Bottlenose

Bottlenose Adds Real-Time TV And Radio Data To Its Social Trend Monitoring

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Bottlenose, a startup that helps large brands find emerging trends, is expanding beyond social media today with the addition of Broadcast Analytics, which allows customers to see TV and radio data.

In order to accomplish this, Bottlenose has partnered with media monitoring company Critical Mention. According to Bottlenose co-founder and CEO Nova Spivack, Critical Mention is ingesting and transcribing 40 hours of video and audio programming every minute, then Bottlenose can treat Critical Mention’s data as another firehose of text to analyze.

For example, the company says customers could use this data to track mentions of a company as they spread across live broadcasts, see how different topics relate to one another, track the sentiment around companies or people, and correlate TV conversations with those on the web. That analysis, in turn, can be used for activities like ad buying.

One of the things that sets Bottlenose apart, Spivack said, is the ability to look at social media and broadcast data in one product (hence the ability to connect TV and web conversations that I mentioned above). Another is the fact that it’s real time — Spivack said that most competitors who describe themselves with the same buzzword really mean that they ingest the data in real-time, and then analyze it, whereas Bottlenose’s analysis happens at the time of ingestion.

More broadly, he suggested that Bottlenose is doing something “very different” from social listening services, which focus on helping companies see where they’re mentioned on social media and then respond to complaints, questions, and so on.

“What we do is we find trends in massive amounts of data,” Spivack said. “We figure out what’s important in real time.”

Lastly, he disclosed that since we covered Bottlenose’s $3.6 million fundraise last summer, the company has raised more money, bringing its total funding to around $6 million.