Asana Competitor Wrike Launches Its New Mobile Apps, Wants To Make Social Project Management Quick And Easy

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Wrike, the increasingly popular social project management and collaboration platform, just announced the re-launch of its mobile apps for iPhone and Android. In addition, Wrike also launched a new mobile web app for all other platforms.

It’s worth noting that this isn’t Wrike’s first foray into mobile apps. The company released a set of iPhone, iPad and BlackBerry apps early last year, but as Wrike founder and CEO Andrew Filev told me last week, those apps were due for a complete overhaul. The new apps, Filev stressed, are ahead of most of the personal to-do apps that are on the market today. Unlike most of its competitors, including the well-funded Asana, Wrike puts a stronger emphasis on collaboration and providing a full project management solution.

Given the limitations of mobile design, the new apps won’t feature the complex timeline view of the web app or the spreadsheet view, but everything else is pretty much there. The new apps, for example, allow users to add and edit their tasks and projects, and to discuss issues in real-time. Filev was especially proud of the real-time aspect of the whole platform (which also includes push notifications on the mobile side).

The new mobile apps, he said, have been in the making for almost a year. The goal of the re-design was to make complex processes as simple as possible, while also giving users a beautiful and fully featured app. ” We’re enhancing our users’ mobile experience so that they take advantage of Wrike’s power no matter what device they’re using it on – be it their PC or smartphone. Sometimes it might require a single click or tap to make a mission-critical update to your project. With Wrike’s new mobile apps, we want to make sure you can always make that action on time!” Filev said in a canned statement today.

Wrike, which was founded in 2006, did not take any outside funding until earlier this year, when it raised a comparatively small $1 million round led by TMT Investments. Earlier this year, Wrike also released a free version of its service for teams with up to five users. The service currently has about 2,500 paying customers, including a number of major Fortune 500 enterprise companies.