropship was a clear violation of… Read More