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PornFeud: Sex.com Claims Pinterest Is Banning Racy Pins

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There’s trouble brewing in Pinterest land. Sex.com [SFW] (a site that can be arguably described as a Pinterest with yoo yoos and ha has) has been banned as a source for user pins, thereby reducing the freedoms of every man and woman who feels it is their god-given right to create a Pinterest collection called “More Yam Yams Than You Can Shake A Stick At.”

Wrote Sex.com [NSFW] media department head Iain MacNeil:

Without contacting us, Pinterest banned all activity from Sex.com. Pinterest users can no longer pin any content from Sex.com nor can they view the site from older pins. We’ve unjustly been marked as spam. Our attempts to contact Pinterest have been fruitless. We want to know why they banned their adult community from seeing an alternative. Is it as simple as Pinterest is afraid of losing the adult content community despite the fact they do not respect users who use their site for adult content? Or is it that Pinterest does not believe a female audience for Sex.com is inappropriate?

To be clear, Pinterest contains porn [NSFW]. Maybe it’s not full-bore wingwom on dingslap action, but it’s there. Think of it as the 50 Shades Of Grey kind of stuff rather than the two-girls-one-bazinga-style porn you’re thinking of. You know, classy stuff.

Now, however, photos sourced from Sex.com will be marked as spam. “The most exciting prospect of Sex.com being linked through Pinterest was not just the potential growth for our site but also appealing to a female audience,” said MacNeil. That’s all over now.

“In all official Pinterest Terms of Service they claim that pins are the responsibility of the user. So on what grounds do they have the right to supersede the user’s ability to pin from Sex.com?”

While this sounds a lot like an aggrieved pornographer fighting back against a frigid corporation, Pinterest makes its money (or is trying to make its money) by banking on content that other people have created. If they don’t want some of the most popular content in the world on their site, fine. But they have to either say no wee woos and ping baps at all or let the hoo hoo floodgates open.

 

Editor’s Note: An earlier version of this story referred to Iain MacNeil as the founder of sex.com. He is in fact the head of the media department.