Danny Crichton

Danny Crichton
Danny Crichton is an award-winning researcher and writer on regional innovation hubs with an intense passion for building companies and building nations. He is currently a doctoral student at the Harvard Kennedy School, and a contributing writer for TechCrunch. Founding his first company in high school, Danny was formerly an investor at General Catalyst Partners, where he engaged companies in the mobile, labor, defense and security spaces. He led the technical infrastructure for SignalFire, a data-driven talent firm, and worked on several of the firm's investments. In 2011-2012, Danny was a Fulbright Scholar in South Korea, where he was a visiting researcher at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology in Daejeon. His research investigated the impact of Korean government policy on the engineering pipeline of new graduates between high school and the workforce, as well as the individuals and groups that have formed in the Seoul regional innovation hub. He presented his research at KAIST, the Korean-American Education Commission (KAEC), Samsung's Global Strategy Group, and on the Korean radio station Arirang. Before leaving the United States, he worked in product management at Google, where he conceived and launched Google+ Search. While at Stanford University in California, Danny wrote an award-winning thesis on the history of Silicon Valley and Stanford's Department of Computer Science, developing a novel ecosystem-based model to analyze the unique development of the world's most recognized regional innovation hub. He presented the paper at the Triple Helix Conference, one of the largest research organizations devoted to building regional innovation throughout the world. He has been quoted in The New York Times, Forbes, New York Magazine, Bloomberg BusinessWeek, BusinessInsider, as well as by the National Academies of Science. Danny graduated with honors and Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University with a B.S. in Mathematical and Computational Science. CrunchBase profile →

Featured Picks from Danny Crichton


Latest from Danny Crichton

  • Our Polyglot Nightmare

    Our Polyglot Nightmare

    The diversity of human languages has been on the decline for decades. With the rise of globalized communications and business, the world has accelerated its shedding of unpopular languages, as speakers increasingly focus their efforts on those that afford them the most economic and social opportunities. The loss of these languages has even spawned efforts like the Endangered Languages Project… Read More

  • With Political Failures Left And Right, Tech Needs To Rethink Its Strategy

    With Political Failures Left And Right, Tech Needs To Rethink Its Strategy

    Politics is the bête noire of hackers and entrepreneurs. It lacks the precision and logic of a function in a computer program while being incredibly inefficient to boot. Taxi services have been bad for decades in cities like San Francisco thanks to local politics, but a dedicated technology startup managed to ameliorate the situation in just a handful of years. Read More

  • With Software Eating Hardware, Silicon Valley Enters “Hard” Times

    With Software Eating Hardware, Silicon Valley Enters “Hard” Times

    Software’s inevitable dominance is something of an axiom in Silicon Valley, where Marc Andreessen once famously wrote that it was “eating the world.” Software companies like Microsoft, Google and Facebook are among the world’s most iconic and valuable, and new startups like Airbnb and Uber aim to transform traditional industries like hotels and taxis. Read More

  • Going Native

    Going Native

    One of the most important debates in mobile app development has been the trajectory of the mobile web compared to native apps. The question has been whether mobile web apps can gain enough support on iOS, Android and other mobile operating systems to provide a good user experience and ultimately compete with proprietary apps. Read More

  • With Google Domains, Let’s Raise Prices And Make SSL Certificates Free

    With Google Domains, Let’s Raise Prices And Make SSL Certificates Free

    Domain registration is a bit like renewing license plates at the Department of Motor Vehicles. It’s the annual tradition for web developers to secure their address on our public Internet by filling out a bunch of paperwork, such as giving contact information for the registrant, administrator, technical contact, and billing contact (even the DMV doesn’t require four copies of… Read More

  • Three Realities About Venture Capital

    Three Realities About Venture Capital

    This week’s kerfuffle over Yo centered on many facets, but none got more attention than the nascent startup’s $1.2 million in venture capital funding. The reaction to this investment across the web came in several flavors. Founders complained that their own startups created far more value for society than an app that essentially acts as a doorbell, and yet, they had not received… Read More

  • Yo, Virginia, There Is A Cult Of Disruption

    Yo, Virginia, There Is A Cult Of Disruption

    Disruption. From frenzied investment pitches on Sand Hill Road to the name of the top conference for startups in Silicon Valley (i.e. the people who pay my bills), that word has become synonymous with everything and everyone creating innovation today. Read More

  • As Teacher Tenure Degrades, New Opportunities Emerge For Startups To Remake Education

    As Teacher Tenure Degrades, New Opportunities Emerge For Startups To Remake Education

    One of the most notable court cases of the year for startups was officially revealed last week, and there was nary a peep from much of the tech press. Last week, a California judge struck down the state’s teacher tenure laws, arguing that tenure disproportionately harms the education of students from poor and minority school districts, and is thus unconstitutional. The case was brought… Read More

  • Productivity And The Education Delusion

    Productivity And The Education Delusion

    There is a constant tension about education in labor economics these days. On one hand, education is strongly correlated with income as well as employability. Workers with college degrees, or even just some university-level courses, are significantly more likely to have a job and to be paid better, as well. This is borne out by today’s U.S. jobs report, which showed a decrease of… Read More

  • It’s The Security, Stupid!

    It’s The Security, Stupid!

    It’s 2014. Do you know where your security is? On Tuesday, Google published a full account of the current state of encryption in email, revealing that some leading providers like Comcast and France’s Orange encrypted nearly none of the email that approached its servers. The news this week seemed to confirm many of our worst fears about the state of security on the Internet (as it… Read More

  • As Software Eats Up Jobs, Startups Need To Consider Ethics Of Marketplaces

    As Software Eats Up Jobs, Startups Need To Consider Ethics Of Marketplaces

    Anger can be a deeply chilling emotion when coursing through politics, and we have witnessed our fair share of it over the past few years. In San Francisco, we watched as protesters blocked buses, broke Google Glasses and demanded billions in compensation in front of tech executives homes. Nationally, we have seen the frustration of millions across the country through the Tea Party and Occupy… Read More

  • Messaging 2.0 Is Now Over

    Messaging 2.0 Is Now Over

    The second messaging revolution is now quickly coming to a close. With the news today that Korea’s leading messenger KakaoTalk is merging with one of that country’s largest internet portals, Daum Communications, we are witnessing the end of the rise of mobile-focused independent messaging startups that started just five years ago. Only Kik Messenger remains standing… Read More

  • The Era Of Good-Enough Smartphones

    The Era Of Good-Enough Smartphones

    The U.S. smartphone market remains quite peculiar. Despite a plethora of inexpensive models from other companies, Apple and Samsung remain the dominant manufacturers that collectively take about 68 percent of the market and whose iPhones and Galaxies are among the most expensive options available. Read More

  • As Samsung’s Chairman Remains Hospitalized, South Korea Prepares For Its Next Act

    As Samsung’s Chairman Remains Hospitalized, South Korea Prepares For Its Next Act

    There is a tension at the core of all great startup stories between the cold technology that powers these businesses and the raw, emotional hearts of founders discovering their humanity under some of the most searing conditions imaginable. Too often in the tech press, we glide over the human soul of our stories in the pursuit of the next feature, the next funding round, the next acquisition. It… Read More

  • The New Dynamics Of Unicorn Startup Acquisitions

    The New Dynamics Of Unicorn Startup Acquisitions

    The rumors of a possible $3.2 billion acquisition of Beats Electronics by Apple spread far and wide last week, and rightfully so. It wouldn’t just be the largest acquisition of all time for the 38-year old computer company — dwarfing the $429 million received by Steve Jobs’ NeXT in 1996 — but also the seventh billion- or near-billion-dollar “unicorn”… Read More

  • As Mobile Roars Ahead, It’s Time To Finally Admit The Web Is Dying

    As Mobile Roars Ahead, It’s Time To Finally Admit The Web Is Dying

    While discussions about tech bubbles have been heated, few commentators seem to be targeting their invective at the real underlying bubble: the World Wide Web itself is crumbling. Like any outmoded technology, the Web is rapidly losing users as it fails to adapt to disruption from mobile apps and continues to perform poorly – despite incredible optimization efforts – due to a… Read More

  • Alibaba Is Not A Threat To US Internet Companies

    Alibaba Is Not A Threat To US Internet Companies

    Everybody loves superlatives, and it is definitely Superlatives Week for the tech press. Alibaba’s IPO will represent “surely one of tech’s largest ever” Kara Swisher of Re/code intoned. Heather Somerville and Brandon Bailey of the San Jose Mercury News said that the company would have “an immediate market value greater than Facebook and Amazon” when it debuts. Read More

  • With IPO Hopes Fading, Square And Box Face Reality Of Commodity Products

    With IPO Hopes Fading, Square And Box Face Reality Of Commodity Products

    Square and Box would seem to be the very epitome of every startup founder’s dream of reaching the pinnacle of entrepreneurial success. Take a kernel of an idea and turn it into a massive, multi-billion-dollar company that publicly debuts in an IPO. For the founders involved, the exhilaration and elation of that drive to the top must be deeply palpable, and at times it probably seems… Read More

  • Finishing Its Third Batch, Korea’s KStartup Accelerator Sees Great Hope For Seoul’s Tech Ecosystem

    Finishing Its Third Batch, Korea’s KStartup Accelerator Sees Great Hope For Seoul’s Tech Ecosystem

    KStartup, a Seoul-based non-profit accelerator started by David Lee and KJ Byeon, is designed to not just assist startups, but to build a wider ecosystem. “It’s a harder job here versus a lot of the Valley accelerators,” says Lee, who currently serves as partner on the team. “There is a lot that is taken for granted in the Valley, because everyone there is in the… Read More

  • Microsoft Is Technology’s Comeback Kid

    Microsoft Is Technology’s Comeback Kid

    Microsoft. For a generation of technology executives, the name strikes fear into even the most iron-willed business leaders. A lion among gazelles, its very gaze into a market could cause investors and analysts to flee in terror. Yet, its name has become a punchline among today’s technorati, a joke about formerly dominant companies evolving into large, plodding kludges. Missed… Read More