Revenue-Sharing “Knowledge Community” Teckler Launches Its First Mobile App

Next Story

Microsoft Was Right To Worry That Government Snooping Constituted An ‘Advanced Persistent Threat’

Teckler is a site where users get a share of the revenue for the articles, photos, and other media that they post. And with the recent launch of the Teckler iPhone app, users will be able to post from their phone too.

When I discussed the platform with founder and CEO Claudio Gandelman (previously the Latin American president for Match.com), he pitched it as a way for people who don’t have a website or blog of their own to share interesting content, particularly in areas where they have expertise. The site (and the quality of the content) seems pretty broad, covering topics like medicine, love/romance, and technology.

Probably the most attention-grabbing thing about Teckler, however, is the fact that anyone can post and start getting a share of ad revenue —¬†users are supposed to get 70 percent of the money from the ads that running alongside their content (they can cash out after an audit period and once there’s more than 50 cents in their account).

How much money can they make? Well, this is actually popular discussion topic on Teckler itself. The company says that since its launch in June, it has paid out $20,000 total — so, not a tiny amount of money, but it probably hasn’t changed anyone’s life either … The company also says that contributors aren’t the only ones reading the site — they only account for 2 percent of Teckler’s 9 million monthly uniques.

Gandelman also told me that even though the company itself is based in Brazil, its biggest audience is in the United States.

As for the new iOS app, he said it’s really optimized around two of the big things people like to do on their phones — browsing content and taking photos. So naturally, the app allows you to read Teckler content and post photos. The company plans to add the ability to write posts from your phone as well.

“I believe that in six months mobile will be bigger than the web for us,” Gandelman added.