TestFlight Celebrates 400K Apps Beta-Tested With Rewritten iOS SDK, Android SDK’s Wide Release

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Mobile app beta testing service TestFlight is seeing steady growth, with considerable progress being made during the last 90 days in terms of new apps uploaded to its platform. TestFlight, which is now owned by Burstly, has now seen 400,000 apps in total added to its service, which represents nearly half of the active apps on the iTunes Store, for a sense of perspective. Over 150,000 of those came in the last three months.

TestFlight’s previous 90 day best was 100,000, reported back in March, and so far the company has seen 15,000 Android apps uploaded since the beta launch of that SDK back in May. The Android SDK should start ramping up usage, however, as it’s now out of beta and available widely to the entire Android developer community.

The iOS version has also been completely rewritten, and is now more efficient and more stable, with improvements designed to help improve game performance while also gathering all the necessary crash reporting data and more. The new crash report features also include an ability to mark crash issues as resolved, and they feed more info around the context surrounding crashes to help developers fix them easier. Plus it’s now integrated into FlightPath’s analytics data around app performance, so you can see how crashes are affecting user retention rates and user flow.

Since its acquisition by Burstly in March of last year, TestFlight has been hard at work building out new products like FlightPath, boosting existing features with its Android expansion, and creating new monetization options for mobile developers via SkyRocket. The Burstly acquisition really lit a fire under the team and gave TestFlight legs to pursue its vision, something which co-founder Ben Satterfield explained as helping motivate the decision to sell the company to begin with.

“This is us believing in the bigger vision,” he told Josh Constine when the company was originally acquired. “[The original TestFlight] is a great product on its own, and we could have charged and gone scrappy with it month to month, but we want to wake up every day and go after something big.”

Traction to date seems to indicate they’re accomplishing that mission well, a little over a year later.