Rupert Murdoch Offers Twitter Support To WSJ Customer Who Didn’t Get Paper Delivered

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Taylor Swift Doesn’t Want Me To Listen To Her New Album On Spotify. Not So Swift.

It’s a cliche to say that Twitter allows the everyman to connect with the movers and shakers of the media and entertainment industries. But it’s so true! Today’s case in point: the humble Edward Barr, investor and WSJ reader from Lexington, Kentucky, uses the communication tool to put in a complaint about the poor WSJ paper delivery service in his neighborhood. And he takes it right to the top, on Twitter.

“second time in one month no WSJ at my door,” Barr tweets at @rupertmurdoch, “In today’s world that is beyond inexcusable#especially@$438peryear. a great product that I miss when not there on timely basis#thanksforthepromptreply.”

Other than having a pretty wacky understanding of how to use hashtags, this print WSJ customer is 100% right on the money about how to get the mogul’s attention, “Yes. Where are you?” Ol’ Rupey replies, to which Barr gives his location and zip code.

It’s been about 45 minutes since this exchange, and I am left wondering whether Rupert has abandoned his computer to get down to Kentucky and personally deliver the paper or is sending people to hack into this dude’s mailbox or mailing him a free subscription or what. It would be hilarious if he tweeted back that Barr could also read the paper online (for free if you Google specific article URLs), but that’s not going to happen.

This exchange is also pretty amazing because you’d think the 106th-richest person in the world would have more pressing tasks to attend to, but I guess good customer service really does begin with the CEO. The WSJ’s holding company NewsCorp is set to fork into two different companies by next June, splitting into a more profitable, less tainted entertainment division and a media company slated to be run by Dow Jones EIC Robert Thomson.

We can only hope Thomson’s social media habits are just as enthralling as Murdoch’s.

Update: Barr confirms that he actually did read the WSJ online, “but [it was] not the same experience.” Betcha Rupe’s happy to hear that one.