Readyforce Gives Students A Chance To Explore Options Before Picking Their First Jobs

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Readyforce, a professional network for college students, is launching a new tool aimed at students who have already received job offers but would like to see what else might be out there for them.

Called “Explore Your Options,” the tool lets students submit offers of recommendation and their resume separately from their regular profiles on the site. Companies interested in recruiting students who have gotten offers from top companies like Apple and Google can look through those submissions (except for students who they gave offers to) and try to make a connection before the student’s window closes on the original offer.

In a phone call with Readyforce CEO Alex Mooradian, he explained that the idea for the tool came from his discussions with students using the site. Readyforce primarily focuses on computer science and engineering students, many of whom would take one internship at a major company, get a job offer, and take it out of fear that other great opportunities might not be waiting for them if they decline. Mooradian thought that by giving students a last chance to see what’s out there, small companies could get a crack at top talent and young engineers can feel more secure about the job they do end up choosing. “We’re not trying to start a bidding war,” Mooradian says. “We’re trying to help make better outcomes for everybody.”

As of today’s launch, 200 students and 25 companies have signed up for the new program, though not all of the students will get to participate, as Mooradian points out that the windows provided in some job offers can last as little as a single day while others receive only verbal offers until a student confirms that they will take the job if they receive a formal offer. What’s more, some companies (both small and large) have pushed back at Readyforce’s idea, worried that it will push wages for entry-level engineers up further.

Since no one is obligated to hire anybody — it’s only making connections — Mooradian isn’t particularly worried about causing wage inflation. For now, Readyforce is going to offer the program as a free service to both students and their potential employers so that they can see how it works in practice. As more sign up, the company is considering charging companies for the privilege of getting a crack at top candidates, though they’re still working out the details on pricing.

Featured Image: Texas A&M University-Commerce Marketing Communications Photography UNDER A Creative Commons LICENSE