New Voxeet Mobile Apps Offer Stereo HD Sound For Conference Calls With No Audio Bridge

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Voxeet has new apps for the iPhone and the Android that provide stereo HD sound for conference calls without any audio bridge.

I had a demo last week and I was definitely impressed. My Android HTC Sensation has awful sound quality. My wife can never hear what I say. “Please speak clearly, Alex, I can’t hear you.” On conference calls, I will often TALK VERY LOUDLY so the people I interview can hear me. Not good. I like to use Skype, but forget about any kind of video connection. It’s a bandwidth hog, killing the audio link.

The Voxeet app is easy to use. Invite your contacts and call them. That’s pretty much it. Once in the call, you can tell who is talking by the stereo sound and the visual cues in the user interface.

VoxeetUI_hi-res_contacts

Voxeet has three main attributes:

  1. High-definition sound provides an experience you just can’t get from an audio bridge.
  2. Stereo sound so you know who the people are in the call.
  3. Mobile syncing to easily move between the desktop and the mobile.

Voxeet is self-funded. Founded in 2008, the company hails from Bordeaux, France, and Silicon Valley. Earlier this fall it won the Demo God award at the bi-annual startup conference. The company has a desktop version that is available in Windows. Why only Windows? Company execs say it is because they are addressing the enterprise market where Windows dominates. But for me it is of no matter. The app is available on the iPhone and the Android. And that pretty much covers it for most of us, though I do look forward to the Mac version, which they have planned for next year.

Voxeet will also add collaborative features next year, including recording and screen sharing.

Voxeet is one of a number of next-generation conference call services to enter the market with the hopes of disrupting the likes of WebEx  and GoToMeeting. Earlier this week I profiled Speek.com, which hopes to disrupt the market with a service that gives each customer a unique web address of their choosing.