Alex Wilhelm

Alex Wilhelm

Alex Wilhelm is a writer for TechCrunch. He lives in San Francisco.

Disclosure: I own a minor quantity of shares in AOL, the parent company of TechCrunch, that were purchased through the firm's employee share purchase program. My 401k and other accounts are invested into diversified global funds that include both equities and bonds. I own no other individual shares in companies, either private or public. I'm currently dating someone who works for a Google subsidiary.

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  • Box Said To Move Forward With Its Debut As The Tech IPO Market Perks Up

    Box Said To Move Forward With Its Debut As The Tech IPO Market Perks Up

    Box, a cloud storage and file management company, could be moving its IPO forward once again. Box famously filed, and then didn’t hit go on, its offering in the time frame that the market initially expected. A deterioration in market sentiment and the share price decline of a number of growth technology stocks led to a general slowdown in the IPO pipeline. Read More

  • Microsoft Promises To Render Your Smartphone Useless If It’s Stolen

    Microsoft Promises To Render Your Smartphone Useless If It’s Stolen

    This morning, Microsoft promised to meet the stipulations of the CTIA’s Smartphone Anti-Theft Voluntary Commitment before the goal-date of July 2015. Specifically, Microsoft will bring remote-wipe; bricking of lost handsets; reactivation protection for stolen handsets; and the ability to undo phone “inoperability” if the handset in question is recovered. Read More

  • Court Rules That Non-Relevant Files Seized Under A Warrant Cannot Be Held Indefinitely

    Court Rules That Non-Relevant Files Seized Under A Warrant Cannot Be Held Indefinitely

    Say the government gets a warrant for some of your data. They come to your house, image your computers, and then hold that data — even the data that isn’t pertinent to their warrant — for several years. That’s not okay, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently ruled. This is a good ruling, as it limits the ability of the government to hold files that are not party… Read More

  • Funding Amendment To Curtail Warrantless Surveillance Proposed In House

    Funding Amendment To Curtail Warrantless Surveillance Proposed In House

    A bipartisan group of Congress members have proposed two amendments to the Fiscal Year 2015 Department of Defense Appropriations Act aimed at reining in government surveillance. The first amendment would ban the funding of government to either demand or request a “backdoor” into products built by technology companies. The second would ban the funding of searches of the data of… Read More

  • US Marshals Accidentally Replies All To Anonymous Bitcoin Auction Bidders In Email Fiasco

    US Marshals Accidentally Replies All To Anonymous Bitcoin Auction Bidders In Email Fiasco

    In a magnificent show of technical ineptitude, today the U.S. Marshals revealed the identities of many anonymous bidders in its $18 million seized Silk Road Bitcoin auction by CC’ing them on an email thread. When one asked a question, the response was sent to 40 of the bidders, many whose names were attached or easily identifiable from their addresses, negating the whole point of the… Read More

  • Microsoft Kills Vendor Program That Offered To Pay People To Write About IE

    Microsoft Kills Vendor Program That Offered To Pay People To Write About IE

    Repeat after me: Don’t pay people to write about your thing. Repeat after me: Don’t offer to pay people to write about your thing. Repeat after me: People will write about your thing if they think that your thing is cool, or newsworthy, so build things that are cool, or newsworthy. Microsoft was called out last night for a program, executed through a third party, offering… Read More

  • Exercise Competition App Fitt Leaves Beta, Wants You To Get Off Your Lazy Backside

    Exercise Competition App Fitt Leaves Beta, Wants You To Get Off Your Lazy Backside

    Fitt took the beta wrapper off its fitness competition service today and launched to the general public. The service previously spun an early beta group of 120 users into more than 10,000, depending on those first users to invite others onto its platform. Another fitness app? Yes, but of a slightly different varietal: Fitt is built around the idea of challenges and wants you to keep moving. Read More

  • Microsoft Cuts The Price Of Its Now-Dated Surface Pro 2 Tablet Hybrid

    Microsoft Cuts The Price Of Its Now-Dated Surface Pro 2 Tablet Hybrid

    Here’s a non-surprise: Microsoft is discounting its line of Surface Pro 2 tablets by $100 to $200, configuration depending. When Microsoft announced the Surface Pro 3, a device that has received stronger reviews by the media than its predecessors, we asked if it would continue to sell the Surface Pro 2. The company replied with the following comment: “Surface 2 and Surface Pro 2… Read More

  • Adobe Picks Up 464K Creative Cloud Subscribers In Q2, Ends With 2.3M

    Adobe Picks Up 464K Creative Cloud Subscribers In Q2, Ends With 2.3M

    After the bell today, Adobe announced its fiscal second-quarter financial performance, including $1.07 billion in revenue, $0.17 per share in earnings using GAAP metrics, and $0.37 per share without. The company’s shares are up sharply in after-hours trading, spiking more than 9 percent. Critical to the company’s quarter are the 464,000 new Creative Cloud subscriptions it picked… Read More

  • SolarCity Ends The Day Up 17.58% After It Purchases Silevo, Announces Manufacturing Plans

    SolarCity Ends The Day Up 17.58% After It Purchases Silevo, Announces Manufacturing Plans

    Shares of SolarCity jumped 17.58 percent in regular trading today, as investors applauded its decision to purchase solar-panel manufacturer Silevo, which had plans to build a factory in New York. SolarCity intends to build the plant and scale it to “capacity greater than 1 GW within the next two years.” Read More

  • Three Senators Decry The House’s NSA Bill, Citing “Watered Down” Reform

    Three Senators Decry The House’s NSA Bill, Citing “Watered Down” Reform

    A trio of Senators wrote an op-ed for the LA Times calling for NSA reform and decrying the bill that passed the House recently as insufficient for the protection of the privacy of U.S. citizens. The Senators, Rand Paul, Mark Udall and Ron Wyden, come from both parties. Senator Wyden is known as the senator that Director of National Intelligence James Clapper lied to, regarding government… Read More

  • Bill To Ban Internet Fast Lanes Proposed In Congress

    Bill To Ban Internet Fast Lanes Proposed In Congress

    Democrats in the House and Senate introduced legislation today regarding so-called Internet fast lanes, which are currently under debate at the FCC. The FCC is reviewing and accepting comment on a set of recently proposed net neutrality rules aimed at formally codifying open Internet principles. Read More

  • Congress Set To Permanently Ban Taxation Of Internet Access

    Congress Set To Permanently Ban Taxation Of Internet Access

    What has 214 co-sponsors in the House and is probably going to become law? More popular than ice cream, the Permanent Internet Tax Freedom Act would forever ban taxation of Internet access and “discriminatory” taxes on “electronic commerce.” You’ll note that the bill is called the Permanent Internet Tax Freedom Act, and not the Internet Tax Freedom Act. Read More

  • Yahoo Drops 5% After Alibaba’s Updated F-1 Filing Indicates Slipping Margins

    Yahoo Drops 5% After Alibaba’s Updated F-1 Filing Indicates Slipping Margins

    Yahoo’s stock, behaving as a proxy to Alibaba’s valuation, is down 5 percent today in midday regular trading, after the Alibaba’s updated F-1 filing indicated that its operating margins are declining. According to the company, for its most recently ended fiscal quarter, its operating margin “declined from 51.3% to 45.3%,” when compared to the comparable… Read More

  • GHash Looks To Quell Bitcoin Market Worries In Wake Of “51%” Scare

    GHash Looks To Quell Bitcoin Market Worries In Wake Of “51%” Scare

    The bitcoin community was rattled recently when it became known that GHash, a mining pool, had crossed the 51 percent mark, indicating that it was powering more than half of the computing heft that undergirds the cryptocurrency’s foundation. At issue is the general consensus that any party that controls 51 percent or more of that computational power can do unkind things with bitcoin at… Read More

  • Box Acquires YC-Backed Streem

    Box Acquires YC-Backed Streem

    This morning Box, a cloud-based file-management service, announced that it has acquired Streem, a Y Combinator-backed company that allows customers to “stream” files to their desktop environments. Box declined to share terms of the agreement, but did note in an email that it bought the company using a blend of cash and stock. The four members of Streem will join Box. Read More

  • ‘51%’ Fears Rattle The Bitcoin Community

    ‘51%’ Fears Rattle The Bitcoin Community

    In January, there was worry in the bitcoin community regarding GHash, a mining pool. It controlled a rising share of the total bitcoin computational power used to mine the cryptocurrency — it’s share was creeping towards the 50% mark. Here’s a sample of what was written in January, when GHash was at a still-distant 42%: “[That percentage puts] uncomfortably close to… Read More

  • Tech Giants Join Microsoft In Calling For US Gov To End Use Of Warrants To Demand Overseas Data

    Tech Giants Join Microsoft In Calling For US Gov To End Use Of Warrants To Demand Overseas Data

    Microsoft’s case to prevent the United States government from using search warrants to demand data that is not stored in the United States has picked up a number of high-profile backers, including the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Verizon, AT&T, and, recently, Apple and Cisco. The final two filed a joint amicus brief, which details their protest of the practice. Microsoft lost… Read More

  • Court Orders Department Of Justice To Privately Produce Secret Surveillance Court Documents

    Court Orders Department Of Justice To Privately Produce Secret Surveillance Court Documents

    Today, Judge Yvonne Rogers of the District Court, Northern California District ordered that the Department of Justice produce documents relating to five Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA court) decisions. The documents won’t be released to the public, but the decision grants the Judge the ability to review in private the material that the government doesn’t want released. Read More

  • Bitcoin’s Price And The Public Interest

    Bitcoin’s Price And The Public Interest

    When bitcoin’s price skyrockets, the printing presses kick into high gear. And when Bitcoin collapses, a new crop of stories go out. Something interesting is happening at the moment, however, as we have recently seen a decoupling of bitcoin’s price and the public interest. In short, bitcoin’s recent rally hasn’t been matched with rising consumer interest in the currency. Read More