HTC Confirms Jelly Bean Updates For Most One Series Smartphones

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No one really expected HTC to let their newest smartphones languish without Android 4.1 Jelly Bean, but it’s always nice to hear that sentiment confirmed straight from the source. Representatives from the Taiwanese company noted earlier this morning that the company’s flagship One X, One XL, and One S handsets would indeed get a taste of Jelly Bean at some point down the line.

Engadget was also able to confirm that some of the North American carrier variants of those devices would also get the update, so owners of the the AT&T or Rogers One X and the T-Mobile One S will eventually get the chance to join in the fun. Sadly, there’s no word yet if modified models like Sprint’s EVO 4G LTE will get the delicious little update, but it’s almost certainly just a matter of time.

Interestingly, one member of the One family is conspicuously absent from the list: the relatively-tiny One V. It launched both internationally and on Sprint’s Virgin Mobile subsidiary with the usual Sense-ified version of Ice Cream Sandwich, but there are rumblings that the under-the-hood improvements found in Jelly Bean may be too much for the device’s older Snapdragon S2 chipset. I wouldn’t worry too much if I were a One V owner though — someone is bound to cook up a Jelly Bean ROM for the little guy before long.

As usual though, there was no mention of when the company would officially push out the update, though I suspect it won’t be making the rounds for some time. HTC has to ensure that their Sense 4.0 modifications jibe with Jelly Bean, and what’s more, the carriers have to put the builds through extensive testing. That part of the process already seems to have tripped up one Jelly Bean update push — Nexus S owners on Vodafone Australia were promised that the update would come this week, but The Next Web reports the rollout is being held up because Jelly Bean’s emergency call functionality isn’t up to regulatory standards.